Lorenzo's Oil


2h 20m 1992

Brief Synopsis

Story about a couple who defy the medical professionals and try to save the life of their son who's suffering from an "incurable" disease.

Film Details

Also Known As
aceite de la vida, El
MPAA Rating
Release Date
1992
Distribution Company
Universal Pictures
Location
Washington, DC, USA; Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 20m

Synopsis

Story about a couple who defy the medical professionals and try to save the life of their son who's suffering from an "incurable" disease.

Cast

Luis Ruiz

Leontyne Price

Performer

Mack Hegyes

David Shiner

Nora Dunfee

Ann Hearn

Nicholas Wiese

Maduka Steady

Eliot Brinton

Joan Carden

Performer

Peter Ustinov

Cristin Woodworth

Gerry Bamman

Laura Linney

Sandy Gore

Raina Clifford

Anthony Dileo

Paul Lazar

Kathleen Wilhoite

Eric Kunkle

Susan Chapek

Richard Greager

Performer

Barbara Poitier

Rocco Sisto

James Merrill

Lianne Kressin

Nancy Chesney

Mary Schmidt Campbell

Don Suddaby

Margo Martindale

Helena Ruoti

Mary Wakio

Vienna Boys Choir

Performer

Tia Delaney

Shirley Tannenbaum

Vladimir Padunov

Ann Dowd

James Rebhorn

Keiko Mcdonald

Richard Cordery

William Cameon

Lamont Arnold

Billy Amman

Charles R Altman

Kathryn Aronson

Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra

Performer

Zack O'malley Greenburg

Becky Ann Baker

Zahra Ilkanipour

Malcolm Messiter

Performer

Michael Haider

E. G. Daily

Ryan Thomas

Nick Nolte

C Alex Roberts

John Mowod

Maria Callas

Performer

Jennifer Dundas

Nicolas Petrov

Peter Mackenzie

Marie Nugent-head

Noah Banks

Lisa Montgomery

David Mcfadden

Aaron Jackson

Tito Schipa

Performer

Julie Marie Remele

Ann Mcdonough

Lamar Olivis

Joyce Reehling

David Doepken

Amelia Campbell

Daniel W D'arcy

Keith Reddin

Neri Kyle Tannenbaum

Carmen Piccini

Connie Cranden

Justin Isfeld

Nona Gerard

Ryonosuke Shiono

William Thunhurst

Jeremy Beyer

Matthew Pyeritz

Susan Sarandon

Rachel Jones

Latanya Richardson

Annie Loeffler

Todd Bella

Michael O'neill

Christine Merriman

Brad Einhorn

Angus Barnett

Berta Van Zuiden

Mary Pat Gleason

Colin Ward

April Merscher

Michaela Fukacova

Performer

Ayub Ommaya

Crew

Jessica Abrams

Assistant Production Coordinator

Ronald Alston

Production

Steve Andrews

Assistant Director

Mikki Ansin

Photography

Annelise Archer

On-Set Dresser

Brian W Armstrong

Camera Operator

Colleen Atwood

Costume Designer

Rick Baker

Prosthetics

Catherine Barber

Other

Samuel Barber

Music

Alan Barry

Gaffer

Shirley Bates

Special Thanks To

Peter Bennett Beal

Electrician

Suzy Belcher

Makeup

Vincenzo Bellini

Music

Andrew Bernstein

Production Assistant

Leonard Bernstein

Music Conductor

Matthew Best

Music Conductor

Leah Blackwood

Scenic Artist

Mia Boccella

On-Set Dresser

George Bolton

Other

Kathryn Borland

Scenic Artist

Vincent Borrelli

Scenic Artist

Dennis Bradford

Art Director

Chris Brigham

Unit Production Manager

Chuck Brown

Dolly Grip

Kevin Brubaker

Location Scout

Cathy Bruce

Scenic Artist

Steve Burgess

Other

Steve Burgess

Foley Editor

Arnold Burk

Executive Producer

Matt Butler

Photography

Francine Byrne

Art Department Coordinator

Arthur Cambridge

Grader

Otello Campanella

Other

Bruno Cesari

On-Set Dresser

Shanni Chaggar

Camera

Julius Chan

Editor

John Chavanga

Assistant Director

J P Chavrier

Property Master

Carlo Felice Cillario

Music Conductor

Katie Clarke

Accounting Assistant

Nora Cline

Scenic Artist

Franco Coduti

Production Manager

Aldo Colanzi

Key Grip

Lynda Collings

Other

Idylio Cortini

Song

Roger Cowland

Visual Effects

Roger Cowland

Other

Bill Cross

Other

Marcus D'arcy

Editor

Marcus D'arcy

Post-Production Supervisor

David Davenport

Wardrobe Supervisor

Bill Dearth

Dialect Coach

Robert Deschane

Adr Mixer

Josef Doller

Other

Gaetano Donizetti

Music

Robin Douet

Production Supervisor

Chris Ann Downes

Production Assistant

Nora Dunfee

Dialogue Consultant

Gale Edwards

Special Thanks To

Brad Einhorn

Property Master

Edward Elgar

Music

Nick Enright

Screenplay

Howard Fabrick

Special Thanks To

David Craig Forrest

Makeup Artist

Richard Francis-bruce

Editor

Johnny Friedkin

Associate Producer

Patricia A Galvin

Assistant Editor

Eileen Garrigan

Scenic Artist

Martin Garrigan

Other

Reg Garside

Gaffer

Kathleen Gerlach

Assistant Costume Designer

Joanna Gollins

Production Manager

Frika Gray

Scenic Artist

James P Gribbins

Grip

Mary Haider

Special Thanks To

Michael Haider

Special Thanks To

Bernhard Haitink

Music Conductor

Laura Hamilton

Production Assistant

Leilani Hannah

Assistant Editor

Christian Harrer

Music Conductor

Barbara Harris

Adr Voice Casting

John O Hartman

Production Assistant

Kirsten Hecktermann

Costume Supervisor

Tom Hester

Prosthetics

Ronald Lee Hiatt

Props

Richard Hickox

Music Conductor

Elizabeth Hiebner

Production Assistant

Ellen Hillers

Production Coordinator

Robin Hollister

Location Manager

David Jobe

Adr

Marla Jonas

Other

Tim Jordan

Sound Editor

Leonard Juma

Assistant Director

James D Kempf

Dresser

Canice Kennedy

Location Casting

Liz Kerry

Location Manager

Robin Knight

Key Grip

Richard Kopp

Music Conductor

Gary Kosko

Other

Frederick E Kowalo

Production Assistant

Michael Kuhling

Assistant Art Director

Dennis Kuneff

Dolly Grip

Tova Laiter

Special Thanks To

Paul Leblanc

Hair

Luis Lecarre

Special Thanks To

Jamie Leonard

Other

Pam Lewis

Scenic Artist

Rick Lisle

Assistant Editor

Annie Loeffler

Assistant Location Manager

Edwin Lohrer

On-Set Dresser

Jerry Long

Foley Editor

Paula Lourie

Assistant Editor

Katia Lund

Production Assistant

John S. Lyons

Casting

Rick Maddux

Other

Jane Maguire

Assistant Editor

Gustav Mahler

Music

Pat Mahoney

Other

Alessandro Mancini

Unit Manager

Claudio Mancini

Production Supervisor

Bobby Mancuso

Camera Assistant

Tony Manning

Grader

A Marcello

Music

Roberto Marini

Song

Linda Matthews

Wardrobe Supervisor

Michael Maxson

Props

Herman Mbugua

Cashier

Carol Mcclenahan

Location Scout

Ian Mcloughlin

Sound Mixer

Debbie Mcwilliams

Casting

Chiara Meloni

Casting

John D. Milinac

Special Effects

George Miller

Screenplay

George Miller

Producer

Michele M Misiti

Scenic Artist

Doug Mitchell

Producer

Jane Moran

Assistant Editor

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart

Music

Jimmy Muroka

Construction Manager

Fiona Musselwhite

Makeup

Andrew M Nelson

Best Boy

Barbara Nolan

Other

Danielle Norman

Assistant

Gerry Nucifora

Boom Operator

Mary M O'brien

Scenic Artist

Karen O'hara

Set Decorator

Lynn O'hare

Associate Producer

T. J. O'mara

Boom Operator

Ben Osmo

Sound Mixer

Brian Osmond

Camera Assistant

Daphne Paris

Script Supervisor

Daphne Paris

Associate Producer

Wayne Pashley

Dialogue Editor

Barbie Pastorik

Production Assistant

Philip A Patterson

Assistant Director

Paula Payne

Scenic Artist

Libor Pesek

Music Conductor

Jim Petri

Electrician

Ken Phelan

Other

Carmen Piccini

Advisor

Clay Pinney

Construction

Robert Pomeroy

Production Assistant

Beatrix Potter

Source Material

Karen Psaltis

Other

Fritz Reiner

Music Conductor

Dawn Murphy Riley

Assistant

Alvaro Romagnoli

Gaffer

John A Roush

Electrician

Jeffrey Rubis

Hair Assistant

Livia Ruzic

Dialogue Editor

Carlo Sabajno

Music Conductor

Alessandra Sampaolo

Makeup Assistant

Fred Sandusky

Location Assistant

Claudio Scimone

Music Conductor

John Seale

Director Of Photography

Andrew M Seigel

Assistant Property Master

Tullio Serafin

Music Conductor

Fabrizio Sforza

Makeup Artist

Christine Sheaks

Casting Associate

Annabelle Sheehan

Adr Editor

Allison Sherman

Production

Mario Simon

Other

Margaret Sixel

Titles

Lee Smith

Sound Design

Lee Smith

Editor

Lee Smith

Editing

Catherine Stanton

Dresser

Diana Stoughton

Assistant

Georgy Sviridov

Music

Cinzia Taffani

Production Coordinator

Neri Kyle Tannenbaum

Location Manager

Rand Templeton

Production Assistant

Paul Thompson

Key Grip

Richard Tindall

Other

Peter Townsend

Sound Editor

Elizabeth Trevan

Production Assistant

Kenneth Turek

Dresser

Alfonso Valencia

Other

Film Details

Also Known As
aceite de la vida, El
MPAA Rating
Release Date
1992
Distribution Company
Universal Pictures
Location
Washington, DC, USA; Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 20m

Award Nominations

Best Actress

1992
Susan Sarandon

Best Original Screenplay

1992

Articles

Sir Peter Ustinov (1921-2004)


Sir Peter Ustinov, the witty, multi-talented actor, director and writer whose 60-year career in entertainment included two Best Supporting Actor Oscars® for his memorable character turns in the films Spartacus and Topkapi, died of heart failure on March 28 at a clinic in Genolier, Switzerland. He was 82.

He was born Peter Alexander Ustinov on April 16, 1921 in London, England. His father was a press attache at the German embassy until 1935 - when disgusted by the Nazi regime - he took out British nationality. He attended Westminster School, an exclusive private school in central London until he was 16. He then enrolled for acting classes at the London Theater Studio, and by 1939, he made his London stage debut.

His jovial nature and strong gift for dialects made him a natural player for films, and it wasn't long after finding theatre work that Ustinov moved into motion pictures: a Dutch priest in Michael Powell's One of Our Aircraft is Missing (1941); an elderly Czech professor in Let the People Sing (1942); and a star pupil of a Nazi spy school in The Goose Steps Out (1942).

He served in the British Army for four years (1942-46), where he found his talents well utilized by the military, allowing him to join the director Sir Carol Reed on some propaganda films. He eventually earned his first screenwriting credit for The Way Ahead (1944). One of Sir Carol Reed's best films, The Way Ahead was a thrilling drama which starred David Niven as a civilian heading up a group of locals to resist an oncoming Nazi unit. It was enough of a hit to earn Ustinov his first film directorial assignment, School for Secrets (1946), a well paced drama about the discovery of radar starring Sir Ralph Richardson and Sir Richard Attenborough.

After the war, Ustinov took on another writer-director project Vice Versa (1948), a whimsical fantasy-comedy starring Roger Livesey and Anthony Newley as a father and son who magically switch personalities. Although not a huge hit of its day, the sheer buoyancy of the surreal premise has earned the film a large cult following.

Ustinov made his Hollywood debut, and garnered his first Oscar® nomination for Best Supporting Actor, as an indolent Nero in the Roman epic, Quo Vadis? (1951). After achieving some international popularity with that role, Ustinov gave some top-notch performances in quality films: the snappish Prinny in the Stewart Granger vehicle Beau Brummel (1954); holding his own against Humphrey Bogart as an escaped convict in We're No Angels (1954); the ring master who presides over the life of the lead character in Max Ophuls's resplendent Lola Montez (1955); and a garrulous settler coping with the Australian outback in The Sundowners (1960).

The '60s would be Ustinov's most fruitful decade. He started off gabbing his first Oscar® as the cunning slave dealer in Spartacus (1960); made a smooth screen adaptation by directing his smash play, Romanoff and Juliet (1961), earned critical acclaim for his co-adaptation, direction, production and performance in Herman Melville's nautical classic Billy Budd (1962); and earned a second Oscar® as the fumbling jewel thief in the crime comedy Topkapi (1964).

He scored another Oscar® nomination in the Best Original Screenplay category for his airy, clever crime romp Hot Millions (1968), in which he played a con artist who uses a computer to bilk a company out of millions of dollars; but after that, Ustinov began taking a string of offbeat character parts: the lead in one of Disney's better kiddie flicks Blackbeard's Ghost (1968); a Mexican General who wants to reclaim Texas for Mexico in Viva Max! (1969); an old man who survives the ravaged planet of the future in Logan's Run (1976); and an unfortunate turn as a Chinese stereotype in Charlie Chan and the Curse of the Dragon Queen (1981). Still, he did achieve renewed popularity when he took on the role of Hercule Poirot in the star laced, Agatha Christie extravaganza Death on the Nile (1978). He was such a hit, that he would adroitly play the Belgian detective in two more theatrical movies: Evil Under the Sun (1982) and Appointment With Death (1988); as well as three television movies: Thirteen at Dinner (1985), Murder in Three Acts, Dead Man's Folly (both 1986).

Beyond his work in films, Ustinov was justifiably praised for his humanitarian work - most notably as the unpaid, goodwill ambassador for United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF). Since 1968, he had traveled to all corners of the globe: China, Russia, Myanmar, Cambodia, Kenya, Egypt, Thailand and numerous other countries to promote and host many benefit concerts for the agency.

Ustinov, who in 1990 earned a knighthood for his artistic and humanitarian contributions, is survived by his wife of 32 years, Hélène du Lau d'Allemans; three daughters, Tamara, Pavla, Andrea; and a son, Igor.

by Michael T. Toole
Sir Peter Ustinov (1921-2004)

Sir Peter Ustinov (1921-2004)

Sir Peter Ustinov, the witty, multi-talented actor, director and writer whose 60-year career in entertainment included two Best Supporting Actor Oscars® for his memorable character turns in the films Spartacus and Topkapi, died of heart failure on March 28 at a clinic in Genolier, Switzerland. He was 82. He was born Peter Alexander Ustinov on April 16, 1921 in London, England. His father was a press attache at the German embassy until 1935 - when disgusted by the Nazi regime - he took out British nationality. He attended Westminster School, an exclusive private school in central London until he was 16. He then enrolled for acting classes at the London Theater Studio, and by 1939, he made his London stage debut. His jovial nature and strong gift for dialects made him a natural player for films, and it wasn't long after finding theatre work that Ustinov moved into motion pictures: a Dutch priest in Michael Powell's One of Our Aircraft is Missing (1941); an elderly Czech professor in Let the People Sing (1942); and a star pupil of a Nazi spy school in The Goose Steps Out (1942). He served in the British Army for four years (1942-46), where he found his talents well utilized by the military, allowing him to join the director Sir Carol Reed on some propaganda films. He eventually earned his first screenwriting credit for The Way Ahead (1944). One of Sir Carol Reed's best films, The Way Ahead was a thrilling drama which starred David Niven as a civilian heading up a group of locals to resist an oncoming Nazi unit. It was enough of a hit to earn Ustinov his first film directorial assignment, School for Secrets (1946), a well paced drama about the discovery of radar starring Sir Ralph Richardson and Sir Richard Attenborough. After the war, Ustinov took on another writer-director project Vice Versa (1948), a whimsical fantasy-comedy starring Roger Livesey and Anthony Newley as a father and son who magically switch personalities. Although not a huge hit of its day, the sheer buoyancy of the surreal premise has earned the film a large cult following. Ustinov made his Hollywood debut, and garnered his first Oscar® nomination for Best Supporting Actor, as an indolent Nero in the Roman epic, Quo Vadis? (1951). After achieving some international popularity with that role, Ustinov gave some top-notch performances in quality films: the snappish Prinny in the Stewart Granger vehicle Beau Brummel (1954); holding his own against Humphrey Bogart as an escaped convict in We're No Angels (1954); the ring master who presides over the life of the lead character in Max Ophuls's resplendent Lola Montez (1955); and a garrulous settler coping with the Australian outback in The Sundowners (1960). The '60s would be Ustinov's most fruitful decade. He started off gabbing his first Oscar® as the cunning slave dealer in Spartacus (1960); made a smooth screen adaptation by directing his smash play, Romanoff and Juliet (1961), earned critical acclaim for his co-adaptation, direction, production and performance in Herman Melville's nautical classic Billy Budd (1962); and earned a second Oscar® as the fumbling jewel thief in the crime comedy Topkapi (1964). He scored another Oscar® nomination in the Best Original Screenplay category for his airy, clever crime romp Hot Millions (1968), in which he played a con artist who uses a computer to bilk a company out of millions of dollars; but after that, Ustinov began taking a string of offbeat character parts: the lead in one of Disney's better kiddie flicks Blackbeard's Ghost (1968); a Mexican General who wants to reclaim Texas for Mexico in Viva Max! (1969); an old man who survives the ravaged planet of the future in Logan's Run (1976); and an unfortunate turn as a Chinese stereotype in Charlie Chan and the Curse of the Dragon Queen (1981). Still, he did achieve renewed popularity when he took on the role of Hercule Poirot in the star laced, Agatha Christie extravaganza Death on the Nile (1978). He was such a hit, that he would adroitly play the Belgian detective in two more theatrical movies: Evil Under the Sun (1982) and Appointment With Death (1988); as well as three television movies: Thirteen at Dinner (1985), Murder in Three Acts, Dead Man's Folly (both 1986). Beyond his work in films, Ustinov was justifiably praised for his humanitarian work - most notably as the unpaid, goodwill ambassador for United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF). Since 1968, he had traveled to all corners of the globe: China, Russia, Myanmar, Cambodia, Kenya, Egypt, Thailand and numerous other countries to promote and host many benefit concerts for the agency. Ustinov, who in 1990 earned a knighthood for his artistic and humanitarian contributions, is survived by his wife of 32 years, Hélène du Lau d'Allemans; three daughters, Tamara, Pavla, Andrea; and a son, Igor. by Michael T. Toole

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Nominated by the Hollywood Foreign Press Association for a Golden Globe (1992) award for best actress -- drama (Susan Sarandon).

Expanded Release in United States January 15, 1993

Released in United States on Video July 14, 1993

Released in United States Winter December 30, 1992

Susan Sarandon replaced Michelle Pfeiffer.

Began shooting September 9, 1991.

Completed shooting December 12, 1991.

Expanded Release in United States January 15, 1993

Released in United States on Video July 14, 1993

Released in United States Winter December 30, 1992