Lonely Hearts


1h 35m 1982
Lonely Hearts

Brief Synopsis

An unlikely romance develops between a piano tuner and a timid office worker.

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Genre
Comedy
Romance
Drama
Release Date
1982

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 35m

Synopsis

An unlikely romance develops between a piano tuner and a timid office worker.

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Genre
Comedy
Romance
Drama
Release Date
1982

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 35m

Articles

Lonely Hearts


Paul Cox is more praised outside of Australia than within it. Like that other prolific iconoclast Werner Herzog, Cox's career intersperses feature work with nearly as many documentaries, and in many ways this movie about a burgeoning romance between piano tuner (and shoplifter) Peter (Norman Kaye) and mousy bank teller Patricia (seminal Australian actor Wendy Hughes ) feels like a documentary in its close, keen, and sensitive observation of their romance. Both Peter and Patricia are recently liberated from their parents -- he from looking after his recently deceased mother, she because she's finally moved out of her oppressive parents' house -- and their timid romance is full of tender, tentative steps out of isolation and into self-assertion. Shot with a tweedy, muted palette, like a Vermeer, this movie reflects Cox's gentleness and respect towards actors -- he famously refuses to make them screen test for any role because he fears the process is "humiliating and degrading". Named "Best Film of 1982" by the Australian Film Institute.

By Violet LeVoit
Lonely Hearts

Lonely Hearts

Paul Cox is more praised outside of Australia than within it. Like that other prolific iconoclast Werner Herzog, Cox's career intersperses feature work with nearly as many documentaries, and in many ways this movie about a burgeoning romance between piano tuner (and shoplifter) Peter (Norman Kaye) and mousy bank teller Patricia (seminal Australian actor Wendy Hughes ) feels like a documentary in its close, keen, and sensitive observation of their romance. Both Peter and Patricia are recently liberated from their parents -- he from looking after his recently deceased mother, she because she's finally moved out of her oppressive parents' house -- and their timid romance is full of tender, tentative steps out of isolation and into self-assertion. Shot with a tweedy, muted palette, like a Vermeer, this movie reflects Cox's gentleness and respect towards actors -- he famously refuses to make them screen test for any role because he fears the process is "humiliating and degrading". Named "Best Film of 1982" by the Australian Film Institute. By Violet LeVoit

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Winner of the 1982 AFI Award for Best Picture.

Released in United States 1982

Released in United States 1982