The Lone Wolf Keeps a Date


1h 5m 1940
The Lone Wolf Keeps a Date

Brief Synopsis

A reformed thief tracks down a missing stamp collection and a kidnapped businessman.

Film Details

Also Known As
Alias the Lone Wolf, Revenge of the Lone Wolf
Genre
Mystery
Release Date
Nov 23, 1940
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Columbia Pictures Corp.
Distribution Company
Columbia Pictures Corp.
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on characters created by Louis Joseph Vance.

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 5m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
8 reels

Synopsis

Michael Lanyard, a reformed jewel thief known as The Lone Wolf, and his butler, Jamison, are on their way to the Havana airport for their trip back to Miami, where they intend to attend a stamp collectors' convention. Moments before leaving Cuba, however, Lanyard and Jamison witness Patricia Lawrence being forced into a car by two men. They come to her aid, but in the melee, the men steal Lanyard's valuable stamp collection and disappear. Patricia later tells Lanyard that the men were after the $100,000 ransom money she was carrying for the release of kidnapped millionaire Cyrus Colby. She also admits that she was planning to use the money to buy the testimony of an old Portuguese man who was going to identify the real kidnappers and thus exonerate her fiancé Scotty, who has been accused of the crime. After convincing Patricia to allow him to handle the case, and eluding Inspector Crane, who believes he is involved in the kidnapping, Lanyard, Jamison and Patricia visit the old Portuguese man. Just as he is about to utter the kidnappers' names, however, a shot rings out and he is killed. In the ensuing scuffle, Lanyard is captured by the kidnappers, but Jamison and Patricia escape unharmed. Taken to Big Joe Brady's casino, Lanyard offers to cut Joe in on the ransom if he allows Jamison to come and pick up Lanyard's stamp collection. When Jamison arrives, Lanyard instructs him to enter the stamps in the Miami convention, but to pay special attention to the Cuban stamps. Unable to find the convention, Jamison examines the Cuban stamps more closely and finds a secret message inscribed by Lanyard. On the stamp, Jamison reads that Colby is being held prisoner on Sandy Key, and that he is to decoy the police there. Jamison follows Lanyard's instructions and leads the police on a chase to the key, where they soon find and arrest Big Joe and his henchmen. The police find the ransom on Big Joe and immediately release Scotty.

Film Details

Also Known As
Alias the Lone Wolf, Revenge of the Lone Wolf
Genre
Mystery
Release Date
Nov 23, 1940
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Columbia Pictures Corp.
Distribution Company
Columbia Pictures Corp.
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on characters created by Louis Joseph Vance.

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 5m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
8 reels

Articles

The Lone Wolf Keeps a Date


Everyone loves a lovable rogue, whether the cad in question be Arsène Lupin, A. J. Raffles, Jimmy Dale (aka The Gray Seal), Simon Templar (aka The Saint) or Michael Lanyard, an urbane jewel thief created by novelist Louis Joseph Vance in 1914 and known to his moneyed victims and the authorities alike as The Lone Wolf. Hollywood was quick to jump on the cinematic possibilities of the character, with Bert Lytell playing Lanyard as early as 1917. Lytell would return to the role in several more silent outings, with Columbia Pictures ultimately purchasing rights to the material and hanging Lanyard's cutaway coat and celluloid collar on such actors as Henry B. Walthall, Melvyn Douglas, and Francis Lederer before giving the character his own film series. With the Second World War looming in Europe, Columbia drafted The Lone Wolf into the good fight by having star Warren William (a veteran of several Perry Mason and Philo Vance films) alternating grand larceny with spy smashing in The Lone Wolf Spy Hunt (1939). William would appear in a total of nine Lone Wolf films, of which The Lone Wolf Keeps a Date (1940) was his fourth. Co-written by director Sidney Salkow and studio scenarist Earl Felton (later author of the scripts for the film noir classics Armored Car Robbery [1950] and The Narrow Margin [1952]), The Lone Wolf Keeps a Date is among the better written films in the franchise, with Lanyard finding himself again caught between the law (personified by Thurston Hall and Fred Kelsey) and a gang of underworld cutthroats (led by Don Beddoe and Lester Matthews) when he comes to the aid of a beautiful lady (Frances Robinson).

by Richard Harland Smith
The Lone Wolf Keeps A Date

The Lone Wolf Keeps a Date

Everyone loves a lovable rogue, whether the cad in question be Arsène Lupin, A. J. Raffles, Jimmy Dale (aka The Gray Seal), Simon Templar (aka The Saint) or Michael Lanyard, an urbane jewel thief created by novelist Louis Joseph Vance in 1914 and known to his moneyed victims and the authorities alike as The Lone Wolf. Hollywood was quick to jump on the cinematic possibilities of the character, with Bert Lytell playing Lanyard as early as 1917. Lytell would return to the role in several more silent outings, with Columbia Pictures ultimately purchasing rights to the material and hanging Lanyard's cutaway coat and celluloid collar on such actors as Henry B. Walthall, Melvyn Douglas, and Francis Lederer before giving the character his own film series. With the Second World War looming in Europe, Columbia drafted The Lone Wolf into the good fight by having star Warren William (a veteran of several Perry Mason and Philo Vance films) alternating grand larceny with spy smashing in The Lone Wolf Spy Hunt (1939). William would appear in a total of nine Lone Wolf films, of which The Lone Wolf Keeps a Date (1940) was his fourth. Co-written by director Sidney Salkow and studio scenarist Earl Felton (later author of the scripts for the film noir classics Armored Car Robbery [1950] and The Narrow Margin [1952]), The Lone Wolf Keeps a Date is among the better written films in the franchise, with Lanyard finding himself again caught between the law (personified by Thurston Hall and Fred Kelsey) and a gang of underworld cutthroats (led by Don Beddoe and Lester Matthews) when he comes to the aid of a beautiful lady (Frances Robinson). by Richard Harland Smith

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

Working titles for this film were Alias the Lone Wolf and Revenge of the Lone Wolf. The onscreen credits read: "Based on a work by Louis Joseph Vance." For more information on the "The Lone Wolf" series, see the entry below for The Lone Wolf Spy Hunt and consult the Series Index.