The Little Mermaid


1h 23m 1989

Brief Synopsis

Mermaid princess Ariel will do anything to walk on dry land and fall in love. But her deal with the magical Sea Hag backfires and causes trouble only Ariel can fix.

Film Details

Also Known As
De Kleine Zeemeermin, Den lilla Sjöjungfrun - sv. tal, Die Meerjungfrau, Kleine Zeemeermin, La Petite Sirene, La Sirenita, La Sirinetta, Little Mermaid, Meerjungfrau, Die, Petite Sirene, La, Sirenita, Sirinetta
MPAA Rating
Release Date
1989
Distribution Company
Walt Disney Studios Distribution; Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures
Location
Los Angeles, California, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 23m

Synopsis

Mermaid princess Ariel will do anything to walk on dry land and fall in love. But her deal with the magical Sea Hag backfires and causes trouble only Ariel can fix.

Crew

John Aardal

Camera

Sue Adnopoz

Graphics

Monica Albracht

Other

Gretchen Maschmeyer Albrecht

Animator

Renee Alcazar

Other

Joyce Alexander

Other

Francesca Allen

Other

Ron D Allen

Production Assistant

Roger Allers

Storyboard Artist

Kathy Altieri

Background Artist

Leyla C Amaro

Other

Hans Christian Andersen

Other

Scott Anderson

Other

Tony Anselmo

Animator

Ruben Azama Aquino

Animation Director

W L Arance

Art Department

Debra Armstrong

Graphics

Dorothy Aronica-mckim

Assistant

Dorothy Aronica-mckim

Background Artist

Kelly Asbury

Visual Effects Designer

Howard Ashman

Screenplay

Howard Ashman

Writer (Dialogue)

Howard Ashman

Song

Howard Ashman

Producer

Errol Aubry

Camera

Ed Austin

Camera

Rasoul Azadani

Layout Artist

Lada Babicka

Other

Chris Bailey

Animator

Kathleen M Bailey

Graphics

Bette Isis Baker

Other

Dorothea Baker

Other

Tina Baldwin

Other

Doug Ball

Background Artist

Jim Ballantine

Other

Sue Barnes

Graphics

Philo Barnhart

Other

Arland Barron

Effects Assistant

Mark Barrows

Effects Assistant

James Baxter

Animator

Chris Beck

Camera

James Beihold

Layout Artist

Carl A Bell

Graphics

Kathleen Bennett

Music Editor

Bill Berg

Other

Dorris Bergstrom

Other

Phyllis Bird

Other

Russell Blandino

Other

Bonnie Blough

Other

Allen Blyth

Effects Assistant

Geefwee Boedoe

Effects Assistant

David A Bossert

Animator

Dan Boulos

Other

Ash Brannon

Animator

Ashley Brannon

Other

Jo Ann Breuer

Camera Operator

Jerry Lee Brice

Other

Kris Brown

Other

Sheila Brown

Other

Jan Browning

Other

Janet Bruce

Digital Effects Supervisor

Robert Bryan

Other

Chris Buck

Other

Mary Buck

Casting

Bonnie Buckner

Production Assistant

Susan Burke

Other

Marlene Burkhart

Other

Tania Burton

Other

Jason Buski

Other

Charles L Campbell

Sound Editor

John L Carnochan

Executive Editor

Douglas Eugene Casper

Other

Irma Cataya

Other

Michael Cedeno

Animator

Dan Chaika

Effects Assistant

Glenn Chaika

Animator

Brenda Chapman

Storyboard Artist

Greg Chin

Other

Karen China

Other

Marc S Christenson

Layout Artist

Christopher Chu

Graphics

Wesley Chun

Other

Mimi Frances Clayton

Other

Ron Clements

Screenplay

Brian Clift

Other

Fred Cline

Layout Artist

Merry Kanawyer Clingen

Inbetweener

Warren Coffman

Other

Bob Cohen

Other

Jim Coleman

Background Artist

Chris Conklin

Other

Barry Cook

Animator

Donovan R Cook

Production Assistant

Jesus Cortes

Other

Elrene Cowan

Color

Patti Cowling

Other

Elena Marie Cox

Other

Fred Craig

Layout Artist

Laura Craig

Other

Margaret Craig-chang

Effects Assistant

Lee Crowe

Other

Lynnette Cullen

Other

Kent Culotta

Graphics

John R Cunningham

Digital Effects Supervisor

David Cutler

Animator

Sybil Cuzzort

Other

Florida M D'ambrosio

Other

Sharon M Dabek

Other

Eleanor Dahlen

Other

Steve Damiani

Animator

Marge Daniels

Graphics

James A Davis

Other

Humberto De La Fuente

Effects Assistant

Andreas Deja

Other

Andreas Deja

Animation Director

Lou Dellarosa

Other

Anthony Derosa

Animator

Rose Dibucci

Other

Diana Dixon

Other

Maureen Donley

Production Manager

Maureen Donley

Associate Producer

Marcia Kimura Dougherty

Graphics

Greg Drolette

Background Artist

Debbie Dubois

Other

Jean A Dubois

Other

Natasha Dukelski Selfridge

Graphics

Lee Dunkman

Graphics

Eileen Dunn

Other

Dennis Durrell

Background Artist

Susan Edelman

Casting

Louis L Edemann

Sound Editor

Russ Edmonds

Animator

Dennis Edwards

Post-Production

Dennis Edwards

Assistant

Gary Eggleston

Visual Effects Designer

Teresa Eidenbock

Graphics

Tom Ellery

Other

Tom Ellery

Other

Sutherland C Ellwood

Other

Sutherland C Ellwood

Assistant

John Emerson

Art Department

Janet English

Other

Thom Enriquez

Storyboard Artist

Betsy Ergenbright

Color

Shannon Fallis-kane

Other

Rick Farmiloe

Animator

Maria Fenyvesi

Other

Tom Ferriter

Other

Phyllis Estelle Fields

Other

Joshua Finkel

Other

Cindy Finn

Color

Will Finn

Animator

Gareth Fishbaugh

Other

Mark Fisher

Other

Eve Fletcher

Other

Gail Frank

Other

Richard C Franklin

Sound Editor

Natalie Franscioni

Other

Joyce Frey

Other

Tony Fucile

Animator

James Fujii

Other

June M Fujimoto

Other

Randy Fullmer

Animator

Bernie Gagliano

Graphics

Cindy Garcia

Other

Paulino Garcia

Other

Rene Garcia

Layout Artist

Andy Gaskill

Visual Effects Designer

Chuck Gefre

Other

Mike Genz

Graphics

Mac George

Layout Artist

Barbara Gerety

Assistant Editor

Lenny Geschke

Sound Editor

Mabel Gesner

Effects Assistant

Kathy Gilmore

Other

Theresa Gilroy

Sound

Ed Gombert

Storyboard Artist

Ed Gombert

Other

Maria Gonzalez

Other

Dean Gordon

Background Artist

Daniel A Gracey

Other

Gerritt Graham

Screenplay

Gerritt Graham

Writer (Dialogue)

Samuel Graham

Screenplay

Samuel Graham

Writer (Dialogue)

Peggy Gregory

Other

Wilma L Guenot

Other

Peter A Gullerud

Other

Carolyn Guske

Color

Ed Gutierrez

Other

Roncie Hantke

Camera

Karen Hardenbergh

Other

Christine Harding

Animator

Ray Harris

Graphics

Chuck Harvey

Animator

Daniel Haskett

Other

Brett Hayden

Production Coordinator

Anne Hazard

Other

Chris Hecox

Art Assistant

Mark Henn

Animation Director

Film Details

Also Known As
De Kleine Zeemeermin, Den lilla Sjöjungfrun - sv. tal, Die Meerjungfrau, Kleine Zeemeermin, La Petite Sirene, La Sirenita, La Sirinetta, Little Mermaid, Meerjungfrau, Die, Petite Sirene, La, Sirenita, Sirinetta
MPAA Rating
Release Date
1989
Distribution Company
Walt Disney Studios Distribution; Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures
Location
Los Angeles, California, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 23m

Award Wins

Best Score

1989

Best Song

1989

Award Nominations

Best Song

1989

Articles

Hamilton Camp (1934-2005)


Hamilton Camp, the diminutive yet effervescent actor and singer-songwriter, who spent nearly his entire life in show business, including several appearances in both television and films, died of a heart attack on October 2 at his Los Angeles home. He was 70.

He was born October 30, 1934, in London, England. After World War II, he moved to Canada and then to Long Beach with his mother and sister, where the siblings performed in USO shows. In 1946, he made his first movie, Bedlam starring Boris Karloff as an extra (as Bobby Camp) and continued in that vein until he played Thorpe, one of Dean Stockwell's classmates in Kim (1950).

After Kim he received some more slightly prominent parts in films: a messenger boy in Titanic (1953); and a mailroom attendant in Executive Suite (1954), but overall, Camp was never a steadily working child actor.

Camp relocated to Chicago in the late '50s and rediscovered his childhood passion - music. He began playing in small clubs around the Chicago area, and he struck oil when he partnered with a New York based folk artist, Bob Gibson in 1961. The pair worked in clubs all over the midwest and they soon became known for their tight vocal harmonies and Gibson's 12-string guitar style. Late in 1961, they recorded an album - Gibson and Camp at the Gate of Horn, the Gate of Horn being the most renowned music venue in Chicago for the burgeoning folk scene. The record may have aged a bit over the years, but it is admired as an important progress in folk music by most scholars, particularly as a missing link between the classic era of Woody Guthrie and the modern singer-songwriter genre populated by Bob Dylan and Joan Baez.

Gibson and Camp would split within two years, and after recording some albums as a solo artist and a brief stint with Chicago's famed Second City improvisational comedy troupe, Camp struck out on his own to work as an actor in Los Angeles. His changed his name to Hamilton from Bob, and despite his lack of vertical presence (he stood only 5-foot-2), his boundless energy and quick wit made him handy to guest star in a string of familiar sitcoms of the late '60s: The Monkees, Bewitched, and Love, American Style. By the '70s there was no stopping him as he appeared on virtually every popular comedy of the day: The Mary Tyler Moore Show, M*A*S*H, Laverne & Shirley, Three's Company, and WKRP in Cincinnati.

Eventually, Camp's film roles improved too, and he did his best film work in the latter stages of his career: Blake Edward's undisciplined but still funny S.O.B. (1981); Paul Bartel's glorious cult comedy Eating Raoul (1982); and Clint Eastwood's jazz biopic on Charlie Parker Bird (1988). Among his recent work was a guest spot last season as a carpenter on Desperate Housewives, and his recent completion of a Las Vegas based comedy Hard Four which is currently in post-production. Camp is survived by six children and thirteen grandchildren.

by Michael T. Toole
Hamilton Camp (1934-2005)

Hamilton Camp (1934-2005)

Hamilton Camp, the diminutive yet effervescent actor and singer-songwriter, who spent nearly his entire life in show business, including several appearances in both television and films, died of a heart attack on October 2 at his Los Angeles home. He was 70. He was born October 30, 1934, in London, England. After World War II, he moved to Canada and then to Long Beach with his mother and sister, where the siblings performed in USO shows. In 1946, he made his first movie, Bedlam starring Boris Karloff as an extra (as Bobby Camp) and continued in that vein until he played Thorpe, one of Dean Stockwell's classmates in Kim (1950). After Kim he received some more slightly prominent parts in films: a messenger boy in Titanic (1953); and a mailroom attendant in Executive Suite (1954), but overall, Camp was never a steadily working child actor. Camp relocated to Chicago in the late '50s and rediscovered his childhood passion - music. He began playing in small clubs around the Chicago area, and he struck oil when he partnered with a New York based folk artist, Bob Gibson in 1961. The pair worked in clubs all over the midwest and they soon became known for their tight vocal harmonies and Gibson's 12-string guitar style. Late in 1961, they recorded an album - Gibson and Camp at the Gate of Horn, the Gate of Horn being the most renowned music venue in Chicago for the burgeoning folk scene. The record may have aged a bit over the years, but it is admired as an important progress in folk music by most scholars, particularly as a missing link between the classic era of Woody Guthrie and the modern singer-songwriter genre populated by Bob Dylan and Joan Baez. Gibson and Camp would split within two years, and after recording some albums as a solo artist and a brief stint with Chicago's famed Second City improvisational comedy troupe, Camp struck out on his own to work as an actor in Los Angeles. His changed his name to Hamilton from Bob, and despite his lack of vertical presence (he stood only 5-foot-2), his boundless energy and quick wit made him handy to guest star in a string of familiar sitcoms of the late '60s: The Monkees, Bewitched, and Love, American Style. By the '70s there was no stopping him as he appeared on virtually every popular comedy of the day: The Mary Tyler Moore Show, M*A*S*H, Laverne & Shirley, Three's Company, and WKRP in Cincinnati. Eventually, Camp's film roles improved too, and he did his best film work in the latter stages of his career: Blake Edward's undisciplined but still funny S.O.B. (1981); Paul Bartel's glorious cult comedy Eating Raoul (1982); and Clint Eastwood's jazz biopic on Charlie Parker Bird (1988). Among his recent work was a guest spot last season as a carpenter on Desperate Housewives, and his recent completion of a Las Vegas based comedy Hard Four which is currently in post-production. Camp is survived by six children and thirteen grandchildren. by Michael T. Toole

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Fall November 15, 1989

Released in United States November 1997

Released in United States on Video May 18, 1990

Wide Release in United States November 17, 1989

Shown at Heartland Film Festival in Indianapolis, IN November 5-9, 1997.

Began shooting January 1988.

The 28th animated feature to carry the Disney name.

Re-releasd in USA Novmber 14-30, 1997.

Released in United States on Video May 18, 1990

Released in United States November 1997 (Shown at Heartland Film Festival in Indianapolis, IN November 5-9, 1997.)

Released in United States Fall November 15, 1989

Wide Release in United States November 17, 1989