Hugo


2h 6m 2011
Hugo

Brief Synopsis

When wily and resourceful Hugo discovers a secret left by his father, he unlocks a mystery and embarks on a quest that will transform those around him and lead to a safe and loving place he can call home.

Film Details

Also Known As
Hugo Cabret, Hugo Cabret (auch in 3D), Invention of Hugo Cabret, The
MPAA Rating
Genre
Drama
Adventure
Family
Mystery
Period
Adaptation
Release Date
2011
Distribution Company
Paramount Pictures
Location
Paris, France; London, England, United Kingdom; Shepperton Studios, Shepperton, Middlesex, England, United Kingdom

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 6m

Synopsis

12-year-old Hugo lives in the walls of a busy Paris train station, his survival depending on secrets and anonymity. When he gets involved with an eccentric girl and the owner of the station's toy booth, his undercover life is put in jeopardy.

Crew

Janine Abery

Film Lab

Sheara Abrahams

Costumer

Jan Adamczyk

Digital Artist

Matt Akey

3-D Animator

Danny Albano

Digital Effects

Casey Allen

Visual Effects

Ana Alvarado

Animator

Holli Alvarado

Visual Effects

Xuzhen An

Compositor

Jaroslaw Ancuta

Rotoscope Artist

Katarzyna Ancuta

Compositor

Daphne Apellanes

Matte Painter

Beulah Baptist Archer

Hairdresser

Jan Archibald

Hair

Oliver Arnold

Visual Effects

Tim Aslam

Assistant Costume Designer

Olivia Aubry

Researcher

Ando Avila

Compositor

Aurelie Avram

Extras Agent/Coordinator

Amy Baer

Music

Jamie Baker

Foley Editor

Stephen Baker

Animator

Emmanuelle Balestrieri

Production Accountant

David Balfour

Property Master

Scott Balkcom

Visual Effects

Randall Balsmeyer

Titles

Cassandra Barbour

Rights & Clearances

Ken Barley

Plasterer

Craig Barron

Matte Painter

Katrina Barton

Visual Effects Coordinator

Geeta Basantani

Matte Painter

Tristan Battersby

Production Assistant

Jeremy Howard Beck

Music

Joe Beirne

Film Lab

Emma Bendell

Production Controller

Danielle Bennett

Assistant Director

Kitty Bennett

Apprentice

Tyler Bennink

Production Supervisor

Irina Bennoit

Cgi Artist

Kate Benton

Makeup Artist

Mat Bergel

Propman

Christine Bergren

Rights & Clearances

Felix Bernard

Song

Jean-michel Bernard

Song Performer

John Bernard

Line Producer

Brian Berringer

Matte Painter

Annalyn Betinol

Rotoscope Artist

Karen Bicknell

Payroll Accountant

Jason Bidwell

Compositor

Dani Biernat

Stunt Double

Jürgen Bilstein

Visual Effects

Johnny S Black

Song

Michelle Blok

Visual Effects

Johannes Bogenhauser

Compositor

Sebastian Bommersheim

Compositor

Mick Booys

Special Effects

Rene Borst

Matte Painter

Jerome Boussier

Location Manager

Dennis Bovington

Carpenter

Joe Bovington

Production

Anthony Bowden

Visual Effects

Marianne Bower

Researcher

Richard Bradshaw

Stunt Coordinator

Colin Brady

Visual Effects

Franz Brandstaetter

Compositor

Tom Brewster

Assistant Director

Simon Britnell

Visual Effects

Scott Brock

Associate Editor

Emma Brofjorden

Compositor

Paul Brown

Lighting Technician

Rob Brown

Assistant

John Brubaker

Compositor

Boris Bruchhaus

Digital Effects Artist

Eric Bruhwiler

Visual Effects

Ann Buchanan

Makeup Artist

Nicola Buck

Makeup

Frederick Buhagiar

Special Effects

Jaap Buitendijk

Still Photographer

Andy Bunce

Special Effects

Chorley Bunce

Caterer

Linus Burghardt

Compositor

Lorraine Burn

Seamstress Supervisor

Tom Burton

Digital Effects

James Busby

Rigging Electrician

Ross Busby

Electrician

Sebastian Butenberg

Digital Artist

Erin Collins Butler

Matte Painter

Hamza Butt

Cgi Artist

Miguel Diaz Cachero

Digital Artist

Karl Caffrey

Travel Coordinator

Maria Cecilia Cafiero

Apprentice

Paul Campion

Matte Painter

Yingchun Cao

Cgi Artist

Tristan Carlisle-kitz

Propman

Melanie Carter

Tailor

Donna Casey

Accounting Assistant

Gilles Castera

Production Manager

James M Cavanass

Song

Irfan Celik

Visual Effects

Chris Centrella

Key Grip

John Chamberlain

Production

Martin Chamney

Visual Effects Supervisor

Kam Chan

Foley Editor

Chris Chang

Cgi Artist

Craig Charland

Post-Production Assistant

Red Charyszyn

Assistant Editor

Red Charyszyn

Visual Effects Editor

Zhongwei Chen

Matchmove Artist

Cheng Cheng

Rotoscope Artist

Karen Cheng

Compositor

Yong Cheng

Matchmove Artist

Ali Cherkaoui

Assistant Director

Ricky Cheung

Compositor

Colin Childs

Models

Wally Chin

Rotoscope Artist

Frederick Cholewa

Visual Effects

Darren Christie

Compositor

Henry Christopher

Wardrobe

Joel Christopher

Apprentice

Aldo Ciccolini

Song Performer

Genevieve Claire

Production Assistant

Robert Clarke

Rigging Electrician

Trent Claus

Visual Effects

Marisa Clayton

Film Lab

Liz Colbert

Graphic Designer

Marlon Cole

Property Master

Doug Coleman

Stunt Coordinator

Tommaso Colognese

Assistant

Miodrag Colombo

Digital Artist

Zez Confrey

Song Performer

Darren Connock

Production

Olivier Constantin

Song Performer

Florence Cossutta

Makeup

Marko Costanzo

Foley Artist

Elizabeth Cotnoir

Song

Elizabeth Cotnoir

Production Manager

William Coubrough

Art Department

Maddy Couch

Stand-In

David Coupland

Office Assistant

Steve Court

Plasterer

Robb Crafer

Apprentice

Talila Craig

Stunt Double

Stephane Cressend

Art Director

Kelley Cribben

Post-Production Supervisor

David Crockett

Executive Producer

Simon Crook

Unit Manager

Ben Crosby

Painter

Gary Crosby

Painter

Noemie Cruciani

Compositor

Simon Cullen

Rigging Electrician

Allison Cummings

Rights & Clearances

Janine Cunliffe

Costumer

Enrico Damm

Digital Artist

David Davenport

Costume Supervisor

Howard Davidson

Grip

Peter Davies

Generator Operator

Darryl Davy

Assistant

Mathilde De Cagny

Animal Trainer

Barbara De Fina

Executive Producer

Marco De Magalhaes

Costumer

François-louis Delfolie

Costume Supervisor

Emmanuel Delis

Set Decorator

Christi Dembrowski

Executive Producer

Max Dennison

Matte Painter

Johnny Depp

Producer

Bebe Dierken

Assistant Camera

Stuart Digby

Special Effects

Diana Dill

Script Supervisor

Doris Ding

Rotoscope Artist

John Dinh

Compositor

Laura Dishington

Graphic Designer

Damian Doennig

Visual Effects

Tobias Dommer

Cgi Artist

Brendan Donnison

Casting

David Doran

Assistant Art Director

Peter Dorme

Assistant Art Director

Clive Drinkall

Production

Judy Ducker

Art Department

Dean Dunham

Painter

Jennifer Dunnington

Music Editor

Julien Dupuy

Matte Painter

Mike Durkan

Special Effects

Joseph Eapen

Matchmove Artist

Benjamin L Edwards

Crane Grip

Stephen Edwards

Rotoscope Artist

Tony Edwards

Special Effects

Lee Eldred

Lighting Technician

Karen Elliott

Music Coordinator

Steve Emerson

Stunt Double

Volker Engel

Visual Effects

Ludovic Erbelding

Construction Manager

Denny Ertanto

Compositor

Tyler Esselstrom

Visual Effects

Christopher Evans

Matte Painter

Gary Roy Evans

Electric

John Evans

Software Engineer

Thilo Ewers

Matte Painter

Kathy Ewings

Payroll Accountant

Maeve Eydmann

Matchmove Artist

Ross Fall

Film Lab

Film Details

Also Known As
Hugo Cabret, Hugo Cabret (auch in 3D), Invention of Hugo Cabret, The
MPAA Rating
Genre
Drama
Adventure
Family
Mystery
Period
Adaptation
Release Date
2011
Distribution Company
Paramount Pictures
Location
Paris, France; London, England, United Kingdom; Shepperton Studios, Shepperton, Middlesex, England, United Kingdom

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 6m

Award Wins

Best Cinematography

2011
Robert Richardson

Articles

Hugo


Martin Scorsese has always been a student of the cinema. He cherishes its history, educates on and illuminates it whenever he can, and fights to preserve it as much as any preservation society can boast. It was, thus, natural that Scorsese would want to adapt Brian Selznick's beautifully illustrated and richly detailed novel, The Invention of Hugo Cabret, for the screen when he directed Hugo in 2011. The story of a small boy maintaining the clocks in the Gare Montparnasse railway station in Paris in 1931, finds its way into film history and art, and the importance of preservation, and how a young person's discovery of the past can have a profound influence on the direction of their life.

The story of Hugo begins with Hugo Cabret (Asa Butterfield) in the railway station maintaining the clocks. We quickly find out that Hugo's father, played by Jude Law, was a clockmaker himself and excitedly taught Hugo how to fix clocks, automatons, and other mechanical curiosities of the day. When Hugo's father died, he was put into the care of his Uncle Claude (Ray Winstone), the actual person tasked with the clock maintenance in the station. When Claude disappears, Hugo maintains the clocks in secret, fearing if the authorities find out his uncle is gone, he will be sent away as an orphan. How all of this relates to the archives of Georges Méliès is a part of the joy in watching the movie and following the story. Scorsese films the montage of Méliès' flickering cinematic miracles with all the love of an archivist and teacher whose dual purpose is to enlighten and inspire.

The cast of Hugo included two child actors, Butterfield and Chloë Grace Moretz, already old hands at showbiz by their early teens. Butterfield had made four movies prior and Moretz had achieved fame in the controversial role of Hit Girl in Kick-Ass (2010). But with Hugo they moved into a new dimension, playing two lost souls who bond over the discovery of a rich, hidden past. And while the film has an array of talented stars filling its cast, from Ben Kingsley and Jude Law to Christopher Lee and Sacha Baron Cohen, it is Butterfield and Moretz that hold the story together and carry the movie effortlessly on their shoulders.

Once released, the movie did not have immediate success. The critics loved it, and when awards season rolled around, it was greeted with multiple accolades, including eleven Academy Award nominations. But the box office just wasn't there. Oh, it wasn't bad, totaling almost 200 million worldwide, but with a production and marketing budget that combined for close to 300 million, that wasn't nearly enough to save it from being labeled a flop. Interestingly, a part of the financial problems came with the filming techniques used, specifically 3-D. It was Scorsese's first foray into the trendy process which ended up slowing down production while at the same time inflating ticket prices that kept audiences away. Despite 3-D being touted as a mainstay, every 30 years or so when it comes back around, it never seems worth it. And it never seems to become a mainstay. By the end of the second decade of the 21st century, it was already, once again, left for dead.

But Hugo is not. Despite its box office failure, it's a movie with tremendous staying power and one of the best of Scorsese's recent films career. Scorsese has always loved the cinema and this movie is, in no small part, a love letter to the movies that have defined his life.

Directed by Martin Scorsese
Written by John Logan
Produced by David Crockett, Barbara De Fina, Christi Dembrowski, Johnny Depp , Tim Headington, Georgia Kacandes
Cast: Ben Kingsley (Georges Méliès), Sacha Baron Cohen (Station Inspector), Asa Butterfield (Hugo Cabret), Chloë Grace Moretz (Isabelle), Ray Winstone (Uncle Claude), Emily Mortimer (Lisette), Christopher Lee (Monsieur Labisse), Helen McCrory (Mama Jeanne), Michael Stuhlbarg (Rene Tabard), Frances de la Tour (Madame Emilie), Richard Griffiths (Monsieur Frick), Jude Law (Hugo's Father)
Music by Howard Shore
Cinematography by Robert Richardson
Film Editing by Thelma Schoonmaker
Casting by Ellen Lewis
Production Design by Dante Ferretti
Art Direction by Martin Foley, Christian Huband, Rod McLean, Stuart Rose, Luca Tranchino, David Warren
Set Decoration by Francesca Lo Schiavo
Costume Design by Sandy Powell


By Greg Ferrara
Hugo

Hugo

Martin Scorsese has always been a student of the cinema. He cherishes its history, educates on and illuminates it whenever he can, and fights to preserve it as much as any preservation society can boast. It was, thus, natural that Scorsese would want to adapt Brian Selznick's beautifully illustrated and richly detailed novel, The Invention of Hugo Cabret, for the screen when he directed Hugo in 2011. The story of a small boy maintaining the clocks in the Gare Montparnasse railway station in Paris in 1931, finds its way into film history and art, and the importance of preservation, and how a young person's discovery of the past can have a profound influence on the direction of their life. The story of Hugo begins with Hugo Cabret (Asa Butterfield) in the railway station maintaining the clocks. We quickly find out that Hugo's father, played by Jude Law, was a clockmaker himself and excitedly taught Hugo how to fix clocks, automatons, and other mechanical curiosities of the day. When Hugo's father died, he was put into the care of his Uncle Claude (Ray Winstone), the actual person tasked with the clock maintenance in the station. When Claude disappears, Hugo maintains the clocks in secret, fearing if the authorities find out his uncle is gone, he will be sent away as an orphan. How all of this relates to the archives of Georges Méliès is a part of the joy in watching the movie and following the story. Scorsese films the montage of Méliès' flickering cinematic miracles with all the love of an archivist and teacher whose dual purpose is to enlighten and inspire. The cast of Hugo included two child actors, Butterfield and Chloë Grace Moretz, already old hands at showbiz by their early teens. Butterfield had made four movies prior and Moretz had achieved fame in the controversial role of Hit Girl in Kick-Ass (2010). But with Hugo they moved into a new dimension, playing two lost souls who bond over the discovery of a rich, hidden past. And while the film has an array of talented stars filling its cast, from Ben Kingsley and Jude Law to Christopher Lee and Sacha Baron Cohen, it is Butterfield and Moretz that hold the story together and carry the movie effortlessly on their shoulders. Once released, the movie did not have immediate success. The critics loved it, and when awards season rolled around, it was greeted with multiple accolades, including eleven Academy Award nominations. But the box office just wasn't there. Oh, it wasn't bad, totaling almost 200 million worldwide, but with a production and marketing budget that combined for close to 300 million, that wasn't nearly enough to save it from being labeled a flop. Interestingly, a part of the financial problems came with the filming techniques used, specifically 3-D. It was Scorsese's first foray into the trendy process which ended up slowing down production while at the same time inflating ticket prices that kept audiences away. Despite 3-D being touted as a mainstay, every 30 years or so when it comes back around, it never seems worth it. And it never seems to become a mainstay. By the end of the second decade of the 21st century, it was already, once again, left for dead. But Hugo is not. Despite its box office failure, it's a movie with tremendous staying power and one of the best of Scorsese's recent films career. Scorsese has always loved the cinema and this movie is, in no small part, a love letter to the movies that have defined his life. Directed by Martin Scorsese Written by John Logan Produced by David Crockett, Barbara De Fina, Christi Dembrowski, Johnny Depp , Tim Headington, Georgia Kacandes Cast: Ben Kingsley (Georges Méliès), Sacha Baron Cohen (Station Inspector), Asa Butterfield (Hugo Cabret), Chloë Grace Moretz (Isabelle), Ray Winstone (Uncle Claude), Emily Mortimer (Lisette), Christopher Lee (Monsieur Labisse), Helen McCrory (Mama Jeanne), Michael Stuhlbarg (Rene Tabard), Frances de la Tour (Madame Emilie), Richard Griffiths (Monsieur Frick), Jude Law (Hugo's Father) Music by Howard Shore Cinematography by Robert Richardson Film Editing by Thelma Schoonmaker Casting by Ellen Lewis Production Design by Dante Ferretti Art Direction by Martin Foley, Christian Huband, Rod McLean, Stuart Rose, Luca Tranchino, David Warren Set Decoration by Francesca Lo Schiavo Costume Design by Sandy Powell By Greg Ferrara

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Wide Release in United States Fall November 23, 2011

Released in United States on Video February 28, 2012

Based on the novel "The Invention of Hugo Cabret" by Brian Selznick and published by Scholastic Press on January 30, 2007.

Chris Wedge was previously attached to direct.

The production spent nine days in Paris, shooting in the Latin Quarter at the Sorbonne and in the area around the Square de l'Opera-Louis Jouvet.

Released in United States on Video February 28, 2012

Wide Release in United States Fall November 23, 2011