Let's Live a Little


1h 25m 1948

Brief Synopsis

A harried, overworked advertising executive is being pursued romantically by one of his clients, a successful perfume magnate ... and his former fiancée. The latest client of the agency is a psychiatrist and author of a new book. When the executive goes over to discuss the ad campaign, the psychiatrist turns out to be a woman. But what does he really need? Romance? Or analysis?

Film Details

Release Date
Nov 1948
Premiere Information
New York opening: 9 Dec 1948
Production Company
United California Productions, Inc.
Distribution Company
Eagle-Lion Films, Inc.
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 25m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
7,650ft (10 reels)

Synopsis

Duke Crawford, an agent for Montgomery Advertising in New York City, is currently handling the account of difficult cosmetics manufacturer Michele Bennett, to whom he was formerly engaged. Michele continually exasperates Duke by refusing to sign a contract until he reciprocates her affection. Tired of dealing with women clients, Duke threatens to quit the Michele Bennett account, prompting his boss, James Montgomery, to give him the job of book promotion for a nerve psychologist named J. O. Loring. On his way to Loring's office, Duke gives himself an electric shave in a taxicab--a promotional idea he invented--and arrives with half a mustache, giving the impression he is a mentally disturbed patient. Duke is surprised to learn that J. O. Loring is an attractive woman named Jo, and immediately determines to prove that he is anesthetized from women by kissing the doctor. Jo prescribes her novel on stress relief, called Let's Live a Little , but that night, all of Duke's attempts to fall asleep fail. The next day, Duke makes an appointment with Jo as her patient, and she advises him that if he wants Michele to sign the contract, he must meet her womanly needs for "champagne, a waltz and a caress." Duke makes arrangements for a perfect night out with Michele, and Jo arrives at the nightclub with her stuffy surgeon boyfriend, Dr. Richard Fields, to observe her patient. Michele quickly realizes that Jo and Duke are falling in love, and when she is served a cake with an advertising contract inside instead of a marriage license, she throws his drink at him and walks out, sending Duke into a malaise in which he keeps repeating ad slogans. Accompanied by Field, Jo takes Duke to a lakeside lodge for a rest cure, and during a moonlit canoe ride, Duke kisses her, proving that he is cured of his hatred of women. Back in New York, Duke is rejuvenated by his love for Jo, and launches a successful radio campaign for her book. During an interview on the air, Jo explains how a recent patient of hers got over a nervous breakdown caused by a romantic breakup by falling in love with his nurse, who did not love him back, but merely aided him in a transference of his affections. Furious to find himself depicted as a guinea pig in a love experiment, Duke resolves to forget Jo and assert himself with Michele. Soon, Jo reads about Duke's engagement to Michele in the newspaper and begins to have a mental breakdown of her own in which she can think of nothing but Duke. A few days before Michele and Duke's wedding, Field takes Jo to the lodge to cure her of her obsession with Duke. There he proposes to her, but she can see only Duke's face, and rejects him. In the middle of Michele's tasteless redecorating of Duke's apartment, he gets a telephone call from Field, who chastises him for exploiting Jo in his ad campaign and defiantly announces that Jo is now in his care. Duke reacts by walking out on Michele and coming to Jo's rescue at the lodge. Michele follows, and as Field practices his punch, Duke embraces Jo and convinces her that his kisses are real.

Film Details

Release Date
Nov 1948
Premiere Information
New York opening: 9 Dec 1948
Production Company
United California Productions, Inc.
Distribution Company
Eagle-Lion Films, Inc.
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 25m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
7,650ft (10 reels)

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

This film was the first picture made by Robert Cummings' and Eugene Frenke's company, United California Productions. According to an article in Parade, the film cost $1,100,000 to produce. A radio version was broadcast on Screen Directors' Playhouse on January 16, 1949 and starred Robert Cummings and Betty Lou Gerson.