Leave It to Blondie


1h 14m 1945

Brief Synopsis

Dagwood and Blondie have each written checks for charity unaware the other has done so. To cover the amounts they enter a song-writing contest. Meanwhile Mr. Dithers wants Dagwood to soften up a female client in order to close a real estate deal.

Film Details

Release Date
Feb 22, 1945
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Columbia Pictures Corp.
Distribution Company
Columbia Pictures Corp.
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the comic strip "Blondie" created by Chic Young, owned and copyrighted by King Features Syndicate, Inc. (1930--).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 14m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
6,501ft (7 reels)

Synopsis

Though living on a tight budget, Blondie Bumstead and her worrying husband Dagwood manage to scrape together enough money to make a one hundred dollar contribution to the Underprivileged Children's Camp Fund. A terrible blunder is made, however, when Blondie and Dagwood each contribute one hundred dollars to the fund without realizing that the other has written a check. The couple knows that unless more money is deposited in their bank account, one of the checks will bounce. While Dagwood fears that his bounced check will likely bring on the violent wrath of Elmer Fuddle, the man to whom he gave his check, Blondie fears that her bounced check would certainly result in her ostracism from Emily Harding's social circle. An apparent solution to the Bumsteads' financial woes comes when Dagwood and Blondie's son Alexander finds a song manuscript written by Dagwood's uncle Horace and enters it in Laura Meredith's song contest. One day, Dagwood's co-workers take him to a tea room to see a fortune-teller. Blondie, who is also at the tea room, overhears the fortune-teller telling Dagwood that a black-eyed brunette will be entering his life, and she becomes suspicious. Blondie realizes that her husband loves her, though, when she discovers that the title of the song entered in the contest in Dagwood's name, "That Blue-Eyed Sweetheart of Mine," must refer to her. Meanwhile, Dagwood's boss, J. C. Dithers, decides to sell Mrs. Meredith some worthless real estate for her children's camp, and uses Dagwood and his song entry as an excuse to meet her. Soon after Dagwood learns that his song has been selected as one of the top three contenders for first prize in the song competition, and that he must sing his song to qualify for the money, he begins taking singing lessons from a woman who happens to be a black-eyed brunette. When Blondie catches sight of the pretty singing coach, she runs away in tears and locks her husband out of the house. Later, Dagwood tries in vain to get back into his house and is forced to spend the night in a hotel. The next morning, the day of the competition, Dagwood wakes up with a terrible cold and loses his voice. Instead of singing his song himself, Dagwood tries to fake it by mouthing the words to a pre-recorded version of the song. Dagwood's luck worsens when the needle on the record skips and his ruse is exposed. Chaos ensues when Mrs. Meredith discovers the ploy, but Dagwood saves himself with a complete confession. Impressed by Dagwood's honesty, Mrs. Meredith decides to buy Mr. Dithers' property and award Dagwood with a five hundred dollar bonus.

Film Details

Release Date
Feb 22, 1945
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Columbia Pictures Corp.
Distribution Company
Columbia Pictures Corp.
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the comic strip "Blondie" created by Chic Young, owned and copyrighted by King Features Syndicate, Inc. (1930--).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 14m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
6,501ft (7 reels)

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

Leave It to Blondie marked Abby Berlin's first film as a director. Prior to this film, Berlin worked as an assistant director. While Hollywood Reporter production charts list Mary Newton in the cast, her appearance in the released film has not been confirmed. For additional information on the series, please consult the Series Index and see the entry Blondie! in AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1931-40; F3.0391.