Our Modern Maidens


1h 15m 1929
Our Modern Maidens

Brief Synopsis

In this silent film, a flapper offers herself to a diplomat to advance her fiance's career.

Film Details

Genre
Drama
Silent
Sequel
Classic Hollywood
Release Date
Aug 24, 1929
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Pictures
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 15m
Sound
Mono (Western Electric Sound System) (musical score and sound effects), Silent
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.33 : 1
Film Length
6,976ft (8 reels)

Synopsis

Billie Brown and Gil Jordan are two jazz age youngsters who get married. After Billie persuades a reluctant friend, Glenn Abbott, to get Gil a diplomatic post in Paris, she and Gil wed in elaborate style. All is well until Billie discovers Gil's affair with a girl named Kentucky. Giving them good wishes, she leaves her husband. Sometime later in France, she and Abbott meet again, are drawn to each other, and end the film hand in hand.

Film Details

Genre
Drama
Silent
Sequel
Classic Hollywood
Release Date
Aug 24, 1929
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Pictures
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 15m
Sound
Mono (Western Electric Sound System) (musical score and sound effects), Silent
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.33 : 1
Film Length
6,976ft (8 reels)

Articles

Our Modern Maidens


In MGM's Our Modern Maidens (1929), Joan Crawford becomes the bride of Douglas Fairbanks Jr., just as she would in real life in the same year the movie was released. In the movie each falls in love with someone else: Crawford with diplomat Rod La Rocque and Fairbanks with Crawford's houseguest Anita Page. Although he doesn't know it until he's about to embark on his honeymoon with Crawford, Fairbanks has impregnated Page -- a development that was allowed in the days before the Motion Picture Production Code cracked down on "immoral behavior" in movies.

Already engaged as Our Modern Maidens was being shot, Crawford and Fairbanks had adjacent dressing rooms and had a special whistle to announce their presence to each other. They also took to speaking a special form of "pig Latin" that no one else could understand. After the movie was completed, the pair placed their footprints in cement at Grauman's Chinese Theater. Then they were off to their wedding in New York City on June 3, 1929. (The marriage ended in divorce in 1933.)

Our Modern Maidens, Crawford's final silent film, was a follow-up to her star-making vehicle, Our Dancing Daughters (1928), which also co-starred Page. A third entry in Crawford's "Jazz Baby" series, Our Blushing Brides (1930), led one wag of the day to wonder whether a fourth film might be called Our Dizzy Divorcees. The successful series propelled Crawford into superstardom with her projection of what one reviewer of Our Modern Maidens described as "the hard, ultra-modern, world-weary girl so prevalent in our contemporary life."

Producer: Jack Conway, Hunt Stromberg (uncredited)
Director: Jack Conway
Screenplay: Marian Ainslee, Ruth Cummings, Josephine Lovett
Cinematography: Oliver Marsh
Art Direction: Cedric Gibbons
Original Music: Arthur Lange, William Axt (uncredited)
Editing: Sam Zimbalist
Costume Design: Adrian
Principal Cast: Joan Crawford (Billie Brown), Rod La Rocque (Glenn Abbott), Douglas Fairbanks Jr. (Gil Jordan), Anita Page (Kentucky Strafford), Josephine Dunn (Ginger ) Edward Nugent (Reg).
BW-76m.

by Roger Fristoe
Our Modern Maidens

Our Modern Maidens

In MGM's Our Modern Maidens (1929), Joan Crawford becomes the bride of Douglas Fairbanks Jr., just as she would in real life in the same year the movie was released. In the movie each falls in love with someone else: Crawford with diplomat Rod La Rocque and Fairbanks with Crawford's houseguest Anita Page. Although he doesn't know it until he's about to embark on his honeymoon with Crawford, Fairbanks has impregnated Page -- a development that was allowed in the days before the Motion Picture Production Code cracked down on "immoral behavior" in movies. Already engaged as Our Modern Maidens was being shot, Crawford and Fairbanks had adjacent dressing rooms and had a special whistle to announce their presence to each other. They also took to speaking a special form of "pig Latin" that no one else could understand. After the movie was completed, the pair placed their footprints in cement at Grauman's Chinese Theater. Then they were off to their wedding in New York City on June 3, 1929. (The marriage ended in divorce in 1933.) Our Modern Maidens, Crawford's final silent film, was a follow-up to her star-making vehicle, Our Dancing Daughters (1928), which also co-starred Page. A third entry in Crawford's "Jazz Baby" series, Our Blushing Brides (1930), led one wag of the day to wonder whether a fourth film might be called Our Dizzy Divorcees. The successful series propelled Crawford into superstardom with her projection of what one reviewer of Our Modern Maidens described as "the hard, ultra-modern, world-weary girl so prevalent in our contemporary life." Producer: Jack Conway, Hunt Stromberg (uncredited) Director: Jack Conway Screenplay: Marian Ainslee, Ruth Cummings, Josephine Lovett Cinematography: Oliver Marsh Art Direction: Cedric Gibbons Original Music: Arthur Lange, William Axt (uncredited) Editing: Sam Zimbalist Costume Design: Adrian Principal Cast: Joan Crawford (Billie Brown), Rod La Rocque (Glenn Abbott), Douglas Fairbanks Jr. (Gil Jordan), Anita Page (Kentucky Strafford), Josephine Dunn (Ginger ) Edward Nugent (Reg). BW-76m. by Roger Fristoe

Quotes

Trivia

Joan Crawford married her co-star Douglas Fairbanks Jr. in a well orchestrated publicity event for the film.

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States 1929

Sequel to "Our Dancing Daughters" (1929) directed by Harry Beaumont.

Released in United States 1929