The Last Rebel


1h 30m 1971

Brief Synopsis

A pair of confederate soldiers rescue a black man from a lynching.

Film Details

MPAA Rating
PG
Genre
Western
Release Date
Jan 1971
Premiere Information
World premiere in Birmingham, AL: 9 Aug 1971
Production Company
Glendinning Films; Spangler Pictures, Ltd.; U.S. Capital Corporation
Distribution Company
Columbia Pictures
Country
Italy and United States
Location
Spain; Rome, Italy

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 30m
Sound
Mono
Color
Color (Technicolor)
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.85 : 1

Synopsis

In Missouri in the spring of 1865, Confederate and Union army camps are at a standoff when the Confederates hear that Gen. Lee has surrendered in Virginia. When ordered to lay down their arms, two of the soldiers, Burnside Hollis and Matt Graves, flee to avoid prison camp. Nearby, they steal two Union horses, then race to the nearest town, where they forcibly "trade" the horses for two better ones. Coming across a wagon train of a family of settlers waiting for a runaway slave, Duncan, to be returned by a lynch mob, Hollis takes Duncan at gunpoint and the three escape together. That night, they set up camp, where Graves, annoyed that they now must include a black man, outlines a plan to allow them to stop running. To that end, the next day they hijack a wagon, aided substantially by Duncan, kill the driver and one passenger and commandeer the horses. Inside is Camelia Dupres, who is instantly attracted to Hollis, whom she mistakenly calls "Captain." At the next town, they drop off Camelia and leave the dead bodies with the sheriff. Although they hope for a reward, the sheriff pulls out his gun and warns them to leave town within the hour. Instead, they visit Pearl's saloon, mistaking it for a restaurant, and meet the madam, Ruby, and Pearl, her star attraction. Hollis receives a letter from Camelia, containing money, then practices at the pool table, where his prowess impresses Pearl and gives Graves ideas. That night, as Hollis approaches an arrogant cowboy, Jake, who is dominating the pool table, Graves instructs Duncan to back up Hollis, to which Duncan replies, "if anything happens to Capt. Hollis, I'll shoot you first." Hollis loses the first game but then, betting money Pearl has loaned him, easily wins the second. Graves, pretending not to know Hollis, backs him with more money, and after Hollis wins again, he secretly hands the bulk of his earnings to Duncan. Soon after, Duncan approaches a wagon outside in which a small black boy sits with a loaded shotgun, while the sheriff enters the saloon. From inside, they hear a shot outside, causing the sheriff to run out to investigate. Jake then insists on betting another thousand dollars, but this time when Hollis insists on seeing the money, Jake draws his gun. Quickly disarming him, Hollis takes gun, instructs Jake's pals to drop their arms, and throws them out of the saloon. Meanwhile, Duncan has taken the boy and his gun and ridden off. Hollis goes upstairs to Pearl's room, where he returns part of her stake and assures her that he will return with the rest of the money. As they make love, she confesses that she loves him and sees him as her way out of prostitution. Graves soon interrupts them, insisting on his share of the winnings, and when Hollis informs him casually that Duncan has the cash, Graves, in a murderous rage, goes in search of Duncan. Later, the sheriff incites Jake to kill Hollis and hands the cowboy a gun. As Jake enters the saloon, Ruby rushes to warn Hollis, but before she can, Jake breaks into Pearl's room. Unconcerned, Hollis tells Jake he lost the money, then shoots a gun he has hidden under the sheets, killing Jake. Hollis then flees town, followed by the sheriff's posse. As Duncan and the boy travel on calmly, Hollis visits Camelia and her mother, Mme. Dupres, who welcome him warmly. After accepting their clothes and food, Hollis retires to his room, where first Camelia and, later, her mother, pay a personal visit. Meanwhile, Graves continues searching for Duncan, offering a reward to the men he happens upon, soon gathering a group of four loyal men. One day, Duncan shows up at the Dupres house, where Hollis demands his money. Outside, the boy hides as a group of men in hooded robes appear. The men take aim at Hollis and Duncan, then search for the money, but cannot locate it. Hollis recognizes the leader as Graves, who commands the two men to dig a grave outside, then throws down two knives and instructs them to fight to the death. With no choice, they begin fighting, but are interrupted when the boy picks up one of the strangers' guns and shoots it. Hollis and Duncan use the distraction to kill as many of the intruders as they can, after which the others, including Graves, run away. Duncan then shows Hollis that the money is hidden in his rifle butt. Hollis gives Duncan half the money, and though Duncan wants them to remain together, Hollis insists on returning to town to repay his debt to Pearl. Although Duncan calls Hollis "a damn fool," he takes the boy and joins him, intent on repaying his debt to him. Soon after, Hollis strides into Pearl's room, where he forcibly ejects her customer. At the same time, Graves, who has followed him, informs the sheriff of Hollis' whereabouts and promises to back up the posse in apprehending him. At Pearl's, Ruby sees a large group of men heading her way and, after sending her girls out the back, goes downstairs to talk to the sheriff. When a nervous deputy shoots at Ruby, Hollis leaps onto the landing, firing back. The sheriff takes cover and asks for Duncan in exchange for Hollis' life, in response to which Hollis shoots the deputy in the arm. Meanwhile, outside, Graves and his men surround the saloon. After Duncan kills the sheriff, he sends the boy to hide, while Hollis calls out to Graves that the sheriff is dead. Although Graves swears he wants only the money, when Pearl looks out of her upstairs window, Graves instructs his men to shoot her. Hollis sends the deputy outside to test Graves's intentions, and Graves, assuming the person coming out is Hollis or Duncan, shoots the deputy. Hollis and Duncan then retreat upstairs and begin a shootout with Graves's men. Seeing that Pearl is dead, Hollis instructs Ruby to fix her hair, then returns to the window. With six of Graves's men remaining, Hollis tells Duncan to wait until dark, when they can flee. However, Graves's men build a bomb to smoke them out, forcing Hollis and Duncan to jump through the front window. Shooting into the street, they soon kill five of the men, leaving only Graves alive. Hollis calls him out, but before he can kill him, Ruby appears and shoots Graves dead. The boy emerges from his hiding place and runs into Duncan's arms, and as Pearl's collapses in flames, Hollis walks off alone.

Film Details

MPAA Rating
PG
Genre
Western
Release Date
Jan 1971
Premiere Information
World premiere in Birmingham, AL: 9 Aug 1971
Production Company
Glendinning Films; Spangler Pictures, Ltd.; U.S. Capital Corporation
Distribution Company
Columbia Pictures
Country
Italy and United States
Location
Spain; Rome, Italy

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 30m
Sound
Mono
Color
Color (Technicolor)
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.85 : 1

Articles

The Last Rebel


Back in the late '60s and early '70s, an era when 24/7 cable networks and an "Internet" of computers weren't much further along than concepts, it'd be tough to identify a public figure more ubiquitous than New York Jets quarterback Joe Namath. The University of Alabama standout--whose Hall of Fame career would always be defined by his brash guarantee of a victory against the heavily favored Kansas City Chiefs in Super Bowl III-- seemed never to be long out of the media in those days, as much for his string of endorsements and notorious bachelor lifestyle as for his play in the pros.

At the height of Broadway Joe's vogue, a handful of movie producers were more than willing to roll the dice on whether his easy charisma would effectively translate to the screen. The biker flick C.C. and Company (1970), which paired him with Ann-Margret at the end of her exploitation phase, and Norwood (1970), a country music-laced comedy-drama vehicle for Glen Campbell, pretty much left critics and audiences with the consensus that Joe shouldn't quit his day job. Namath, at fourth and long with his film career, then went for it with a spaghetti western, The Last Rebel (1971).

Helmed by first -and last time - director Denys McCoy, the scenario is set in Missouri just after Lee's surrender at Appomattox, where Confederate soldiers Burnside Hollis (Namath) and Matt Graves (Jack Elam) decide that the lives of fugitives would be preferable to a Union POW camp. Their flight westward leads them into assorted escapades, including the rescue of Duncan (Woody Strode) from a lynching party. Their subsequent rescue of a runaway stage (which they had intended to rob) and its pretty young passenger (Marina Coffa) brings a cash reward from her grateful, attractive aunt (Annamaria Chio). The trio heads to the local brothel, where Hollis takes a shine to the youthful madam (Victoria George) and concocts a use for their cash stake.

It turns out that Hollis is a fair pool shot, and the group sets up a hustle for some of the bordello's regulars. Hollis entrusts Duncan with a good chunk of the proceeds, and he responds by riding off; the less-than-thrilled Graves wants his cut back, and he's not above recruiting some local Klansmen to help out. Hollis' attempts to square matters without bloodshed are pretty much doomed to failure, leading to a fiery denouement.

Three years earlier, Strode and Elam had been memorably teamed on-screen for the now-classic opening sequence of Sergio Leone's Once Upon a Time in the West (1968), as two of the gunslingers sent (unsuccessfully) to dispatch Charles Bronson; it's conceivable that, given their druthers, they'd have preferred to be killed off five minutes into The Last Rebel. Strode, the groundbreaking UCLA backfield star who became one of the NFL's first African-American players, may never join Namath in Canton, but he definitely holds the edge in terms of screen resumes. Having first appeared in Sundown (1941), Strode's sinewy presence would mark dozens of films and TV shows over a fifty-year-plus span.

Producer: Larry G. Spangler
Director: Denys McCoy
Screenplay: Lorenzo Sabatini (story and screenplay); Rea Redifer (special story material)
Cinematography: Carlo Carlini
Art Direction: Guido Josia
Music: Tony Ashton, Jon Lord
Film Editing: Fritz Müller
Cast: Joe Namath ('Captain' Hollis), Jack Elam (Matt), Woody Strode (Duncan), Ty Hardin (The Sheriff), Victoria George (Pearl), Renato Romano (Deputy Virgil), Marina Coffa (Camelia), Annamaria Chio (Madam Dupres), Mike Forrest (Cowboy), Bruce Eweka (The Black Boy)
C-90m.

by Jay S. Steinberg
The Last Rebel

The Last Rebel

Back in the late '60s and early '70s, an era when 24/7 cable networks and an "Internet" of computers weren't much further along than concepts, it'd be tough to identify a public figure more ubiquitous than New York Jets quarterback Joe Namath. The University of Alabama standout--whose Hall of Fame career would always be defined by his brash guarantee of a victory against the heavily favored Kansas City Chiefs in Super Bowl III-- seemed never to be long out of the media in those days, as much for his string of endorsements and notorious bachelor lifestyle as for his play in the pros. At the height of Broadway Joe's vogue, a handful of movie producers were more than willing to roll the dice on whether his easy charisma would effectively translate to the screen. The biker flick C.C. and Company (1970), which paired him with Ann-Margret at the end of her exploitation phase, and Norwood (1970), a country music-laced comedy-drama vehicle for Glen Campbell, pretty much left critics and audiences with the consensus that Joe shouldn't quit his day job. Namath, at fourth and long with his film career, then went for it with a spaghetti western, The Last Rebel (1971). Helmed by first -and last time - director Denys McCoy, the scenario is set in Missouri just after Lee's surrender at Appomattox, where Confederate soldiers Burnside Hollis (Namath) and Matt Graves (Jack Elam) decide that the lives of fugitives would be preferable to a Union POW camp. Their flight westward leads them into assorted escapades, including the rescue of Duncan (Woody Strode) from a lynching party. Their subsequent rescue of a runaway stage (which they had intended to rob) and its pretty young passenger (Marina Coffa) brings a cash reward from her grateful, attractive aunt (Annamaria Chio). The trio heads to the local brothel, where Hollis takes a shine to the youthful madam (Victoria George) and concocts a use for their cash stake. It turns out that Hollis is a fair pool shot, and the group sets up a hustle for some of the bordello's regulars. Hollis entrusts Duncan with a good chunk of the proceeds, and he responds by riding off; the less-than-thrilled Graves wants his cut back, and he's not above recruiting some local Klansmen to help out. Hollis' attempts to square matters without bloodshed are pretty much doomed to failure, leading to a fiery denouement. Three years earlier, Strode and Elam had been memorably teamed on-screen for the now-classic opening sequence of Sergio Leone's Once Upon a Time in the West (1968), as two of the gunslingers sent (unsuccessfully) to dispatch Charles Bronson; it's conceivable that, given their druthers, they'd have preferred to be killed off five minutes into The Last Rebel. Strode, the groundbreaking UCLA backfield star who became one of the NFL's first African-American players, may never join Namath in Canton, but he definitely holds the edge in terms of screen resumes. Having first appeared in Sundown (1941), Strode's sinewy presence would mark dozens of films and TV shows over a fifty-year-plus span. Producer: Larry G. Spangler Director: Denys McCoy Screenplay: Lorenzo Sabatini (story and screenplay); Rea Redifer (special story material) Cinematography: Carlo Carlini Art Direction: Guido Josia Music: Tony Ashton, Jon Lord Film Editing: Fritz Müller Cast: Joe Namath ('Captain' Hollis), Jack Elam (Matt), Woody Strode (Duncan), Ty Hardin (The Sheriff), Victoria George (Pearl), Renato Romano (Deputy Virgil), Marina Coffa (Camelia), Annamaria Chio (Madam Dupres), Mike Forrest (Cowboy), Bruce Eweka (The Black Boy) C-90m. by Jay S. Steinberg

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

The opening credits, which are presented over drawings of Civil War battles, begin with "Joe Namath as the" followed by "The Last Rebel." The opening and closing credits note that the film's original music was available on Capitol Records. Although Victoria George's credit reads "And introducing," she previously had appeared in the 1967 film El Dorado. Filmfacts stated that producer Larry G. Spangler appears in the film under the pseudonym Larry Laurence; however, this has not been corroborated by any other source.
       Although a June 1, 1970 Hollywood Reporter news item announced that screenwriter Warren Kiefer planned to direct The Last Rebel, Daily Variety reported on June 17, 1970 that he had "bowed out as director at the last minute." The production marked the first for Spangler Pictures, Ltd., owned by Spangler, the producer of the television program The Joe Namath Show. According to the Daily Variety article, Spangler had planned the film as a co-production with Spanish and Italian companies, but changed his mind after learning that quota requirements in the two countries would have necessitated replacing some already cast American actors with Italian and Spanish actors. Instead, he partnered with market research company Glendinning Companies, Inc., forming the corporation Glendinning Films. A May 1970 Hollywood Reporter news item estimated the picture's budget at $1 million.
       The Last Rebel, which marked director Denys McCoy's only feature film, was shot on location in Spain and Italy and at Rome's Cinecittà Studios. In November 1970, as noted in Daily Variety, Spangler was still seeking a distributor for the finished picture. By January 1971, Variety noted that Sid Banks had written a seven-minute cartoon called Super Joe to promote the film and attract a distributor. Eventually, Columbia Pictures bought the distribution rights.
       The Last Rebel marked the first major film role for Namath, the legendary New York Jets quarterback. The role of "Burnside Hollis" mirrored Namath's real-life, well-publicized cockiness and popularity with women. Most reviewers commented negatively on his acting abilities.

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States 1971

Released in United States 1971