Lambada


1h 44m 1990

Brief Synopsis

A shy Beverly Hills teacher moonlights as a Lambada instructor/dancer at night, and leads her students into a cross-town academic competition.

Film Details

Also Known As
Lambada... Le Film
MPAA Rating
Release Date
1990
Distribution Company
WARNER BROS. PICTURES DISTRIBUTION (WBPD)
Location
Los Angeles, California, USA; Miami, Florida, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 44m

Synopsis

A shy Beverly Hills teacher moonlights as a Lambada instructor/dancer at night, and leads her students into a cross-town academic competition.

Crew

Tony Addis

Song

Wenden K Baldwin

Titles

Joel Barkovitz

Sound Editor

R Ray Barnes

Song

Adolfo Bartoli

Director Of Photography

Lee Benton

Stunts

Iain Blodwell

On-Set Dresser

Ken Bornstein

Post-Production Supervisor

Richard Burton

Sound Editor

Kelly Cabral

Production Assistant

Irwin Cadden

Sound Editor

Hank Caldwell

Music

Tina Canny

Sound

Tanya Carmenatti

Song

L J Carusone

Production Assistant

Gregory Cautaen

Song

Mark Christopher

Song

Jack Cloud

Art Director

Tony Coleman

Song

George Colucci

Stunts

Gil Combs

Stunts

Bill Cornford

Production Designer

Midge Costin

Sound Editor

Thierry J Couturier

Sound Editor

Wes Crockett

Song

Charlie Croughwell

Stunt Coordinator

David H Cunningham

Sound

Patrick Cyccone Jr.

Sound

Michelle D'angelo

Production Assistant

Greg De Belles

Song

Greg De Belles

Song Performer

Greg De Belles

Music

Joe Earle

Sound Editor

Peter S Elliot

Foley Editor

Noreen Evans

Sound Editor

Craig Felburg

Sound

Micki Free

Song Performer

Ashley Friedman

Location Manager

Tony Garber

Sound Editor

Albert Gasser

Sound Editor

Andy Gill

Stunts

Paul Girand

Costumes

Francesco Guizetti

Production Assistant

Sanford Hampton

Assistant Director

Cameron Hamza

Sound

Belva Haney

Song

Belva Haney

Song Performer

Eve Honthaner

Production Coordinator

Norman Howell

Stunts

Craig Jaeger

Foley Artist

Dayne Johnson

Makeup

Sidney A Justin Iii

Song

Seth Kaplan

Music Supervisor

Kini Kay

Sound Effects Editor

Maria Kelly

Stunts

Dan Koko

Stunts

Maurizio Lamonica

Camera Operator

Neal Lampert

Adr

Neal Lampert

Foley

Ellen Lang

Casting Associate

Louis Lazzara

Makeup

Blake Lewin

Consultant

Katie Light

Production Coordinator

Stephen Lillis

Production Manager

Dana C Litwack

Wardrobe

Carrie Lucas

Song

Carrie Lucas

Song Performer

Dennis Madalone

Stunts

Marcus Manton

Editor

Marcus Manton

Executive Editor

Godfrey Marks

Adr Editor

Cole Mckay

Stunts

Lesly Michals

Post-Production Supervisor

Ed Mitchell

Casting

C Bat Mite

Song

Leslie Morrow

Location Manager

Dennis Nelson

Song

John Oettinger

Sound Editor

Noon Orsatti

Stunts

Roberto D'ettorre Piazolli

Director Of Photography

Marco Pieroni

Steadicam Operator

Paige Pollack

Foley Artist

Adolfo Quinones

Choreographer

Robert Randles

Music Editor

Larold Rebhun

Sound Editor

Sheldon Renan

Screenplay

Skeeter Bill Robbins

Sound

Beresford Romeo

Song

Jeffrey L Sandler

Sound Editor

Anna Sannito

Production Assistant

Michael J Sarna

Stunts

Dalia Saydah

Makeup

Sharon Schaffer

Stunts

T Gregory Schorer

Sound Editor

Barry Schroeder

Set Decorator

R Michael Schroeder

Production Manager

Kyle Seidenbaum

Titles

Burton Sharp

Casting

Peter Shepherd

Producer

Joel Silberg

Screenplay

Joel Silberg

From Story

Kathy Sledge

Song Performer

Ricky Smith

Song

Janet Ilene Sobel

Costumes

Scott Sproule

Stunts

Brenda K Starr

Song Performer

Duke Stevens

Production Assistant

Warren A. Stevens

Stunt Coordinator

Tony Terry

Song Performer

Robert Thirlwell

Sound

Johnny Thomas

Song

Lisa Thompson

On-Set Dresser

Tim Trella

Stunts

Brian Vessa

Rerecording

Brian Vessa

Foley

R Walt Vincent

Music Supervisor

Judette Warren

Song Performer

Bernard Weiser

Sound Editor

Bill Wolfer

Song Performer

Smith Wordes

Choreographer

Merritt Yohnka

Stunts

Jack Ziga

Assistant Director

Mary Zitano

Costumes

Eddie H Ziv

Assistant Director

Film Details

Also Known As
Lambada... Le Film
MPAA Rating
Release Date
1990
Distribution Company
WARNER BROS. PICTURES DISTRIBUTION (WBPD)
Location
Los Angeles, California, USA; Miami, Florida, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 44m

Articles

Keene Curtis (1923-2002)


Keene Curtis, a veteran Broadway, television and film actor who was familiar to many viewers the snippy upstairs restaurant owner John Allen Hill for the final three seasons of Cheers, died on October 13th of complications of Alzheimer's disease at a retirement center in Bountiful, Utah. He was 79. Born in Salt Lake City in 1923, Curtis grew up in Bountiful, in a family that adored theater. His father built his young son a miniature stage out of an old chiffonier, using a towel for a curtain. Curtis soon began to make his own little theaters out of cardboard boxes and put on shows for the neighborhood kids. No doubt of his calling, Curtis went on to receive his bachelor's and master's degrees in Theater Arts from the University of Utah, where he was a student actor and cheerleader. He had returned to college after spending three years in the Navy, and made his film debut when Orson Welles discovered him for his production of Macbeth (1948) and cast him in the role of Lennox, and launching his career. Despite the promising film debut, Curtis dedicated himself to the stage for the next twenty years, but it was not until he won a Tony Award in 1971 as best featured actor in a musical for The Rothschilds did his profile rise. After his stint as Daddy Warbucks in the Broadway production of Annie Curtis began to venture into television and films, where his baldpate and rich diction enlivened many programs, particularly in comedies where he made a superb comic foil. In addition to his role on Cheers, Curtis’ other television credits include: MASH Ally McBeal, The Drew Carey Show and Caroline in the City. Among Curtis’ most notable films: Heaven Can Wait (1978) The Buddy System (1984), Sliver (1993) and Fred Schepisi’s I.Q. (1994) where Curtis turned in a charming cameo as President Dwight Eisenhower. In 1998, Curtis endowed a scholarship at the University of Utah to help graduates of the school's Actor Training Program launch their careers. He also donated to the university his Tony Award and 48 boxes of theater memorabilia and personal papers, including a 1961 letter from Noel Coward, who praised Curtis' "firmness, patience, efficiency and most of all your ability to handle people with tact and imagination." He is survived by his sister-in-law, nieces and nephews. Michael T. Toole
Keene Curtis (1923-2002)

Keene Curtis (1923-2002)

Keene Curtis, a veteran Broadway, television and film actor who was familiar to many viewers the snippy upstairs restaurant owner John Allen Hill for the final three seasons of Cheers, died on October 13th of complications of Alzheimer's disease at a retirement center in Bountiful, Utah. He was 79. Born in Salt Lake City in 1923, Curtis grew up in Bountiful, in a family that adored theater. His father built his young son a miniature stage out of an old chiffonier, using a towel for a curtain. Curtis soon began to make his own little theaters out of cardboard boxes and put on shows for the neighborhood kids. No doubt of his calling, Curtis went on to receive his bachelor's and master's degrees in Theater Arts from the University of Utah, where he was a student actor and cheerleader. He had returned to college after spending three years in the Navy, and made his film debut when Orson Welles discovered him for his production of Macbeth (1948) and cast him in the role of Lennox, and launching his career. Despite the promising film debut, Curtis dedicated himself to the stage for the next twenty years, but it was not until he won a Tony Award in 1971 as best featured actor in a musical for The Rothschilds did his profile rise. After his stint as Daddy Warbucks in the Broadway production of Annie Curtis began to venture into television and films, where his baldpate and rich diction enlivened many programs, particularly in comedies where he made a superb comic foil. In addition to his role on Cheers, Curtis’ other television credits include: MASH Ally McBeal, The Drew Carey Show and Caroline in the City. Among Curtis’ most notable films: Heaven Can Wait (1978) The Buddy System (1984), Sliver (1993) and Fred Schepisi’s I.Q. (1994) where Curtis turned in a charming cameo as President Dwight Eisenhower. In 1998, Curtis endowed a scholarship at the University of Utah to help graduates of the school's Actor Training Program launch their careers. He also donated to the university his Tony Award and 48 boxes of theater memorabilia and personal papers, including a 1961 letter from Noel Coward, who praised Curtis' "firmness, patience, efficiency and most of all your ability to handle people with tact and imagination." He is survived by his sister-in-law, nieces and nephews. Michael T. Toole

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States on Video April 15, 2003

Released in United States Spring March 16, 1990

Began shooting January 22, 1990.

Completed shooting March 5, 1990.

Released in United States Spring March 16, 1990

Released in United States on Video April 15, 2003