La Cage Aux Folles


1h 37m 1979
La Cage Aux Folles

Brief Synopsis

A gay couple has to straighten out their act when their son gets engaged to a noted conservative's daughter.

Film Details

Also Known As
Birds of a Feather, Får jag presentera: min mamma, herr Albin, cage aux folles
MPAA Rating
Genre
Comedy
Musical
Foreign
Adaptation
Release Date
1979
Production Company
Artistes Associes
Distribution Company
MGM Home Entertainment; United Artists Films

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 37m
Sound
Mono
Color
Color (Eastmancolor)

Synopsis

Chaos ensues when a gay man attempts to pose as straight for the benefit of his son's future in-laws. Renato owns a popular nightclub and his long-time lover Zaza, is a female impersonator and the club's star attraction. Unfortunately, Renato's son, Laurent has not told his future father-in-law, an important figure in a conservative political organization about his unconventional family. But Renato finds his familiar habits, and those of the even more flamboyant Zaza, getting in the way of their charade. Zaza then comes up with what he thinks is an ideal solution: he'll dress in drag and pose as Renato's wife.

Film Details

Also Known As
Birds of a Feather, Får jag presentera: min mamma, herr Albin, cage aux folles
MPAA Rating
Genre
Comedy
Musical
Foreign
Adaptation
Release Date
1979
Production Company
Artistes Associes
Distribution Company
MGM Home Entertainment; United Artists Films

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 37m
Sound
Mono
Color
Color (Eastmancolor)

Award Nominations

Best Costume Design

1978

Best Director

1978
Edouard Molinaro

Best Writing, Screenplay

1980
Edouard Molinaro

Articles

La Cage Aux Folles


The international release of La Cage Aux Folles (1978) marked a significant turning point in cinema for gay audiences because it introduced worldwide audiences to the homosexual subculture in a non-threatening, highly entertaining fashion. The film, based on a play by Jean Poiret, was a wildly successful venture, ultimately earning over forty million, spawning two sequels, a Broadway musical, and a popular American remake - The Birdcage (1996), starring Robin Williams, Nathan Lane, and Gene Hackman. America showed its approval with three Oscar nods for Director, Adapted Screenplay, and Costume Design, as well as a Golden Globe win for Best Foreign Film.

Filmed on location in Saint-Tropez, La Cage Aux Folles (translation: The Mad Cage) is the story of a gay couple that own a nightclub famous for its flamboyant drag queens and cabaret shows. When the son of one of the men gets engaged, the couple must disguise their alternative lifestyle from their stuffy, conservative future in-laws. The film, also titled Birds of a Feather, was helmed by French director Edouard Molinaro, who went on to direct both sequels; neither, however, attained the success of the original. Producer Marcello Danon extended his influence to the film's remake, The Birdcage, now in the role of executive producer.

Veteran Italian actor Ugo Tognazzi and prolific French actor Michel Serrault play the lead roles--Serrault reprised his role from the stage version. His performance earned him the prized Cesar award for Best Actor from his home country. Tognazzi was an acclaimed comic actor with a career that spanned forty years, and included a Best Actor win at Cannes for his dramatic role in the 1981 Bertolucci film La Tragedia di un Uomo Ridicolo (Tragedy of a Ridiculous Man). The film's score was composed by Ennio Morricone, whose collaborations with Spaghetti Western pioneer Sergio Leone established his reputation as one of the top composers in the business. His triumphs include Once Upon a Time in the West (1969), Days of Heaven (1978), and The Mission (1986).

La Cage Aux Folles also inspired a Broadway musical of the same name, marking another first by exposing a mainstream audience to a homosexual musical on the Great White Way. Written by Harvey Fierstein with lyrics and music by Jerry Herman, the musical version of the film also enjoyed great success, with a run of over 1700 performances. Likewise, the American remake, The Birdcage, grossed over 120 million in the U.S. alone, as well as grabbing several award wins and nominations. La Cage Aux Folles itself helped to boost the failing fortunes of United Artists during the late 1970s, and established a high water mark for French films released in the U.S. that was not toppled until over twenty years later with the release of Amelie (2001).

Producer: Marcello Danon
Director: Edouard Molinaro
Screenplay: Marcello Danon, Edouard Molinaro
Art Direction: Mario Garbuglia
Cinematography: Armando Nannuzzi
Editing: Monique Isnardon, Robert Isnardon
Music: Ennio Morricone
Cast: Ugo Tognazzi (Renato) Michel Serrault (Albin/ZaZa), Michel Galabru (Simon Charrier), Claire Maurier (Simone), Remi Laurent (Laurent), Benny Luke (Jacob), Luisa Maneri (Andrea Charrier).
C-97m. Letterboxed.

By Eleanor Quin
La Cage Aux Folles

La Cage Aux Folles

The international release of La Cage Aux Folles (1978) marked a significant turning point in cinema for gay audiences because it introduced worldwide audiences to the homosexual subculture in a non-threatening, highly entertaining fashion. The film, based on a play by Jean Poiret, was a wildly successful venture, ultimately earning over forty million, spawning two sequels, a Broadway musical, and a popular American remake - The Birdcage (1996), starring Robin Williams, Nathan Lane, and Gene Hackman. America showed its approval with three Oscar nods for Director, Adapted Screenplay, and Costume Design, as well as a Golden Globe win for Best Foreign Film. Filmed on location in Saint-Tropez, La Cage Aux Folles (translation: The Mad Cage) is the story of a gay couple that own a nightclub famous for its flamboyant drag queens and cabaret shows. When the son of one of the men gets engaged, the couple must disguise their alternative lifestyle from their stuffy, conservative future in-laws. The film, also titled Birds of a Feather, was helmed by French director Edouard Molinaro, who went on to direct both sequels; neither, however, attained the success of the original. Producer Marcello Danon extended his influence to the film's remake, The Birdcage, now in the role of executive producer. Veteran Italian actor Ugo Tognazzi and prolific French actor Michel Serrault play the lead roles--Serrault reprised his role from the stage version. His performance earned him the prized Cesar award for Best Actor from his home country. Tognazzi was an acclaimed comic actor with a career that spanned forty years, and included a Best Actor win at Cannes for his dramatic role in the 1981 Bertolucci film La Tragedia di un Uomo Ridicolo (Tragedy of a Ridiculous Man). The film's score was composed by Ennio Morricone, whose collaborations with Spaghetti Western pioneer Sergio Leone established his reputation as one of the top composers in the business. His triumphs include Once Upon a Time in the West (1969), Days of Heaven (1978), and The Mission (1986). La Cage Aux Folles also inspired a Broadway musical of the same name, marking another first by exposing a mainstream audience to a homosexual musical on the Great White Way. Written by Harvey Fierstein with lyrics and music by Jerry Herman, the musical version of the film also enjoyed great success, with a run of over 1700 performances. Likewise, the American remake, The Birdcage, grossed over 120 million in the U.S. alone, as well as grabbing several award wins and nominations. La Cage Aux Folles itself helped to boost the failing fortunes of United Artists during the late 1970s, and established a high water mark for French films released in the U.S. that was not toppled until over twenty years later with the release of Amelie (2001). Producer: Marcello Danon Director: Edouard Molinaro Screenplay: Marcello Danon, Edouard Molinaro Art Direction: Mario Garbuglia Cinematography: Armando Nannuzzi Editing: Monique Isnardon, Robert Isnardon Music: Ennio Morricone Cast: Ugo Tognazzi (Renato) Michel Serrault (Albin/ZaZa), Michel Galabru (Simon Charrier), Claire Maurier (Simone), Remi Laurent (Laurent), Benny Luke (Jacob), Luisa Maneri (Andrea Charrier). C-97m. Letterboxed. By Eleanor Quin

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Spring March 30, 1979

Released in United States on Video September 1991

Released in United States 1982

Released in United States 1995

Released in United States Spring March 30, 1979

Released in United States on Video September 1991

Released in United States 1982 (Shown at FILMEX: Los Angeles International Film Exposition ("Marathon of Mirth": Comedy Maratho) March 16 - April 1, 1982.)

Released in United States 1995 (Shown in New York City (Walter Reade) as part of program "C'est Drole... Classic and Contemporary French Comedies" June 30 - August 10, 1995.)

The Country of France