King of Burlesque


1h 23m 1936

Brief Synopsis

Former burlesque producer moves into legitimate theatre and does well until he marries a socialite. After his divorce his former top singer returns from London to help out.

Film Details

Also Known As
Blue Chips, The Day Never Came
Release Date
Jan 3, 1936
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp.
Distribution Company
Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp.
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 23m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
7,963ft (10 reels)

Synopsis

After a successful year of producing burlesque shows on Fourteenth Street in New York, Kerry Bolton wants to move uptown and do big musical revues, as does his singer and choreographer Pat Doran, who loves him. Kerry's partner, Joe Cooney, however, is cynical about the idea and refuses to join them. Four years later, Kerry's nickname has changed from "King of Burlesque" to "Broadway Czar," as he has produced hit after hit. Kerry, Pat, Joe, now Kerry's general manager, and Joe's girl friend Connie, who wants to marry him, go to an auction at the Park Avenue home of the Cleves, who have recently lost all their money. When Rosalind Cleve sees Kerry poking fun at the plight of her family, she refuses to sell a model ship in which he is interested. In response, Kerry, to insult her, buys much of the remaining merchandise at prices far below their worth. However, when he finally meets her and realizes that she is the type of woman he has dreamed of, he tries to make up by offering to pay a good price for the model, but she refuses. Kerry has Joe investigate Rosalind, and he learns that she is a widow of twenty-six and is engaged to an opera student named Stanley Drake. In need of money, Rosalind visits Kerry during a rehearsal and offers to sell the model ship for $1,500. He agrees, but when he reveals that he has learned that its value is only $400, she pridefully tears up his check. When Kerry suggests that he could help Drake get a start at the Metropolitan, she accepts his dinner invitation. At dinner, Kerry tells her that she has everything he wants in a woman--beauty, brains and class--and predicts that she will be his wife one day. After Kerry and Joe surreptitiously arrange for an institute of music to sponsor Drake to study in Italy, Rosalind, because of her desperate financial situation, agrees to marry Kerry on a business basis with a written contract stipulating that Kerry send her sister to a good school and provide Rosalind with $100,000 in securities in case the marriage fails. Hurt by the news, Pat accepts an offer to work in London. After the honeymoon, Kerry cancels the show under preparation and announces that his next show will have class and style. Rosalind convinces him to put Drake, who has returned, in the lead, and the new "modernistic revue," entitled "Rhythm in Color," becomes Kerry's first flop. When Joe calls Kerry a "chump," for putting Rosalind's "boyfriend" in the show, Kerry slaps him. Although Kerry tries to apologize, Joe leaves him. In London, Pat becomes a big hit as a performer. When she learns that Kerry has had three flops in succession and that Rosalind has left him, she returns and formulates a plan with Joe to get Kerry, who is now down-and-out, to start up a new show. Joe pays an out-of-work Russian immigrant named Kolpolpeck to pose as a millionaire backer, but Kerry is unable to come up with an idea until he sees Rosalind and Drake, who is wearing his coat, come out of a car together. Kerry socks Drake, recovers his coat and tells Joe that he now has his idea. With Kolpolpeck secretly fronting for Pat, Kerry purchases an old theater on Fourteenth Street and has most of the seats in the center removed. He then hires Pat to choreograph all the people who wanted a chance to show their talents when he was too busy for them, including his old telephone operator, elevator operator, doorman, office boy and a seemingly washed-up actor. Cynical about the show's prospects, Joe agrees to marry Connie if the show is a hit. The show, which combines burlesque and Broadway, includes a revolving stage and girls swinging on trapezes above an upper-class audience seated in tables below. After Joe deems it a hit, he and Connie embrace, as do Kerry and Pat.

Cast

Warner Baxter

Kerry Bolton

Alice Faye

Pat Doran

Jack Oakie

Joe Cooney

Mona Barrie

Rosalind Cleve

Arline Judge

Connie

Dixie Dunbar

Marie

Gregory Ratoff

Kolpolpeck

Herbert Mundin

English impresario

Fats Waller

Ben

Nick Long Jr.

Anthony Lamb

Kenny Baker

Arthur

Charles Quigley

Stanley Drake

Paxton Sisters

Specialty dancers

[al] Shaw And [sam] Lee

[Lew] Henkle and [Gus] Keefe

Andrew Tombes

Slattery

Shirley Deane

Phyllis Sears

Harry "zoop" Welsh

"Spud" La Rue

Claudia Coleman

Belle Weaver

Ellen E. Lowe

Miss Meredith

Herbert Ashley

Jake

Jerry Mandy

Frankie

Keye Luke

Wong

Gareth Joplin

The bootblack

Torben Meyer

Leopold, the valet

Sally Adair

Dancer

Eddie Allen

Dancer

Mary Arden

Dancer

Ward Arnold

Dancer

Florine Bale

Dancer

Jim Blair

Dancer

Ethel Bryant

Dancer

Bud Carpenter

Dancer

Peggy Carroll

Dancer

Pokey Champion

Dancer

Georgia Clarke

Dancer

Jack Crosby

Dancer

Pat Dahlin

Dancer

Bobby Dale

Dancer

Bryn Davis

Dancer

Margaret Davis

Dancer

Dixie Dean

Dancer

Marie Deauville

Dancer

Chuck Deshon

Dancer

Pauline Easterday

Dancer

Frank Edmunds

Dancer

Clarette Ellis

Dancer

Frank Erickson

Dancer

Jill Evans

Dancer

Eddie Foy

Dancer

Ken Gatewood

Dancer

Jack Geiger

Dancer

Beverly Haines

Dancer

Gus Hyland

Dancer

Maxine Jerome

Dancer

Harriett King

Dancer

Louise Larabee

Dancer

Elsie Larson

Dancer

Perk Lazelle

Dancer

Patsy Lee

Dancer

Lucile Lehman

Dancer

Margie Mckay

Dancer

Allen Mathews

Dancer

Fred Mayon

Dancer

Gordon Merrick

Dancer

Lucille Miller

Dancer

Inez Mortensen

Dancer

Jack Morton

Dancer

Jim Notaro

"Spud" La Rue

Emmett O'brien

"Spud" La Rue

Maureen O'brien

Dancer

Lorraine Page

Dancer

Dorothy Panter

Dancer

Hal Rand

Dancer

Barbara Reilly

Dancer

Marjean Roach

Dancer

Dorothy Sander

Dancer

Ray Santos

Dancer

Muriel Scheck

Dancer

Marjorie Seavey

Dancer

Rudy Shaves

Dancer

Julie Sheldon

Dancer

Paul Siegel

Dancer

Ann Lavel Smith

Dancer

Ed Stanbridge

Dancer

Juana Sutton

Dancer

June Terry

Dancer

Valerie Traxler

Dancer

Ardelle Unger

Dancer

Buddy Van Fleet

Dancer

Mimi Wagner

Dancer

Gertrude Webber

Dancer

Chiquita Wilcox

Dancer

Ercell Woods

Dancer

Aloha Wray

Dancer

Jane Wyman

Dancer

Film Details

Also Known As
Blue Chips, The Day Never Came
Release Date
Jan 3, 1936
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp.
Distribution Company
Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp.
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 23m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
7,963ft (10 reels)

Award Nominations

Best Dance Direction

1936

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

Vina Delmar's unpublished, uncopyrighted story was entitled "The Day Never Came," which was one of the film's working titles; the other working title was Blue Chips. According to various news items, the film was under preparation by Fox Film Corp. in 1934 as a Erich Pommer production. According to information in the Twentieth Century-Fox Produced Scripts Collection at the UCLA Theater Arts Library, an early draft of the screenplay was entitled "Mr. Manhattan." According to an Hollywood Reporter news item, Irving Cummings was originally scheduled to direct, but by the time shooting was to begin, he had not sufficiently recovered from a recent operation. In November 1935, Darryl Zanuck wrote a memo to the Screen Achievements Bulletin complaining that they had included too many contributing writers in their listings, in view of the regulation that a writer had to contribute at least 10% of the film to be listed as a contributor. In subsequent Screen Achievements Bulletin listing, only William Hurlbut was listed as a contributor, in addition to the writers who received screen billing. According to a Hollywood Reporter news item, Victor Baravalle, the head of M-G-M's music department, was loaned to Fox to be the musical director of this film. Earle Hodgins and Earl Clyde are listed as cast members in a Hollywood Reporter production chart, but their participation in the final film has not been confirmed. In 1943, Twentieth Century-Fox produced a remake entitled Hello, Frisco, Hello that did not credit Delmar with the story. That film was directed by Bruce Humberstone and starred Faye, Oakie and John Payne.

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States 1935

Released in United States March 1977

Released in United States 1935

Released in United States March 1977 (Shown at FILMEX: Los Angeles International Film Exposition (The Mighty Musical Movie Marathon) March 9-27, 1977.)