Just for You


1h 44m 1952

Brief Synopsis

Jordan Blake (a widower) is a successful Broadway Producer who has always been to busy for his children, Barbara and Jerry. Girlfriend, Carolina a musical comedy star, urges Jordan to take his kids on a vacation and get to know them before they are all grown up. Is Jordan already too late?

Film Details

Also Known As
Famous
Release Date
Sep 1952
Premiere Information
Los Angeles opening: 17 Sep 1952
Production Company
Paramount Pictures Corp.
Distribution Company
Paramount Pictures Corp.
Country
United States
Location
Lake Arrowhead, California, United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the short story "Famous" by Stephen Vincent Benét in Good Housekeeping (Aug 1942).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 44m
Sound
Mono
Color
Color (Technicolor)
Film Length
12 reels

Synopsis

On the eve of the opening of his latest Broadway show, producer-songwriter Jordan Blake is so busy making last minute changes that he does not have time to talk with his teenage son Jerry. Jerry and his schoolmate, David McKenzie, wait patiently to see Jordan, even when he is at home rehearsing a new number with his star, Carolina Hill. At the end of the private session, Jordan, a longtime widower, admits his love to Carolina, and she responds with a kiss. After all but promising Carolina a marriage proposal after the opening, Jordan says goodnight but is intercepted by Jerry and David. Excited, Jerry and David tell Jordan about the musical revue they put on at Spaulding, their preparatory school, and ask to audition one of the songs. Jordan listens politely to Jerry's composition, but when Jerry asks for $240 to have a fly-by-night company publish it, Jordan tells him that the song is trite and hackneyed. Jerry, who is secretly in love with Carolina, is crushed by his father's words and bristles when Jordan states that Jerry is not old enough to know loneliness. Although Jordan assures his son that he will become a better songwriter once he has experienced life, Jerry is despondent and fails to show up for opening night. Concerned, Jordan leaves the theater during the performance and drives to Spaulding. There, Jerry accuses Jordan of neglecting him as a child, a charge Jordan does not deny. Before Jordan can discuss the situation any further, however, he gets a call from his chauffeur, informing him that Jordan's teenage daughter Barbara has been arrested. Jordan and Jerry race back to New York, where, in night court, Barbara explains that her governess, the alcoholic Mrs. Angevine, got her involved in a fight with a policeman. After Jordan dismisses Mrs. Angevine, Barbara laments her departure, as she had hoped that the matron could help her get into St. Hilary's, an exclusive finishing school. Upset by the evening's events, Jordan tells Carolina during an opening night party that the "question" he was going to ask her will have to wait until he sorts matters out with his children. To accomplish that, Jordan takes both children to a mountain resort, intending to spend time alone with them. Fearful that Jerry has been spying on some girls, Jordan has a heart-to-heart talk with him, but Jerry, who is unaware of Carolina's relationship with his father, assures him that he has a girl friend in the city. Barbara then informs her father that the St. Hilary's summer camp is across the lake, and Jordan, who has just met Allida de Bronkhart, an older woman who works at the camp, offers to help get an introduction to the headmistress. Barbara declines the offer, however, as she fears that the exclusive school will frown on an entertainer. To Jordan's relief, Carolina flies in for a visit and agrees to have a talk with Jerry. During a boat ride with Jerry, Carolina brings up the subject of marriage, and Jerry, assuming that she is referring to them, gives his enthusiastic approval. Believing that Jerry has endorsed her marriage to his father, Carolina reassures Jordan and returns to New York. Later, Jordan drops by the girls's camp and, not realizing that she is the headmistress, asks Allida for tips on how to get accepted to St. Hilary's. In response, Allida invites him and Barbara to an upcoming summer tea. Later, in New York, Jerry asks Carolina out to dinner, and Carolina happily takes him to a diner. Still oblivious to his feelings, Carolina is startled when a very earnest Jerry brings up their "May-December romance." Carolina leaves suddenly, and after she refuses to see him at the theater, Jerry goes home and starts to write a melancholy song. In the mountains, meanwhile, Jordan and Barbara attend the St. Hilary's tea, where Jordan performs one of his old vaudeville tunes, to the bemusement of the trustees. Sure that her chances of acceptance have been ruined, Barbara runs from the party in tears. Chagrined, Jordan apologizes to Barbara and Allida, who reveals that she is St. Hilary's headmistress and assures him that Barbara has been admitted to the school. Back in New York, Carolina finally tells Jerry that she is in love with another man, but declines to say who. Carolina then meets Jordan at the train station and, after accepting his proposal, which is overheard by a reporter, informs him about Jerry's romantic plight. Jordan tries to comfort his heartbroken son and offers to publish his new song, which is genuinely good. Jerry rejects Jordan's overtures, however, and is devastated when Barbara calls, having heard the news of their father's engagement on the radio. Jerry runs away and enlists in the Air Force. Months later, Jordan, in an attempt to reconcile with his son, begins a U.S.O. tour and winds up at Jerry's base in Alaska. Unaware that Jerry is in the audience, Jordan delivers a moving speech about the wonders of parenthood, then is delighted when both Jerry and Carolina appear at his side.

Cast

Bing Crosby

Jordan Blake

Jane Wyman

Carolina Hill

Ethel Barrymore

Allida de Bronkhart

Bob Arthur

Jerry Blake

Natalie Wood

Barbara Blake

Cora Witherspoon

Mrs. Angevine

Ben Lessy

Georgie Polansky

Regis Toomey

Hodges

Art Smith

Leo

Leon Tyler

David McKenzie

Willis Bouchey

Hank Ross

Herb Vigran

George

Daniel Nagrin

Florence Lessing

Miriam Pandor

Nancy Hale

Guest

Ralph Montgomery

Terence

Robert Rockwell

John Ransome

Douglas Evans

Raymond

Tony Kent

The proctor

Karen Kester

Jane Anderson

Franklyn Farnum

Cook

Brick Sullivan

Policeman

Buck Harrington

Police sergeant

Dave Willock

Counterman

Joel Marston

Harvey

Ed Lucitt

Acrobat

Vern Hollingsworth

Acrobat

Charles O. Simms

Acrobat

Irwin R. Title

Acrobat

Karl R. Reinecker

Acrobat

Glenn P. Mccormick

Acrobat

John Beckner

Acrobat

Mark Linnes

Acrobat

Herbert Lytton

Dr. McKenzie

Dick Keene

Stage manager

Max Keith

Stage manager

Susan Kester

Hilary girl

June Hedin

Hilary girl

Sandra Lee Richards

Hilary girl

Doreen Mccann

Hilary girl

Dickie June Williams

Hilary girl

Stuart Holmes

Trustee

Roy Gordon

Trustee

Harold Miller

Col. Jamison

Bess Flowers

Mrs. Lord

Edith Leslie

Mrs. Atwater

Arthur Gould-porter

Alcott Anderson

Jack Pepper

Stagehand

Eddie Magill

Stagehand

Edward Clark

Doorman

Irene Martin

U.S.O. troupe

Tim Taylor

U.S.O. troupe

Claudette Thornton

U.S.O. troupe

Foster Phinney

U.S.O. troupe

Mary Castle

U.S.O. troupe

Dick Wessel

Master sergeant

Bill Meader

Photographer

Sam Finn

Photographer

Herschel Graham

Photographer

Hal Rand

Reporter

Bob Scott

Reporter

Roy Darmour

Reporter

Alex Akimoff

Waiter

George Nardelli

Waiter

Larry Arnold

Waiter

Jimmie Dundee

Sergeant

Mike Mahoney

Captain

Robert S. Scott

Lieutenant

Jack Mulhall

Major

Phyllis Godfrey

Lula Mae Bohrman

Felice Richmond

Mary Bayless

Film Details

Also Known As
Famous
Release Date
Sep 1952
Premiere Information
Los Angeles opening: 17 Sep 1952
Production Company
Paramount Pictures Corp.
Distribution Company
Paramount Pictures Corp.
Country
United States
Location
Lake Arrowhead, California, United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the short story "Famous" by Stephen Vincent Benét in Good Housekeeping (Aug 1942).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 44m
Sound
Mono
Color
Color (Technicolor)
Film Length
12 reels

Award Nominations

Best Song

1952

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

The working title of this film was Famous. Stephen Vincent Benét's short story "Famous" was also published in his collection The Last Circle (New York, 1946). According to a February 1951 Los Angeles Times news item, producer-writer Charles Brackett worked on the script of the picture, writing specifically for Bing Crosby, before leaving Paramount for Twentieth Century-Fox. Crosby reportedly wanted Judy Garland to sing several songs in the film. In the same item, Celeste Holm was announced as Crosby's probable co-star. Crosby and Jane Wyman had appeared together in Frank Capra's popular 1951 Paramount release Here Comes the Groom .
       Dick Simmons, Kit Carson, Dick Pribor and Richard Monahan are listed in Hollywood Reporter news items and production charts as cast members, but their appearance in the final film has not been confirmed. Patsy Moran also is listed, but her appearance in the film is doubtful. Location shooting took place in Lake Arrowhead, CA, according to Hollywood Reporter production charts. Although Paramount publicity materials list the Harry Warren-Leo Robin songs "The Ol' Spring Fever" and "Flight of Fancy" as being in the picture, they were not heard in the viewed print. Warren and Robin's "Zing a Little Zong" became a radio hit prior to the picture's release and was nominated for an Academy Award. On April 13, 1953, Jane Wyman reprised her role for a Lux Radio Theatre broadcast of the story, co-starring with Dick Haymes.