Jungle Fever


2h 12m 1991

Brief Synopsis

The story of a romance between a young, married African-American architect from Harlem and an Italian-American woman from Bensonhurst, and the repercussions it has on their respective social circles.

Film Details

Also Known As
Fiebre salvaje
MPAA Rating
R
Genre
Drama
Romance
Release Date
1991
Distribution Company
Universal Pictures
Location
New York City, New York, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 12m

Synopsis

The story of a romance between a young, married African-American architect from Harlem and an Italian-American woman from Bensonhurst, and the repercussions it has on their respective social circles.

Cast

Lonette Mckee

Steven Randazzo

Diane Barere

Performer

Alvin Rogers

Performer

Gina Mastrogiacomo

Anthony Nocerrino

Charles Scorsese

Theresa Randle

Mamie Louise Anderson

Melissa Meel

Performer

Talese Harris

Charles Libove

Performer

Gregory Komar

Performer

Miguel Sandoval

Jue Yao

Performer

Franc D'ambrosio

Brad Dourif

Danielle Coleman

Ruby Dee

Phyllis Yvonne Stickney

Charlie Murphy

David Dundara

Ethel Abelson

Performer

Tyra Ferrell

Dale Stuckenbruck

Performer

John Pintavalle

Performer

Clay Ruede

Performer

Ossie Davis

Suzanne Ornstein

Performer

Fred Zlotkin

Performer

Annabella Sciorra

Curtis Atkins

Wesley Snipes

Ming Yeh

Performer

Bob Stewart

Performer

Steve Berrios

Performer

Elliot Rosoff

Performer

Sanford Allen

Performer

Ricky Aiello

El-shah Muhammad

Carol Buck

Performer

Ewart Lauder

Richard Edson

Lesa Terry

Performer

Regis Iandiorio

Performer

Tim Robbins

Catherine Scorsese

John Turturro

Eileen Folson

Performer

Winterton Garvey

Performer

Larissa Blitz

Performer

Michael Imperioli

Spike Lee

Scott Rosenstock

Lead Person

Debi Mazar

Suzanna White

Myra Segal

Performer

Stanley G Hunte

Performer

Joseph Giammarino

Scot Anthony Robinson

Anne Callahan

Performer

Cecelia Hobbs Gardner

Performer

Bob Adrian

Bruce Rogers

Performer

Melvin Bethea

Frank Vincent

Doug E Doug

Frank Esposito

Joseph Diamonte

Performer

Yong-yan Hu

Performer

Gerald Tarack

Performer

Carmel Malin

Performer

Ellen Hassman

Performer

Marion Pinheiro

Performer

Lou Ann Montesi

Performer

Randolph May

Veronica Webb

Kenneth Gordon

Performer

Joseph D'onofrio

Sue Evans

Performer

Karen Griffen

Performer

Sandra Billingsloa

Performer

Diane Monroe

Performer

Averell Curtle

Bruce Wang

Performer

Yvette Brooks

Veronica Timbers

Michael Badalucco

Nick Turturro

Halle Berry

Pamala Tyson

Anthony Quinn

Barbara Bogatin

Performer

Joseph Malin

Performer

Samuel L. Jackson

Gayle Dixon

Performer

Yuri Vodovoz

Performer

Shawn Lowenthal

Queen Latifah

Richard Henrickson

Performer

Barry Finclair

Performer

Alvin Mccall

Performer

Marilyn Nelson

Crew

Lee Adams

Song

Kaseem Aiken

Other

Stuart Allen

Other

Robert M Andres

Key Grip

Albert Aquino

Boom Operator

Jacqueline Arnot

Assistant Property Master

Jerome Ashby

Other

Antony Baldasare

Props Assistant

Jeff Balsmeyer

Storyboard Artist

Gerald Barclay

Other

Jerome Bell

Other

Leonard Bembry

Other

Charles Bennis

Driver

Martin Bernstein

Construction Coordinator

Donna Berwick

Assistant

Terence Blanchard

Special Thanks To

Terence Blanchard

Original Music

Katherine Bloss

Other

Ron Bochar

Sound Effects Editor

Clifford R Booker

Hairdresser

Dwayne Bouie

Other

David Boulton

Adr

Nancy Boytos

Dresser

May H Brahe

Song

Kimberly Brewer

Song Performer

Kimberly Brewer

Music Arranger

Richard Brice

Other

Wanda Brooks

Production Assistant

Alfred Brown

Other

Christopher Brown

Other

Erwin Brown

Production Assistant

Garrett Brown

Special Thanks To

Johanne Brown

Post-Production Coordinator

Rasheed Brown

Craft Service

Robert Brown

Driver

Jennifer L Bryan

Wardrobe Supervisor

William Buckman

Driver

Keith Bunting

Grip

Bill Butler

Dresser

Calvin Byrd

Other

Jeff Byrd

Production Assistant

Joseph Caffrey

Driver

John Calling

Production Assistant

Michael Canosa

Driver

Shari Carpenter

Continuity

Ruth Carter

Costume Designer

Lawrence Casey

Other

Idreana Causby

Other

Malcolm Cecil

Other

Constance Cherry

Other

Larry M. Cherry

Hairdresser

Ted Churchill

Steadicam Operator

Darrol Clark

Other

Rodney Clark

Other

James Cleveland

Song

James Collins

Driver

Robert Collins

Driver

Brendan Connolly

Driver

Lorenzo Contessa

Other

Austin Conyers

Other

H. H. Cooper

Assistant Director

Jeffrey Cooper

Apprentice

Marcus Copeland

Other

Tom Costabile

Construction

Marko Costanzo

Foley Artist

Pierre Cottrell

Other

Aaron Cox

Other

Lamont Crawford

Grip

Richard Crudo

Steadicam Operator

Terry Cullum

Other

Rocco Curatolo

Driver

Sara D'allesandro

Scenic Artist

Jean Dane

Other

Adon Davis

Other

Lee Davis

Production Assistant

Troy Davis

Music

Victor Dejesus

Other

Louis J Delsarte

Special Thanks To

Pam Demetruis

Adr Editor

Val Desalvo

Best Boy

Anthony Dewitt

Other

John R Dexter

Other

Ernest Dickerson

Director Of Photography

Lyle Dickey

Production Assistant

Rena Dillon

Assistant

Keiko Doguchi

Adr Editor

Liza Donnell

Craft Service

Robert T Donovan

Driver

Laura Dorsey

Other

Ervin Drake

Song

Ronald Drogan

Driver

Diann Duthie

Assistant Art Director

Robert Dwyer

Driver

Rudolph Eccleston

Production Assistant

John Edler

Driver

Michael Ellis

Production Assistant

Robin Eubanks

Other

Robert Featherstone

Driver

Chris Fielder

Assistant Sound Editor

James Flatto

Music

Flavor Flav

Song

Tom Fleischman

Sound Re-Recording Mixer

Frank Fleming

Other

Randy Fletcher

Assistant Director

Kevin Flowers

Other

Susan D Fowler

Production Coordinator

Francesa Freeman

Other

Stephanie Fricker

Other

Children's Gallery

Special Thanks To

Anthony Galloway

Production Assistant

Darryl Ganious

Craft Service

Kirk Gardner

Steadicam Operator

William K. Gaskins

Driver

Michael Gaynor

Projectionist

James Geyer

Other

Anika Gibbons

Other

Ted Glass

Set Decorator

Jeffrey L Glave

Other

Kevin Golden

Other

Sonia Gonzalez

Apprentice

Ponce Granger

Driver

Chey Green

Other

Simone Greggs

Other

Randall Gregiore-bess

Other

John Grimolizzi

Other

Sarah Gyllenstierna

Other

Juliet Haffner

Other

Vaughn Halyard

Sound Design

Vaughn Halyard

Production Associate

Oscar Hammerstein Ii

Song

Emil Clayton Hampton

Steadicam Operator

R R Hanlan

Other

Sir Roland Hanna

Other

Jennie Hansen

Other

Andy Harris

Camera

Van A. Hayden

Production Assistant

Ronald M Haynes

Other

Russell Haynes

Other

Gus Hein

Driver

Sandra Hernandez

Other

Damien Heyward

Other

Daniyel Heyward

Other

Terraine Hicks

Other

Tracey Hinds

Craft Service

Milt Hinton

Music

Hollis James Hoff

Other

Patrick Hogan

Driver

Bradford L Hohle

Consultant

Garvin Holder

Other

Patricia Holmes

Production Auditor

Preston L. Holmes

Production Supervisor

Jerome F. Holway

Other

Charles Houston

Gaffer

Duane Howard

Other

Howard Howard

Other

Rosa Howell-thornhill

Other

Valerie Hughes

Other

Jason Hunt

Special Thanks To

Jonathan Iverson

Other

Mahalia Jackson

Song

Mahalia Jackson

Song Performer

Anthony L Jamison

Apprentice

Debra D Jeffreys

Production Coordinator

James Jelardi

Driver

Desiree Jellerette

Assistant Production Coordinator

Gary Jennings

Other

Keith John

Music Arranger

Brian Johnson

Assistant Sound Editor

Cliff Johnson

Driver

Kristen M Johnson

Production Assistant

Bruton Jones

Assistant

Frank Jones

Other

Kelvin Jones

Other

Mark Jones

Production Assistant

Beulah Jones-black

Assistant

Jerry Kadar

Dresser

David Kadow

Other

Sheldon Kaplan

Other

Pamela Katz

Assistant Camera Operator

Teri Kennedy

Other

Frank Kern

Foley Editor

Jon Kilik

Line Producer

Jimmie Kimbrough

Other

Courtney King

Other

Gregory King

Other

Eric Barry Klein

Assistant Location Manager

Richard Kornak

Driver

Joyce Kubalak

Other

Tom Kudlek

Dolly Grip

Tom Kudlek

Crane Grip

Kevin Ladson

Property Master

Lamond Lane

Other

Robert Lapine

Driver

Charles Laplaca

Welder

Spencer Lawrence

Special Thanks To

Bill Leavey

Driver

Harry Leavey

Driver

Jim Leavey

Transportation Captain

Carl Anthony Lee

Casting Associate

David C. Lee

Photography

Film Details

Also Known As
Fiebre salvaje
MPAA Rating
R
Genre
Drama
Romance
Release Date
1991
Distribution Company
Universal Pictures
Location
New York City, New York, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 12m

Articles

Ossie Davis (1917-2005)


Ossie Davis, the distinguished African-American character actor, director and civil rights activist, died of natural causes on February 4 in Miami Beach, where he was filming a movie. He was 87.

He was born Raiford Chatman Davis on December 18, 1917 in Cogdell, Georgia. His parents called him "R.C." When his mother registered his birth, the county clerk misunderstood her and thought she said "Ossie" instead of "R.C.," and the name stuck. He graduated high school in 1936 and was offered two scholarships: one to Savannah State College in Georgia and the other to the famed Tuskegee Institute in Alabama, but he could not afford the tuition and turned them down. He eventually saved enough money to hitchhike to Washington, D.C., where he lived with relatives while attending Howard University and studied drama.

As much as he enjoyed studying dramatics, Davis had a hunger to practice the trade professionally and in 1939, he left Howard University and headed to Harlem to work in the Rose McClendon Players, a highly respected, all-black theater ensemble in its day.

Davis' good looks and deep voice were impressive from the beginning, and he quickly joined the company and remained for three years. With the onset of World War II, Davis spent nearly four years in service, mainly as a surgical technician in an all-black Army hospital in Liberia, serving both wounded troops and local inhabitants before being transferred to Special Services to write and produce stage shows for the troops.

Back in New York in 1946, Davis debuted on Broadway in Jeb, a play about a returning black soldier who runs afoul of the Ku Klux Klan in the deep south. His co-star was Ruby Dee, an attractive leading lady who was one of the leading lights of black theater and film. Their initial romance soon developed into a lasting bond, and the two were married on December 9, 1948.

With Hollywood making much more socially conscious, adult films, particularly those that tackled themes of race (Lonely Are The Brave, Pinky, Lost Boundaries all 1949), it wasn't long before Hollywood came calling for Davis. His first film, with which he co-starred with his wife Dee, was a tense Joseph L. Mankiewicz's prison drama with strong racial overtones No Way Out (1950). He followed that up with a role as a cab driver in Henry Hathaway's Fourteen Hours (1951). Yet for the most part, Davis and Dee were primarily stage actors, and made few film appearances throughout the decade.

However, in should be noted that much of Davis time in the '50s was spent in social causes. Among them, a vocal protest against the execution of Julius and Ethel Rosenberg, and an alignment with singer and black activist Paul Robeson. Davis remained loyal to Robeson even after he was denounced by other black political, sports and show business figures for his openly communist and pro-Soviet sympathies. Such affiliation led them to suspicions in the anti-Communist witch hunts of the early '50s, but Davis, nor his wife Dee, were never openly accused of any wrongdoing.

If there was ever a decade that Ossie Davis was destined for greatness, it was undoubtly the '60s. He began with a hit Broadway show, A Raisin in the Sun in 1960, and followed that up a year later with his debut as a playwright - the satire, Purlie Victorious. In it, Davis starred as Purlie, a roustabout preacher who returns to southern Georgia with a plan to buy his former master's plantation barn and turn it into a racially integrated church.

Although not an initial success, the play would be adapted into a Tony-award winning musical, Purlie years later. Yet just as important as his stage success, was the fact that Davis' film roles became much more rich and varied: a liberal priest in John Huston's The Cardinal (1963); an unflinching tough performance as a black soldier who won't break against a sadistic sergeant's racial taunts in Sidney Lumet's searing war drama The Hill (1965); and a shrewd, evil butler who turns the tables on his employer in Rod Serling's Night Gallery (1969).

In 1970, he tried his hand at film directing, and scored a hit with Cotton Comes to Harlem (1970), a sharp urban action comedy with Godfrey Cambridge and Raymond St. Jacques as two black cops trying to stop a con artist from stealing Harlem's poor. It's generally considered the first major crossover film for the black market that was a hit with white audiences. Elsewhere, he found roles in some popular television mini-series such as King, and Roots: The Next Generation (both 1978), but for the most part, was committed to the theater.

Happily, along came Spike Lee, who revived his film career when he cast him in School Daze (1988). Davis followed that up with two more Lee films: Do the Right Thing (1989), and Jungle Fever (1991), which also co-starred his wife Dee. From there, Davis found himself in demand for senior character parts in many films throughtout the '90s: Grumpy Old Men (1993), The Client (1994), I'm Not Rappaport (1996), and HBO's remake of 12 Angry Men (1997).

Davis and Dee celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary in 1998 with the publication of a dual autobiography, In This Life Together, and in 2004, they were among the artists selected to receive the Kennedy Center Honors. Davis had been in Miami filming an independent movie called Retirement with co-stars George Segal, Rip Torn and Peter Falk.

In addition to his widow Dee, Davis is survived by three children, Nora Day, Hasna Muhammad and Guy Davis; and seven grandchildren.

by Michael T. Toole
Ossie Davis (1917-2005)

Ossie Davis (1917-2005)

Ossie Davis, the distinguished African-American character actor, director and civil rights activist, died of natural causes on February 4 in Miami Beach, where he was filming a movie. He was 87. He was born Raiford Chatman Davis on December 18, 1917 in Cogdell, Georgia. His parents called him "R.C." When his mother registered his birth, the county clerk misunderstood her and thought she said "Ossie" instead of "R.C.," and the name stuck. He graduated high school in 1936 and was offered two scholarships: one to Savannah State College in Georgia and the other to the famed Tuskegee Institute in Alabama, but he could not afford the tuition and turned them down. He eventually saved enough money to hitchhike to Washington, D.C., where he lived with relatives while attending Howard University and studied drama. As much as he enjoyed studying dramatics, Davis had a hunger to practice the trade professionally and in 1939, he left Howard University and headed to Harlem to work in the Rose McClendon Players, a highly respected, all-black theater ensemble in its day. Davis' good looks and deep voice were impressive from the beginning, and he quickly joined the company and remained for three years. With the onset of World War II, Davis spent nearly four years in service, mainly as a surgical technician in an all-black Army hospital in Liberia, serving both wounded troops and local inhabitants before being transferred to Special Services to write and produce stage shows for the troops. Back in New York in 1946, Davis debuted on Broadway in Jeb, a play about a returning black soldier who runs afoul of the Ku Klux Klan in the deep south. His co-star was Ruby Dee, an attractive leading lady who was one of the leading lights of black theater and film. Their initial romance soon developed into a lasting bond, and the two were married on December 9, 1948. With Hollywood making much more socially conscious, adult films, particularly those that tackled themes of race (Lonely Are The Brave, Pinky, Lost Boundaries all 1949), it wasn't long before Hollywood came calling for Davis. His first film, with which he co-starred with his wife Dee, was a tense Joseph L. Mankiewicz's prison drama with strong racial overtones No Way Out (1950). He followed that up with a role as a cab driver in Henry Hathaway's Fourteen Hours (1951). Yet for the most part, Davis and Dee were primarily stage actors, and made few film appearances throughout the decade. However, in should be noted that much of Davis time in the '50s was spent in social causes. Among them, a vocal protest against the execution of Julius and Ethel Rosenberg, and an alignment with singer and black activist Paul Robeson. Davis remained loyal to Robeson even after he was denounced by other black political, sports and show business figures for his openly communist and pro-Soviet sympathies. Such affiliation led them to suspicions in the anti-Communist witch hunts of the early '50s, but Davis, nor his wife Dee, were never openly accused of any wrongdoing. If there was ever a decade that Ossie Davis was destined for greatness, it was undoubtly the '60s. He began with a hit Broadway show, A Raisin in the Sun in 1960, and followed that up a year later with his debut as a playwright - the satire, Purlie Victorious. In it, Davis starred as Purlie, a roustabout preacher who returns to southern Georgia with a plan to buy his former master's plantation barn and turn it into a racially integrated church. Although not an initial success, the play would be adapted into a Tony-award winning musical, Purlie years later. Yet just as important as his stage success, was the fact that Davis' film roles became much more rich and varied: a liberal priest in John Huston's The Cardinal (1963); an unflinching tough performance as a black soldier who won't break against a sadistic sergeant's racial taunts in Sidney Lumet's searing war drama The Hill (1965); and a shrewd, evil butler who turns the tables on his employer in Rod Serling's Night Gallery (1969). In 1970, he tried his hand at film directing, and scored a hit with Cotton Comes to Harlem (1970), a sharp urban action comedy with Godfrey Cambridge and Raymond St. Jacques as two black cops trying to stop a con artist from stealing Harlem's poor. It's generally considered the first major crossover film for the black market that was a hit with white audiences. Elsewhere, he found roles in some popular television mini-series such as King, and Roots: The Next Generation (both 1978), but for the most part, was committed to the theater. Happily, along came Spike Lee, who revived his film career when he cast him in School Daze (1988). Davis followed that up with two more Lee films: Do the Right Thing (1989), and Jungle Fever (1991), which also co-starred his wife Dee. From there, Davis found himself in demand for senior character parts in many films throughtout the '90s: Grumpy Old Men (1993), The Client (1994), I'm Not Rappaport (1996), and HBO's remake of 12 Angry Men (1997). Davis and Dee celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary in 1998 with the publication of a dual autobiography, In This Life Together, and in 2004, they were among the artists selected to receive the Kennedy Center Honors. Davis had been in Miami filming an independent movie called Retirement with co-stars George Segal, Rip Torn and Peter Falk. In addition to his widow Dee, Davis is survived by three children, Nora Day, Hasna Muhammad and Guy Davis; and seven grandchildren. by Michael T. Toole

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States on Video January 16, 1992

Released in United States September 1991

Released in United States October 1991

Released in United States March 1999

Shown at Banco Nacional International Film Festival in Rio de Janeiro September 5-15, 1991.

Shown at Valladolid Film Festival October 18-26, 1991.

Stereo Surround (video)

Completed shooting December 1990.

Began shooting August 20, 1990.

Release expanded in USA June 14, 1991.

Released in United States Summer June 7, 1991

Released in United States on Video January 16, 1992

Released in United States September 1991 (Shown at Banco Nacional International Film Festival in Rio de Janeiro September 5-15, 1991.)

Released in United States October 1991 (Shown at Valladolid Film Festival October 18-26, 1991.)

Released in United States March 1999 (Shown in Los Angeles (American Cinematheque) as part of program "Out in the Streets: The Films of Spike Lee" March 15-20, 1999.)

Released in United States Summer June 7, 1991