The Jungle Book


1h 18m 1967

Brief Synopsis

Disney animation inspired by Rudyard Kiplings "Mowgli" story. Mowgli is a boy who has been raised by wolves in the Indian jungle. When the wolves hear that the fierce tiger, Shere Kahn, is nearby, they decide to send Mowgli to a local "man tribe". On his way to the village, Mowgli meets many animal characters in this musical tale. When Shere Kahn learns of Mowgli's presence, he tracks him down.

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Release Date
Jan 1967
Premiere Information
Los Angeles opening: 18 Oct 1967
Production Company
Walt Disney Productions
Distribution Company
Buena Vista Distribution Co., Inc.
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Inspired by the tales in the book The Jungle Book by Rudyard Kipling (London, 1894) and his book The Second Jungle Book (London, 1895).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 18m
Sound
Mono (RCA Sound System)
Color
Color (Technicolor)
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1, 1.75 : 1

Synopsis

While roaming about the jungle, the panther Bagheera finds Mowgli, an abandoned Indian boy baby, in a wrecked canoe and takes him to a wolf family to be reared as a cub. Ten years later, when it is learned that the ferocious tiger Shere Khan is returning to his hunting ground, the wolves fear for Mowgli's life and decide that for safety's sake he must return to the world of men. Bagheera agrees to escort the protesting boy through the jungle, where the two encounter many dangers. After successfully avoiding the hypnotic designs of the snake Kaa, the travelers meet Colonel Hathi's elephant herd. Exasperated by Mowgli's continual disobedience, Bagheera deserts the boy, who is then befriended by the bear Baloo, a singing, dancing jungle bum. When Mowgli is kidnaped by monkeys, Baloo persuades Bagheera to help, and the three escape just as the ape King Louie's temple crumbles. Determined to remain in the jungle, Mowgli runs away and wanders into a vultures' hangout. The birds at first tease him but later befriend the lonely boy. When Shere Khan appears, the vultures take to the trees; and Mowgli must face the tiger alone. To his surprise, he is helped by his jungle friends, and, tying a burning branch to Shere Khan's tail, Mowgli frightens the tiger away. Now nothing stands in the way of Mowgli's remaining in the jungle. A chance meeting with a young Indian girl offers a stronger attraction, however, and Bagheera and Baloo depart knowing that Mowgli will be happier with his own kind. (The voices heard in the songs are those of Louis Prima, singing "I Wanna Be Like You"; Sterling Holloway, singing "Kaa's Song"; Darleen Carr, singing "My Own Home"; Chad Stuart and Lord Tim Hudson, singing "That's What Friends Are For"; Verna Felton and Clint Howard, singing "Colonel Hathi's March"; and Phil Harris, singing "The Bare Necessities".)

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Release Date
Jan 1967
Premiere Information
Los Angeles opening: 18 Oct 1967
Production Company
Walt Disney Productions
Distribution Company
Buena Vista Distribution Co., Inc.
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Inspired by the tales in the book The Jungle Book by Rudyard Kipling (London, 1894) and his book The Second Jungle Book (London, 1895).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 18m
Sound
Mono (RCA Sound System)
Color
Color (Technicolor)
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1, 1.75 : 1

Award Nominations

Best Song

1967

Articles

Frank Thomas (1912-2004)


Legendary Disney animator Frank Thomas, whose work ranged from such '30s classics like Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs to equally acclaimed modern hits like The Rescuers, died on September 8 in his home in Flintridge, California. He had been in declining health since suffering a brain hemorrhage several months ago. He was 92.

He was born on September 5, 1912 in Santa Monica, California. He showed an interest in art and drawing at a very young age, so it came as no surprise when he graduated from Stanford University in 1934 with a degree in art. Soon after, he began work for Walt Disney Studios and did his first animation for the short Mickey's Elephant in 1936, and was one of the key animators for the studios' first, feature-length animated picture, Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs (1937). His memorable creations of the seven dwarfs offered an emotional sweep and humorous detail to animated characters that audiences had never experienced before, and his career was set.

Thomas' work from this point on would be nothing short of the high watermarks in Disney animation that is justly cherished the world over: the title character in Pinocchio, (1940); Thumper teaching Bambi to skate in Bambi (1941); the wicked stepmother in Cinderella (1950), the Queen of Hearts in Alice in Wonderland (1951), the terrific fight sequence between Captain Hook and Peter Pan in Peter Pan (1953); the Lady and Rover falling in love over a dish of spaghetti and meatballs in Lady and the Tramp (1955); the three good fairies in Sleeping Beauty (1959); Baloo, Mowgli and Kaa in The Jungle Book (1967); and his final work of Bernard and Bianca in the underrated The Rescuers (1977).

Thomas retired from Disney in early 1978, ending a near 44-year relationship with the studio. With longtime friend, and fellow Disney collaborator Ollie Johnston, they went on to author many fine books about the art of animation, most notably Disney Animation: The Illusion of Life (Hyperian Press, 1978) and The Disney Villain (Hyperion Press, 1993). He is survived by his wife of 58 years, Jeanette; sons Thomas, Doug and Gregg; daughter Ann Ayers; and three grandchildren.

by Michael T. Toole
Frank Thomas (1912-2004)

Frank Thomas (1912-2004)

Legendary Disney animator Frank Thomas, whose work ranged from such '30s classics like Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs to equally acclaimed modern hits like The Rescuers, died on September 8 in his home in Flintridge, California. He had been in declining health since suffering a brain hemorrhage several months ago. He was 92. He was born on September 5, 1912 in Santa Monica, California. He showed an interest in art and drawing at a very young age, so it came as no surprise when he graduated from Stanford University in 1934 with a degree in art. Soon after, he began work for Walt Disney Studios and did his first animation for the short Mickey's Elephant in 1936, and was one of the key animators for the studios' first, feature-length animated picture, Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs (1937). His memorable creations of the seven dwarfs offered an emotional sweep and humorous detail to animated characters that audiences had never experienced before, and his career was set. Thomas' work from this point on would be nothing short of the high watermarks in Disney animation that is justly cherished the world over: the title character in Pinocchio, (1940); Thumper teaching Bambi to skate in Bambi (1941); the wicked stepmother in Cinderella (1950), the Queen of Hearts in Alice in Wonderland (1951), the terrific fight sequence between Captain Hook and Peter Pan in Peter Pan (1953); the Lady and Rover falling in love over a dish of spaghetti and meatballs in Lady and the Tramp (1955); the three good fairies in Sleeping Beauty (1959); Baloo, Mowgli and Kaa in The Jungle Book (1967); and his final work of Bernard and Bianca in the underrated The Rescuers (1977). Thomas retired from Disney in early 1978, ending a near 44-year relationship with the studio. With longtime friend, and fellow Disney collaborator Ollie Johnston, they went on to author many fine books about the art of animation, most notably Disney Animation: The Illusion of Life (Hyperian Press, 1978) and The Disney Villain (Hyperion Press, 1993). He is survived by his wife of 58 years, Jeanette; sons Thomas, Doug and Gregg; daughter Ann Ayers; and three grandchildren. by Michael T. Toole

Quotes

Now this takes the brains, not the brawns.
- Bagheera
You better believe it and I'm loaded with both.
- Baloo
Ha-ha, so you're the mancub? Crazy.
- King Louie
I'm not as crazy as you are, put me down.
- Mowgli
Hey Flaps, So what we were going to do?
- Buzzie
I don't know, what'cha onwanna do?
- Flaps
Look Flaps, first I say "what were going to do?" then you say "I don't know, what'cha wanna do?" then I say "what we're going to do" then you say what'cha wanna do" let's do something.
- Buzzie
Ok. What'cha wanna do?
- Flaps
Ha-Ha! Man that's what I call a swinging party.
- Baloo
Oh No! It's Baloo, that stupid face, jungle bum.
- Bagheera

Trivia

The last film personally overseen by Walt Disney.

Phil Harris, the voice of Baloo the bear in Disney's "The Jungle Book," also played the voice of a bear in another Disney film: he was Little John in Robin Hood (1973).

Walt Disney told his animation crew to "throw away" Rudyard Kipling's book, "The Jungle Book" because the resulting storyboards were too dark and dramatic. "Bear Necessities", was the only song he liked and kept because the music along with the draft was also too dark and dramatic.

Baloo means bear in Hindi.

Hathi in 'Colonel Hathi' means elephant in Hindi.

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States 1978

Released in United States Fall October 1967

Released in United States on Video May 3, 1991

Re-released in United States 1978

Re-released in United States 1984

Re-released in United States July 13, 1990

Re-released in United States on Video October 14, 1997

The last animated film to be produced under Walt Disney's personal supervision.

Released in United States 1978 (Shown at FILMEX: Los Angeles International Film Exposition (Special Programs - Painted Movies) April 13 - May 7, 1978.)

Re-released in United States 1978

Re-released in United States 1984

Released in United States on Video May 3, 1991

Re-released in United States July 13, 1990

Released in United States Fall October 1967

Re-released in United States on Video October 14, 1997 (as "30th Anniversary Limited Edition")