Joy Ride


60m 1958

Brief Synopsis

Paul (Rad Fulton) and three other punks, Arnie (Nicholas King), Vince (Robert Levin) and Dirk (Jim Bridges), are admiring a parked sports car and intending to take it for a joy ride, when they are surprised by its owner, Miles (Regis Toomey) who orders them away and is met with a barrage of fifthy names. A few nights later they break into Miles' garage and he catches them and threatens to call the police. Paul tells him they want the car for a ride and they will have it sooner or later. The young hoods then launch a campaign of terror against Miles and his wife (Ann Doran). Paul realizes he has more pleasure in frightening Miles than in trying to get the car, and one day they force their way into the Miles home and brutally attack Mrs. Miles after she refuses to produce the car keys. Now thinking that Miles is in his power, Paul meets him to take delivery of the car. When Paul steps into the car, Miles pulls a gun and orders him to drive out of town at a breakneck speed. The more frightened Paul becomes, the more dangerously Miles makes him drive, until finally, in tears, Paul begs to be allowed to stop his "joy ride." Miles directs him to pull up in front of the police station and Paul's arrest is followed by that of the other three boys.

Film Details

Release Date
Oct 1958
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Allied Artists Pictures Corp.
Distribution Company
Allied Artists Pictures Corp.
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the short story "Joy Ride" by C. B. Gilford in Ellery Queen Mystery Magazine (Jan 1957).

Technical Specs

Duration
60m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Film Length
5,959ft

Synopsis

One evening, four teenagers, Paul, Arnie, Dirk and Vince, come upon a new Thunderbird sports car and boldly consider taking the car for a joy ride. When the owner, middle-aged Miles, startles the boys and then declines to allow them to drive the car, Paul responds with an outburst of abusive language. Taken aback and frightened, Miles contacts the police, but when he admits he cannot identify the boys, the police declare there is little they can do. A few nights later, Miles discovers the boys trying to break into his garage, but Paul remains scornful and belligerent when Miles threatens to summon the police. Declaring that he will force Miles to allow them access to the car, Paul leads the boys on a campaign to bully Miles into acquiescence. Despite his mounting apprehension, Miles refuses to sign a complaint against two teens whom the police pick up during a stakeout of the neighborhood. Miles later refuses to make a false identification against three other teenagers arrested in a stolen car. Taking pleasure in Miles's increasing fear, however, Paul and the boys soon ignore the pretext of taking the car and one night break into Miles's home, where they set about terrorizing his wife Grace until she collapses. Miles then agrees to meet with Paul to allow him to drive the Thunderbird. On the night of the meeting, Miles surprises the boys by drawing a gun and forcing Paul behind the wheel. Miles makes the increasingly terrified Paul drive faster and faster until the young man pleads to stop. Miles then has Paul drive the car to police headquarters, but once there declines to press charges, certain he has taught the boys a lesson.

Film Details

Release Date
Oct 1958
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Allied Artists Pictures Corp.
Distribution Company
Allied Artists Pictures Corp.
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the short story "Joy Ride" by C. B. Gilford in Ellery Queen Mystery Magazine (Jan 1957).

Technical Specs

Duration
60m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Film Length
5,959ft

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

According to information contained in the file on the film in the MPAA/PCA Collection at the AMPAS Library, the script for Joy Ride was initially found unacceptable due to the extreme "antisocial and downright sadistic comportment of the delinquents" and the emphasis of the entire script on the psychological torture with little attention given to the teenagers' apprehension. Correspondence in the file suggests the script was altered, although concern was still expressed by the PCA over the prolonged violence in the story. Hollywood Reporter news items add Marilyn Carroll, William Green, Steve Stevens, Ann Molinari and Gene Streett to the cast, but their appearance in the final film has not been confirmed.