The Joy Luck Club


2h 15m 1993
The Joy Luck Club

Brief Synopsis

Four Asian-American women work through complicated relationships with their mothers.

Film Details

Also Known As
Joy Luck Club
MPAA Rating
R
Genre
Drama
Adaptation
Romance
Release Date
1993
Distribution Company
Walt Disney Studios Distribution
Location
San Francisco, California, USA; Berkeley, California, USA; Los Angeles, California, USA; Shanghai, China

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 15m

Synopsis

Stories told by four elderly Chinese women and their American-born daughters while playing mah-jongg.

Crew

Bill Abbott

Music Editor

Danelle Adami

Production Assistant

Gene Agress

Thanks

Matias Alvarez

Assistant Director

Bill Angarola

Sound Effects Editor

Carrie Angland

Makeup Assistant

C J Appel

Assistant Editor

Jim Ashwell

Foley Mixer

Clement Bacque

Caterer

Terry Baliel

Hair Stylist

Donnell Barnes

Other

Ron Bass

Screenplay

Ron Bass

Producer

Diane Batson-smith

Unit Production Manager

Vicki Beck

Camera Trainee

Michael Becker

Costumes

Juel Bestrop

Casting Consultant

Tommy Boyce

Song

Risa Bramon Garcia

Casting

Phil Bray

Photography

Marcei A Brubaker

Assistant Director

Kim Burns

Production Assistant

Donald Graham Burt

Production Designer

Tony Cappelli

Foley Editor

Cho Tak Chan

Key Grip

Marjorie K Chan

Wardrobe Supervisor

Tim Chau

Sound Editor

Mishka Chen

Technical Advisor

Anna Chi

Assistant

Vivian Chiang

Consultant

Kong Hon Chien

Assistant Director

Michael Chin

Camera Operator

Angela D Chou

Art Department Coordinator

Curtis Choy

Sound Mixer

Stephen F. Collins

Transportation Coordinator

Craig Comstock

Production Assistant

Carolyn Crimley

Other

Jonathan Cupp

Office Assistant

Devon Curry

Adr Supervisor

Robert Dalva

Editing

Sandy De Crescent

Music Conductor

Rob Doumitt

Best Boy

Antonin Dvorak

Song

Laura Folger

Extras Agent/Coordinator

Carole Fontana

Production Supervisor

Carole Fontana

Unit Production Manager

Rick Franklin

Sound Effects Editor

Wen Xia Fu

Assistant

Sandy Fu Chin

Consultant

Ol Lee Fung

Production Assistant

Maxine E Garcia

Production Coordinator

Stephen J Gardner

Assistant Property Master

Albert Gasser

Sound Effects Editor

Gary Gegan

Sound Re-Recording Mixer

Cullen Gerst

Office Assistant

Gerry Goffin

Song

Stephan Goldman

Music Supervisor

Lewis Goldstein

Dialogue Editor

Francey Grace

Post-Production Supervisor

Scott Guitteau

Assistant Editor

Robin Gurland

Location Casting

Oscar Hammerstein Ii

Song

Bobby Hart

Song

Barbara Hartman-jenichen

Costumes

David A Hayden

Thanks

Gary Hecker

Foley Artist

Jan M Heyneker

Key Grip

Carol A Hight

Hair Assistant

Carmen Hocson

Assistant Sound Editor

Brian Hofstetter

Office Assistant

Eileen Horta

Adr Editor

Maysie Hoy

Editor

Jin Xin Huang

Production Assistant

Karen Hughes

Production Coordinator

Karen Hughes

Assistant

Mai Huynh

Office Assistant

Matthew Iadarola

Sound Re-Recording Mixer

Rod Janusch

Grip

Ko Tai Jin

Costumes

Zhi Bai Jin

Props

Ji-pin "jim" Jing

Production Assistant

Karen Johnston

Casting Associate

Gloria Kaiser

Color Timer

Kenn Kashima

Video Playback

Barbara Kassal

Costume Supervisor

Christopher Kelly

Construction Coordinator

Donald E Kerns

Foreman

Mikella Kievman

Casting Associate

Carole King

Song

Josh King

Assistant Director

Chan Wai Kong

Production Assistant

Josh Koral

Property Master

Diana Kunce

Art Director

Kwan Kit Kwok

Art Director

Kimberly Lambert

Dialogue Editor

Michael A Lang

Song Performer

Michael A Lang

Song

George Leong

Boom Operator

Heidi Levitt

Casting

Jian Jun Li

Art Director

Edward D Lin

Office Assistant

Peggy Ling

Consultant

Yang Ling

Production Assistant

Jessinta Liu

Associate Producer

Steven S Liu

Office Assistant

Leo M Loverro

Dolly Grip

Debbie Lum

Post-Production Assistant

Bobby Mackston

Dialogue Editor

Patrick Markey

Producer

Theresa Repola Mohammed

Negative Cutting

Amir Mokri

Director Of Photography

Michael Morell

Thanks

Joel Moss

Music

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart

Music

Susan Muir

Production Accountant

John Neufeld

Original Music

Dan O'connell

Foley Artist

Valli O'reilly

Makeup Artist

Leslie Park

Script Supervisor

Ellen Parks

Location Casting

Alessandra Pasquino

Assistant

Jeff Payne

Assistant Sound Editor

Rachel Portman

Original Music

Rachel Portman

Music

Eddie Powell

Thanks

Robert E Powell

Rigging Gaffer

Jim Poynter

Set Decorator

Hua Qin

Production Assistant

Hua Quian

Accountant

J.a.c. Redford

Music Conductor

Charlene Richards

Adr Mixer

John Richards

Music

Jay Roberts

Accounting Assistant

Richard Rodgers

Song

Catherine Roehl

Accounting Assistant

John Rotondi

Other

Carolann Sanchez-shapiro

Assistant Sound Editor

Ke Wen Sang

Props

Mark Shankel

Dolly Grip

Jonathan Shedd

Location Manager

Patrick Shellenberger

Gaffer

Eva Shen

Interpreter

Michael Smuin

Choreographer

Oliver Stone

Executive Producer

Amy Tan

Book As Source Material

Amy Tan

Producer

Amy Tan

Screenplay

Yun Xia Tan

Makeup Assistant

Lydia Tanji

Costume Designer

Frank Tartantino

Special Effects Coordinator

Sean Thomas

Post-Production Assistant

Tiny Trammell

Transportation Captain

Elizabeth Tullis

Scenic Artist

Kristopher Van Over

Assistant Camera Operator

Patricia A Van Over

Assistant Camera Operator

Mary Vernieu

Location Casting

De Xiang Wang

Gaffer

Lisa Wang

Production Assistant

Suzanne Wang

Office Assistant

Wayne Wang

Producer

Jennifer Greisz West

Assistant Production Coordinator

James Wilhelm

Craft Service

Stefanie Wiseman

Assistant Editor

James Wong

Song

Sherwin Wong

Production Assistant

Yiu Fai Wong

Assistant Art Director

De Gen Yang

Assistant Director

Janet Yang

Executive Producer

Ruby Yang

Assistant Editor

Lai Fa Yuan

Production Assistant

Midy Yuan

Hairdresser

Jerry Zhang

Production Assistant

Yi Hua Zhang

Foreman

Film Details

Also Known As
Joy Luck Club
MPAA Rating
R
Genre
Drama
Adaptation
Romance
Release Date
1993
Distribution Company
Walt Disney Studios Distribution
Location
San Francisco, California, USA; Berkeley, California, USA; Los Angeles, California, USA; Shanghai, China

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 15m

Articles

The Joy Luck Club


Four Chinese women living in San Francisco and their American born adult daughters share the fascinating and often harrowing stories of their lives in The Joy Luck Club (1993). Based on Amy Tan's bestselling novel of the same name, The Joy Luck Club was produced by Oliver Stone and directed by Wayne Wang (Smoke [1995]). Each story is beautifully told in a series of vignettes that feature the astounding talents of Hollywood's largely untapped wealth of Asian-American actresses. The Joy Luck Club is about mothers and daughters struggling to understand each other, the clash between generations and cultures, and the hopes and disappointments that sometimes accompany the American Dream.

Amy Tan's 1989 book, inspired by her own Chinese mother, was a surprise hit in the literary world. The Joy Luck Club remained on the New York Times Best Seller list for 75 weeks and was translated into 23 languages worldwide. Before the book was even published, Tan had interest from Hollywood.

Janet Yang, then an executive at MCA/Universal, had read some early drafts of The Joy Luck Club in 1988 and loved it. A full year before the book hit stores, she met with Amy Tan to discuss the possibility of selling the book as a movie project. Since stories about Asian-Americans were all but non-existent in Hollywood, it would be a tough sell.

The project was met with rejection at first. However, when the novel began to climb the Best Seller list, Tan received several offers from Hollywood to option the book. She turned them all down. "I was still not sure the book should be a movie," Tan says in her 2003 memoir The Opposite of Fate. "What if the movie was made and it was a terrible depiction of Asian-Americans?" She was riddled with fear and doubt about what Hollywood might do to her story, and she wanted to be sure of her decision.

In August 1989 Tan met with Chinese-American director Wayne Wang through their mutual agency, CAA. Wang, who had just completed Eat a Bowl of Tea (1989), wasn't particularly interested in doing another Chinese themed film. However, he was impressed with Tan's book and was open to bringing The Joy Luck Club to the big screen. The two clicked immediately. "After a wonderful conversation about everything from the book to family to Asians and Asian-Americans in the arts, I knew intuitively that Wayne was the right person to direct the movie," says Tan in her memoir.

Soon Oscar®-winning screenwriter Ronald Bass (Rain Man [1988]) joined Tan and Wang to help write the screenplay. Tan had already received a lot of negative feedback from people about how difficult it would be to turn the novel into a script. The novel was too complicated. It had too many characters to keep up with. It had too many different storylines. It didn't have any single cohesive element. Creating a screenplay would be a daunting task, to be sure, but Bass convinced Tan and Wang that it could be done. First, Bass said, all the rules that normally applied to screenplay writing would have to be tossed out the window. There would have to be extensive voice over. It would have to be an ensemble piece rather than a focus on any one particular character. There would be a framing device added of a bon voyage party to pull all the different stories together and help smooth out the numerous transitions between flashbacks. "Ron," says Tan in her memoir, "was the only person I met who knew exactly how to turn the book into a movie."

Meanwhile, Janet Yang, who had been behind the project from day one, was now the Vice President of Oliver Stone's production company, Ixtlan. With Yang's encouragement, Stone became a co-Executive Producer on The Joy Luck Club. Stone said he could help get the film made through a deal he had at the time with Carolco Pictures.

However, the one thing that Amy Tan, Ron Bass and Wayne Wang wanted above all else was to make sure that they maintained creative control of the project. Unfortunately, Carolco could not provide that assurance, and the deal fell apart. Following this setback, Ron Bass convinced Tan and Wang that the only way that they would be able to maintain creative control over the material would be to develop the screenplay by themselves before making any deal.

Tan and Bass completed their first draft of the screenplay in November 1991, and Ixtlan (Oliver Stone's company) circulated it around Hollywood. In March 1992 Tan, Bass and Wang met with executives at the Hollywood Pictures branch of Disney Studios, including then Disney Studios Chairman Jeffrey Katzenberg. To their surprise, Disney was very interested in The Joy Luck Club. Katzenberg told Wang that the script reminded him of the popular Academy Award-winning film Terms of Endearment (1983). Disney wanted to focus on the story's universal themes. "(Katzenberg) wanted to know that (we) weren't looking to do something that would just play to art houses," Ronald Bass told Entertainment Weekly in 1993. When the trio agreed, The Joy Luck Club had a green light, and Katzenberg handed over the creative control that they had been seeking. It was a victory and a relief. "We would be able to make our movie like an independent production," recalls Tan, "and we'd be supported by Hollywood Pictures."

Before shooting began, the creative trio continued to collaborate on several more drafts of the screenplay. Each contributed an important and unique role to each version of the story. "In general," says Tan in her memoir, "I was the arbiter of character questions - that is, whether a scene seemed true to the heart and soul of what I felt about the characters as I knew them. Ron's hobbyhorse was overall structure and emotional truth...Wayne, we realized, had to be the final arbiter on everything, because he was, after all, the director, and had to feel that everything was as he wanted to see it on the screen."

With a relatively low $10.6 million budget, The Joy Luck Club began shooting in November 1992. The fine cast of almost all Asian-American actors including Ming-Na Wen, Tamlyn Tomita, Lauren Tom and Rosalind Chao gathered for 10 weeks of filming on location in San Francisco. Later, the production moved to China for one additional month of location shooting in the midst of some uncharacteristically cold weather.

Despite the positive experience she was having with her first movie, Amy Tan never stopped being concerned over how the final version of The Joy Luck Club would turn out. She knew that the success or failure of the film would very likely determine the future of Hollywood films with Asian-American themes. "That's a terrible burden," says Tan, "especially when you're just trying to create your own vision and not necessarily right past wrongs, or set the record straight on the history of China, or break down cultural barriers, or open film job markets for other Asian-Americans, or put every single stereotype to rest once and for all...Our abiding thought was this: If we could make a movie that seemed honest and true, a movie about real people who happened to be Chinese-American," says Tan, "we would have a better shot at making a movie that people would want to see, that they would be moved by, that would get them talking to their friends and so give the movie legs. It might thus bring in enough receipts to change Hollywood's mind that movies about Asian-Americans can't be successful."

The Joy Luck Club opened strong in limited release in September 1993, and positive word of mouth soon spread. The decision to focus on the story's strengths and universal appeal more than made up for the lack of big stars in the ensemble cast. Disney's gamble had paid off. "Our film is trying to bring to the theater people who are not Asians," Ronald Bass told Entertainment Weekly in 1993, "to have them look up on the screen and see Asian faces and walk away feeling they aren't that different from these people."

Reviews were exceptionally positive. "Handsomely brought to the screen...The Joy Luck Club is anything but a traditional woman's picture," said Janet Maslin of the New York Times. "As directed simply and forcefully by Wayne Wang, with a screenplay skillfully written by Ms. Tan and Ronald Bass, The Joy Luck Club is both sweeping and intimate, a lovely evocation of changing cultures and enduring family ties. Admirers of the best-selling novel will be delighted by the graceful way it has been transferred to the screen. Those unfamiliar with the book will simply appreciate a stirring, many-sided fable, one that is exceptionally well told." Newsweek said, "Melodramatic? Manipulative? Sure, at times, but great storytellers can get away with anything, and the trio behind this film are in that class. Director Wayne Wang and screenwriters Ronald Bass and Tan herself have come up with a shamelessly irresistible tale. The first-rate cast is another treat. Indulge yourself." "Beautifully made and acted and emotionally moving in the bargain," said Variety, "this dramatic study of trying relationships between Chinese mothers and daughters through the century will be widely accessible to all viewers."

Producer: Ronald Bass, Patrick Markey, Amy Tan
Director: Wayne Wang
Screenplay: Amy Tan, Ronald Bass; Amy Tan (novel)
Cinematography: Amir Mokri
Art Direction: Diana Kunce
Music: Rachel Portman
Film Editing: Maysie Hoy
Cast: Kieu Chinh (Suyuan Woo), Tsai Chin (Lindo Jong), France Nuyen (Ying-Ying St. Clair), Lisa Lu (An-Mei Hsu), Ming-Na Wen (Jing-Mei 'June' Woo), Tamlyn Tomita (Waverly Jong), Lauren Tom (Lena St. Clair), Rosalind Chao (Rose Hsu Jordan)
C-135m. Letterboxed.

by Andrea Passafiume
The Joy Luck Club

The Joy Luck Club

Four Chinese women living in San Francisco and their American born adult daughters share the fascinating and often harrowing stories of their lives in The Joy Luck Club (1993). Based on Amy Tan's bestselling novel of the same name, The Joy Luck Club was produced by Oliver Stone and directed by Wayne Wang (Smoke [1995]). Each story is beautifully told in a series of vignettes that feature the astounding talents of Hollywood's largely untapped wealth of Asian-American actresses. The Joy Luck Club is about mothers and daughters struggling to understand each other, the clash between generations and cultures, and the hopes and disappointments that sometimes accompany the American Dream. Amy Tan's 1989 book, inspired by her own Chinese mother, was a surprise hit in the literary world. The Joy Luck Club remained on the New York Times Best Seller list for 75 weeks and was translated into 23 languages worldwide. Before the book was even published, Tan had interest from Hollywood. Janet Yang, then an executive at MCA/Universal, had read some early drafts of The Joy Luck Club in 1988 and loved it. A full year before the book hit stores, she met with Amy Tan to discuss the possibility of selling the book as a movie project. Since stories about Asian-Americans were all but non-existent in Hollywood, it would be a tough sell. The project was met with rejection at first. However, when the novel began to climb the Best Seller list, Tan received several offers from Hollywood to option the book. She turned them all down. "I was still not sure the book should be a movie," Tan says in her 2003 memoir The Opposite of Fate. "What if the movie was made and it was a terrible depiction of Asian-Americans?" She was riddled with fear and doubt about what Hollywood might do to her story, and she wanted to be sure of her decision. In August 1989 Tan met with Chinese-American director Wayne Wang through their mutual agency, CAA. Wang, who had just completed Eat a Bowl of Tea (1989), wasn't particularly interested in doing another Chinese themed film. However, he was impressed with Tan's book and was open to bringing The Joy Luck Club to the big screen. The two clicked immediately. "After a wonderful conversation about everything from the book to family to Asians and Asian-Americans in the arts, I knew intuitively that Wayne was the right person to direct the movie," says Tan in her memoir. Soon Oscar®-winning screenwriter Ronald Bass (Rain Man [1988]) joined Tan and Wang to help write the screenplay. Tan had already received a lot of negative feedback from people about how difficult it would be to turn the novel into a script. The novel was too complicated. It had too many characters to keep up with. It had too many different storylines. It didn't have any single cohesive element. Creating a screenplay would be a daunting task, to be sure, but Bass convinced Tan and Wang that it could be done. First, Bass said, all the rules that normally applied to screenplay writing would have to be tossed out the window. There would have to be extensive voice over. It would have to be an ensemble piece rather than a focus on any one particular character. There would be a framing device added of a bon voyage party to pull all the different stories together and help smooth out the numerous transitions between flashbacks. "Ron," says Tan in her memoir, "was the only person I met who knew exactly how to turn the book into a movie." Meanwhile, Janet Yang, who had been behind the project from day one, was now the Vice President of Oliver Stone's production company, Ixtlan. With Yang's encouragement, Stone became a co-Executive Producer on The Joy Luck Club. Stone said he could help get the film made through a deal he had at the time with Carolco Pictures. However, the one thing that Amy Tan, Ron Bass and Wayne Wang wanted above all else was to make sure that they maintained creative control of the project. Unfortunately, Carolco could not provide that assurance, and the deal fell apart. Following this setback, Ron Bass convinced Tan and Wang that the only way that they would be able to maintain creative control over the material would be to develop the screenplay by themselves before making any deal. Tan and Bass completed their first draft of the screenplay in November 1991, and Ixtlan (Oliver Stone's company) circulated it around Hollywood. In March 1992 Tan, Bass and Wang met with executives at the Hollywood Pictures branch of Disney Studios, including then Disney Studios Chairman Jeffrey Katzenberg. To their surprise, Disney was very interested in The Joy Luck Club. Katzenberg told Wang that the script reminded him of the popular Academy Award-winning film Terms of Endearment (1983). Disney wanted to focus on the story's universal themes. "(Katzenberg) wanted to know that (we) weren't looking to do something that would just play to art houses," Ronald Bass told Entertainment Weekly in 1993. When the trio agreed, The Joy Luck Club had a green light, and Katzenberg handed over the creative control that they had been seeking. It was a victory and a relief. "We would be able to make our movie like an independent production," recalls Tan, "and we'd be supported by Hollywood Pictures." Before shooting began, the creative trio continued to collaborate on several more drafts of the screenplay. Each contributed an important and unique role to each version of the story. "In general," says Tan in her memoir, "I was the arbiter of character questions - that is, whether a scene seemed true to the heart and soul of what I felt about the characters as I knew them. Ron's hobbyhorse was overall structure and emotional truth...Wayne, we realized, had to be the final arbiter on everything, because he was, after all, the director, and had to feel that everything was as he wanted to see it on the screen." With a relatively low $10.6 million budget, The Joy Luck Club began shooting in November 1992. The fine cast of almost all Asian-American actors including Ming-Na Wen, Tamlyn Tomita, Lauren Tom and Rosalind Chao gathered for 10 weeks of filming on location in San Francisco. Later, the production moved to China for one additional month of location shooting in the midst of some uncharacteristically cold weather. Despite the positive experience she was having with her first movie, Amy Tan never stopped being concerned over how the final version of The Joy Luck Club would turn out. She knew that the success or failure of the film would very likely determine the future of Hollywood films with Asian-American themes. "That's a terrible burden," says Tan, "especially when you're just trying to create your own vision and not necessarily right past wrongs, or set the record straight on the history of China, or break down cultural barriers, or open film job markets for other Asian-Americans, or put every single stereotype to rest once and for all...Our abiding thought was this: If we could make a movie that seemed honest and true, a movie about real people who happened to be Chinese-American," says Tan, "we would have a better shot at making a movie that people would want to see, that they would be moved by, that would get them talking to their friends and so give the movie legs. It might thus bring in enough receipts to change Hollywood's mind that movies about Asian-Americans can't be successful." The Joy Luck Club opened strong in limited release in September 1993, and positive word of mouth soon spread. The decision to focus on the story's strengths and universal appeal more than made up for the lack of big stars in the ensemble cast. Disney's gamble had paid off. "Our film is trying to bring to the theater people who are not Asians," Ronald Bass told Entertainment Weekly in 1993, "to have them look up on the screen and see Asian faces and walk away feeling they aren't that different from these people." Reviews were exceptionally positive. "Handsomely brought to the screen...The Joy Luck Club is anything but a traditional woman's picture," said Janet Maslin of the New York Times. "As directed simply and forcefully by Wayne Wang, with a screenplay skillfully written by Ms. Tan and Ronald Bass, The Joy Luck Club is both sweeping and intimate, a lovely evocation of changing cultures and enduring family ties. Admirers of the best-selling novel will be delighted by the graceful way it has been transferred to the screen. Those unfamiliar with the book will simply appreciate a stirring, many-sided fable, one that is exceptionally well told." Newsweek said, "Melodramatic? Manipulative? Sure, at times, but great storytellers can get away with anything, and the trio behind this film are in that class. Director Wayne Wang and screenwriters Ronald Bass and Tan herself have come up with a shamelessly irresistible tale. The first-rate cast is another treat. Indulge yourself." "Beautifully made and acted and emotionally moving in the bargain," said Variety, "this dramatic study of trying relationships between Chinese mothers and daughters through the century will be widely accessible to all viewers." Producer: Ronald Bass, Patrick Markey, Amy Tan Director: Wayne Wang Screenplay: Amy Tan, Ronald Bass; Amy Tan (novel) Cinematography: Amir Mokri Art Direction: Diana Kunce Music: Rachel Portman Film Editing: Maysie Hoy Cast: Kieu Chinh (Suyuan Woo), Tsai Chin (Lindo Jong), France Nuyen (Ying-Ying St. Clair), Lisa Lu (An-Mei Hsu), Ming-Na Wen (Jing-Mei 'June' Woo), Tamlyn Tomita (Waverly Jong), Lauren Tom (Lena St. Clair), Rosalind Chao (Rose Hsu Jordan) C-135m. Letterboxed. by Andrea Passafiume

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Ron Bass and Amy Tan were nominated for best adapted screenplay (1993) by the Writers Guild of America.

Released in United States Fall September 8, 1993

Wide Release in United States October 1, 1993

Expanded Release in United States October 8, 1993

Expanded Release in United States October 15, 1993

Expanded Release in United States October 22, 1993

Released in United States on Video March 30, 1994

Released in United States September 1993

Released in United States August 2001

Shown at Toronto Festival of Festivals September 9-18, 1993.

Shown at Lorcarno International Film Festival August 2-12, 2001.

Based on the novel "The Joy Luck Club" by Amy Tan; published by Ivy Books in 1989.

Heidi Levitt and Risa Bramon Garcia received the Casting Society of America's Artio Award for their work casting this film.

Began shooting November 9, 1992.

Completed shooting March 4, 1993.

In memory of Hsu Ying Li.

Platform release in Chicago, Toronto, Montreal and Vancouver September 17, 1993.

Released in United States Fall September 8, 1993

Wide Release in United States October 1, 1993

Expanded Release in United States October 8, 1993

Expanded Release in United States October 15, 1993

Expanded Release in United States October 22, 1993

Released in United States on Video March 30, 1994

Released in United States September 1993 (Shown at Telluride Film Festival September 3-6, 1993.)

Released in United States September 1993 (Shown at Toronto Festival of Festivals September 9-18, 1993.)

Released in United States August 2001 (Shown at Lorcarno International Film Festival August 2-12, 2001.)

Platform release in Boston, Dallas, Honolulu, Houston, Kansas City, Philadelphia, Sacramento, San Diego, Seattle and Washington, DC September 24, 1993.

Nominated for the 1994 British Academy of Film & Television Arts (BAFTA) Award for Best Adapted Screenplay.