Joe Versus the Volcano


1h 42m 1990

Brief Synopsis

Convinced that he's dying, a man agrees to jump into a volcano to save an island from an angry god.

Film Details

Also Known As
Joe Against the Volcano, Joe contra el Volcán, Joe contre le volcan, Joe och vulkanen, Joe vs. the Volcano
MPAA Rating
Genre
Comedy
Adventure
Fantasy
Romantic Comedy
Release Date
1990
Production Company
Mark C Grech
Distribution Company
Warner Bros. Pictures International (WBI)
Location
New York City, New York, USA; San Francisco, California, USA; Los Angeles, California, USA; Hawaii, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 42m

Synopsis

Convinced that he's dying, a man agrees to jump into a volcano to save an island from an angry god.

Crew

Donovan Ahuna

Craft Service

Carl Aldana

Production

David Amborn

Special Effects

Stan Amborn

Special Effects Foreman

James M Anderson

Photography

Win Anderson

Costumes

Sarah James Arbeid

Other

John Ashby

Stunts

Carl Assmus

Other

Colleen Atwood

Costumes

Summer Banner

Script Supervisor

Ted Barba

Stunts

Jorge Ben

Song

Lon Bentley

Makeup

Tom Bertino

Animation Supervisor

Catherine Best

Assistant Editor

Stanley Bogest

Production Accountant

Jeff Bornstein

Stunts

Ian Bryce

Unit Production Manager

Stan Burden

Transportation Supervisor

Eric Burdon

Song Performer

Red Burke

Lighting Technician

John Cade

Stunts

Anne Calanchini

Effects Coordinator

Frank Campanella

Other

Cheryl Carasik

Set Decorator

Ralph Carpenter

Stunts

Dave Carson

Visual Effects Supervisor

Jo Carson

Photography

Lyle Carter

Hair

Andrew Casey

Assistant Camera Operator

Catherine Cederquist

Other

Lanny Cermak

Camera Equipment

Eric Chambers

Stunts

Ray Charles

Song Performer

Bob Chase

Costume Supervisor

Phil Chong

Stunts

Terry Chostner

Camera Operator

Rudy Clark

Song

Charlie Clavadetscher

Camera

Clarke Coleman

Stunts

Steve Collins

Transportation Coordinator

Elise Couvillion

Camera Assistant

Paulette Crammond

Makeup

Allegra Curtis

Costumes

Gordon Davidson

Dialogue Editor

Gordon Davidson

Dialogue Editor

Tom Davidson

Stunts

Brian Davis

Stunts

Yvonne Davis

Assistant Director

Ray De La Motte

Camera Operator

Georges Delerue

Music

Georges Delerue

Song

Berny Demolski

Other

Bill Derham

Property Master Assistant

Ed Desisso

Assistant Director

Angelo Digiacomo

Assistant Camera Operator

Greg Dillon

Dialogue Editor

Edward Dodds

Unit Production Manager

R Scott Doran

Swing Gang

Marion Dougherty

Casting Director

Dick Dova

Key Grip

Chris Doyle

Stunts

Richard Drake

On-Set Dresser

Tom Duffield

Art Director

Robert Dunn

Animal Trainer

Alan Edmisten

Assistant Director

Patricia Eiben

Costumes

Joaquin Elizalde

Sound Editor

John Elizalde

Sound Effects Editor

William M Elvin

Assistant Director

Leonard Engelman

Makeup

William Erickson

Stunt Coordinator

Dan Falkengren

Dolly Grip

Chris Silver Finigan

Production Accountant

Robert Finley Iii

Gaffer

Rolf Fleischmann

Effects Assistant

Ron Fode

Negative Cutting

Jim Fredburg

Special Effects

Jack Gallagher

Production Assistant

Susan Germaine

Hair

Brian Gernand

Visual Effects

Ray Gilberti

Camera Operator

Sandra Gimpel

Stunts

Mark Ginther

Stunts

Stephen Goldblatt

Director Of Photography

Stephen Goldblatt

Dp/Cinematographer

Roberto Gonzalez-rubio

Production Assistant

John Goodson

Visual Effects

Peter Gordon

Music

Peter Gordon

Music Arranger

Ned Gorman

Effects Coordinator

Mark C Grech

Cable Operator

Johnny Green

Song

Timothy J Griffith

Lighting Technician

Jeff Haas

Boom Operator

Lee Haas

Unit Production Manager

Joanne Hafner

Rotoscope Animator

Colleen Halsey

Assistant Editor

Richard Halsey

Editor

Oscar Hammerstein Ii

Theme Lyrics

Emil Clayton Hampton

Assistant Camera Operator

Tom Hanks

Song Performer

Anne Harmon

Artistic Advisor

Lorenz Hart

Song

Angela Heald

Other

Janet Healy

Visual Effects

Rick Heinrichs

Set Designer

David Heron

Visual Effects

Phil Heron

Other

Kurt Hessler

Production Assistant

Edward Heyman

Song

Owens Hills

Casting Associate

Ed Hirsh

Project Manager

Nancy Hopton

Script Supervisor

Tony Hudson

Visual Effects

Peg Hunter

Other

David P I James

Production Assistant

Rod Janusch

Other

Greg Jensen

Special Effects

Jeff Jensen

Stunts

Harly Jessup

Art Director

Albert Jeyte

Makeup

John C Johnson

Production

Brett Jones

Stunts

Carol Kane

Other

Jamie Kehoe

Craft Service

Kathleen Kennedy

Executive Producer

Jerome Kern

Song

Grace Kerr

Other

David Kirk

Special Effects

Oliver Konia

Other

Brad Kuen

Photography

Lynn Kuwahara

Location Manager

Ron Lambert

Color Timer

Sheri Lee

Makeup

Jerry Leeds

Assistant Director

Alan Jay Lerner

Song

Ellis Lierow

Hair

James Lim

Camera Operator

Gary Littlejohn

Stunts

Frederick Loewe

Song

Keith London

Visual Effects

Richard Lopez

Special Effects

Barbara Lorenz

Hair

Fred Lucky

Production

Jeffrey C Machit

Special Effects

Carl Mahakian

Foley Editor

Dennis Maitland

Sound Mixer

David Manhan

Swing Gang

Kim Marks

Camera Operator

Frank Marshall

Executive Producer

Pat Marshall

Rigging Gaffer

Solly Marx

Stunts

Molly M. Mayeux

Production Assistant

Richard F Mays

Set Designer

Patrick Mcardle

Camera Assistant

George Mcdowell

Location Manager

Frank Mceldowney

Other

Gearey Mcleod

Assistant Camera Operator

Donald O Mitchell

Sound

Dave Moon

Scenic Artist

Sue Moore

Costume Supervisor

James C Morance

Stunts

Patrick T Myers

Camera

Nick Navarro

Set Designer

Hal Nelson

Dolly Grip

Lori J Nelson

Other

Walter J Nichols

Lighting Technician

Dan O'connell

Foley Artist

Buck O'hare

Other

Jane O'neal

Photography

Mike Ohta

Other

Michael Olague

Other

Isamu Oshiro

Other

Lucille Ouyang

Assistant Director

Lauren Palmer

Adr Editor

Gary Parker

Sound

Tally Paulos

Adr Editor

Alan Peterson

Visual Effects

Jerry Pirozzi

Sound Editor

Elvis Presley

Song Performer

Maya Pruett

Makeup

C E Quick

Song

Daniel C Quick

Transportation Captain

J Suzanne Rampe

Stunts

Richard Ratliff

Special Effects

Charles Renfoe

Transportation Co-Captain

Arthur Resnick

Song

Jason Roberts

Production Assistant

Richard Rodgers

Song

John Rodrigues

Transportation Captain

Roxanne Rogers

Associate Producer

Richard C Rose

Key Grip

Tom Rosseter

Other

Greg P. Russell

Sound

Chris Salano

Assistant Camera Operator

Charlie Saldana

Key Grip

Tim Salmon

Boom Operator

Ben Salomone

Transportation Captain

Film Details

Also Known As
Joe Against the Volcano, Joe contra el Volcán, Joe contre le volcan, Joe och vulkanen, Joe vs. the Volcano
MPAA Rating
Genre
Comedy
Adventure
Fantasy
Romantic Comedy
Release Date
1990
Production Company
Mark C Grech
Distribution Company
Warner Bros. Pictures International (WBI)
Location
New York City, New York, USA; San Francisco, California, USA; Los Angeles, California, USA; Hawaii, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 42m

Articles

Ossie Davis (1917-2005)


Ossie Davis, the distinguished African-American character actor, director and civil rights activist, died of natural causes on February 4 in Miami Beach, where he was filming a movie. He was 87.

He was born Raiford Chatman Davis on December 18, 1917 in Cogdell, Georgia. His parents called him "R.C." When his mother registered his birth, the county clerk misunderstood her and thought she said "Ossie" instead of "R.C.," and the name stuck. He graduated high school in 1936 and was offered two scholarships: one to Savannah State College in Georgia and the other to the famed Tuskegee Institute in Alabama, but he could not afford the tuition and turned them down. He eventually saved enough money to hitchhike to Washington, D.C., where he lived with relatives while attending Howard University and studied drama.

As much as he enjoyed studying dramatics, Davis had a hunger to practice the trade professionally and in 1939, he left Howard University and headed to Harlem to work in the Rose McClendon Players, a highly respected, all-black theater ensemble in its day.

Davis' good looks and deep voice were impressive from the beginning, and he quickly joined the company and remained for three years. With the onset of World War II, Davis spent nearly four years in service, mainly as a surgical technician in an all-black Army hospital in Liberia, serving both wounded troops and local inhabitants before being transferred to Special Services to write and produce stage shows for the troops.

Back in New York in 1946, Davis debuted on Broadway in Jeb, a play about a returning black soldier who runs afoul of the Ku Klux Klan in the deep south. His co-star was Ruby Dee, an attractive leading lady who was one of the leading lights of black theater and film. Their initial romance soon developed into a lasting bond, and the two were married on December 9, 1948.

With Hollywood making much more socially conscious, adult films, particularly those that tackled themes of race (Lonely Are The Brave, Pinky, Lost Boundaries all 1949), it wasn't long before Hollywood came calling for Davis. His first film, with which he co-starred with his wife Dee, was a tense Joseph L. Mankiewicz's prison drama with strong racial overtones No Way Out (1950). He followed that up with a role as a cab driver in Henry Hathaway's Fourteen Hours (1951). Yet for the most part, Davis and Dee were primarily stage actors, and made few film appearances throughout the decade.

However, in should be noted that much of Davis time in the '50s was spent in social causes. Among them, a vocal protest against the execution of Julius and Ethel Rosenberg, and an alignment with singer and black activist Paul Robeson. Davis remained loyal to Robeson even after he was denounced by other black political, sports and show business figures for his openly communist and pro-Soviet sympathies. Such affiliation led them to suspicions in the anti-Communist witch hunts of the early '50s, but Davis, nor his wife Dee, were never openly accused of any wrongdoing.

If there was ever a decade that Ossie Davis was destined for greatness, it was undoubtly the '60s. He began with a hit Broadway show, A Raisin in the Sun in 1960, and followed that up a year later with his debut as a playwright - the satire, Purlie Victorious. In it, Davis starred as Purlie, a roustabout preacher who returns to southern Georgia with a plan to buy his former master's plantation barn and turn it into a racially integrated church.

Although not an initial success, the play would be adapted into a Tony-award winning musical, Purlie years later. Yet just as important as his stage success, was the fact that Davis' film roles became much more rich and varied: a liberal priest in John Huston's The Cardinal (1963); an unflinching tough performance as a black soldier who won't break against a sadistic sergeant's racial taunts in Sidney Lumet's searing war drama The Hill (1965); and a shrewd, evil butler who turns the tables on his employer in Rod Serling's Night Gallery (1969).

In 1970, he tried his hand at film directing, and scored a hit with Cotton Comes to Harlem (1970), a sharp urban action comedy with Godfrey Cambridge and Raymond St. Jacques as two black cops trying to stop a con artist from stealing Harlem's poor. It's generally considered the first major crossover film for the black market that was a hit with white audiences. Elsewhere, he found roles in some popular television mini-series such as King, and Roots: The Next Generation (both 1978), but for the most part, was committed to the theater.

Happily, along came Spike Lee, who revived his film career when he cast him in School Daze (1988). Davis followed that up with two more Lee films: Do the Right Thing (1989), and Jungle Fever (1991), which also co-starred his wife Dee. From there, Davis found himself in demand for senior character parts in many films throughtout the '90s: Grumpy Old Men (1993), The Client (1994), I'm Not Rappaport (1996), and HBO's remake of 12 Angry Men (1997).

Davis and Dee celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary in 1998 with the publication of a dual autobiography, In This Life Together, and in 2004, they were among the artists selected to receive the Kennedy Center Honors. Davis had been in Miami filming an independent movie called Retirement with co-stars George Segal, Rip Torn and Peter Falk.

In addition to his widow Dee, Davis is survived by three children, Nora Day, Hasna Muhammad and Guy Davis; and seven grandchildren.

by Michael T. Toole
Ossie Davis (1917-2005)

Ossie Davis (1917-2005)

Ossie Davis, the distinguished African-American character actor, director and civil rights activist, died of natural causes on February 4 in Miami Beach, where he was filming a movie. He was 87. He was born Raiford Chatman Davis on December 18, 1917 in Cogdell, Georgia. His parents called him "R.C." When his mother registered his birth, the county clerk misunderstood her and thought she said "Ossie" instead of "R.C.," and the name stuck. He graduated high school in 1936 and was offered two scholarships: one to Savannah State College in Georgia and the other to the famed Tuskegee Institute in Alabama, but he could not afford the tuition and turned them down. He eventually saved enough money to hitchhike to Washington, D.C., where he lived with relatives while attending Howard University and studied drama. As much as he enjoyed studying dramatics, Davis had a hunger to practice the trade professionally and in 1939, he left Howard University and headed to Harlem to work in the Rose McClendon Players, a highly respected, all-black theater ensemble in its day. Davis' good looks and deep voice were impressive from the beginning, and he quickly joined the company and remained for three years. With the onset of World War II, Davis spent nearly four years in service, mainly as a surgical technician in an all-black Army hospital in Liberia, serving both wounded troops and local inhabitants before being transferred to Special Services to write and produce stage shows for the troops. Back in New York in 1946, Davis debuted on Broadway in Jeb, a play about a returning black soldier who runs afoul of the Ku Klux Klan in the deep south. His co-star was Ruby Dee, an attractive leading lady who was one of the leading lights of black theater and film. Their initial romance soon developed into a lasting bond, and the two were married on December 9, 1948. With Hollywood making much more socially conscious, adult films, particularly those that tackled themes of race (Lonely Are The Brave, Pinky, Lost Boundaries all 1949), it wasn't long before Hollywood came calling for Davis. His first film, with which he co-starred with his wife Dee, was a tense Joseph L. Mankiewicz's prison drama with strong racial overtones No Way Out (1950). He followed that up with a role as a cab driver in Henry Hathaway's Fourteen Hours (1951). Yet for the most part, Davis and Dee were primarily stage actors, and made few film appearances throughout the decade. However, in should be noted that much of Davis time in the '50s was spent in social causes. Among them, a vocal protest against the execution of Julius and Ethel Rosenberg, and an alignment with singer and black activist Paul Robeson. Davis remained loyal to Robeson even after he was denounced by other black political, sports and show business figures for his openly communist and pro-Soviet sympathies. Such affiliation led them to suspicions in the anti-Communist witch hunts of the early '50s, but Davis, nor his wife Dee, were never openly accused of any wrongdoing. If there was ever a decade that Ossie Davis was destined for greatness, it was undoubtly the '60s. He began with a hit Broadway show, A Raisin in the Sun in 1960, and followed that up a year later with his debut as a playwright - the satire, Purlie Victorious. In it, Davis starred as Purlie, a roustabout preacher who returns to southern Georgia with a plan to buy his former master's plantation barn and turn it into a racially integrated church. Although not an initial success, the play would be adapted into a Tony-award winning musical, Purlie years later. Yet just as important as his stage success, was the fact that Davis' film roles became much more rich and varied: a liberal priest in John Huston's The Cardinal (1963); an unflinching tough performance as a black soldier who won't break against a sadistic sergeant's racial taunts in Sidney Lumet's searing war drama The Hill (1965); and a shrewd, evil butler who turns the tables on his employer in Rod Serling's Night Gallery (1969). In 1970, he tried his hand at film directing, and scored a hit with Cotton Comes to Harlem (1970), a sharp urban action comedy with Godfrey Cambridge and Raymond St. Jacques as two black cops trying to stop a con artist from stealing Harlem's poor. It's generally considered the first major crossover film for the black market that was a hit with white audiences. Elsewhere, he found roles in some popular television mini-series such as King, and Roots: The Next Generation (both 1978), but for the most part, was committed to the theater. Happily, along came Spike Lee, who revived his film career when he cast him in School Daze (1988). Davis followed that up with two more Lee films: Do the Right Thing (1989), and Jungle Fever (1991), which also co-starred his wife Dee. From there, Davis found himself in demand for senior character parts in many films throughtout the '90s: Grumpy Old Men (1993), The Client (1994), I'm Not Rappaport (1996), and HBO's remake of 12 Angry Men (1997). Davis and Dee celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary in 1998 with the publication of a dual autobiography, In This Life Together, and in 2004, they were among the artists selected to receive the Kennedy Center Honors. Davis had been in Miami filming an independent movie called Retirement with co-stars George Segal, Rip Torn and Peter Falk. In addition to his widow Dee, Davis is survived by three children, Nora Day, Hasna Muhammad and Guy Davis; and seven grandchildren. by Michael T. Toole

Robert Stack, 1919-2003


Robert Stack, the tough, forceful actor who had a solid career in films before achieving his greatest success playing crime fighter Eliot Ness in the '60s television series The Untouchables (1959-63) and later as host of the long-running Unsolved Mysteries(1987-2002), died on May 14 of heart failure in his Los Angeles home. He was 84.

Stack was born in Los Angeles on January 13, 1919 to a well-to-do family but his parents divorced when he was a year old. At age three, he moved with his mother to Paris, where she studied singing. They returned to Los Angeles when he was seven, by then French was his native language and was not taught English until he started schooling.

Naturally athletic, Stack was still in high school when he became a national skeet-shooting champion and top-flight polo player. He soon was giving lessons on shooting to such top Hollywood luminaries as Clark Gable and Carol Lombard, and found himself on the polo field with some notable movie moguls like Darryl Zanuck and Walter Wanger.

Stack enrolled in the University of Southern California, where he took some drama courses, and was on the Polo team, but it wasn't long before some influential people in the film industry took notice of his classic good looks, and lithe physique. Soon, his Hollywood connections got him on a film set at Paramount, a screen test, and eventually, his first lead in a picture, opposite Deanna Durbin in First Love (1939). Although he was only 20, Stack's natural delivery and boyish charm made him a natural for the screen.

His range grew with some meatier parts in the next few years, especially noteworthy were his roles as the young Nazi sympathizer in Frank Borzage's chilling The Mortal Storm (1940), with James Stewart, and as the Polish flier who woos a married Carole Lombard in Ernst Lubitsch's To Be or Not to Be (1942).

After serving as a gunnery officer in the Navy during World War II, Stack returned to the screen, and found a few interesting roles over the next ten years: giving Elizabeth Taylor her first screen kiss in Robert Thorp's A Date With Judy (1948); the leading role as an American bullfighter in Budd Boetticher's The Bullfighter and the Lady (1951); and as a pilot in William Wellman's The High and the Mighty (1954), starring John Wayne. However, Stack saved his best dramatic performances for Douglas Sirk in two knockout films: as a self-destructive alcoholic in Douglas Sirk's Written on the Wind (1956), for which he received an Academy Award nomination for supporting actor; and sympathetically portraying a fallen World War I pilot ace who is forced to do barnstorming stunts for mere survival in Tarnished Angels (1958).

Despite proving his capabilities as a solid actor in these roles, front rank stardom oddly eluded Stack at this point. That all changed when Stack gave television a try. The result was the enormously popular series, The Untouchables (1959-63). This exciting crime show about the real-life Prohibition-era crime-fighter Eliot Ness and his G-men taking on the Chicago underworld was successful in its day for several reasons: its catchy theme music, florid violence (which caused quite a sensation in its day), taut narration by Walter Winchell, and of course, Stack's trademark staccato delivery and strong presence. It all proved so popular that the series ran for four years, earned an Emmy for Stack in 1960, and made him a household name.

Stack would return to television in the late '60s, with the The Name of the Game (1968-71), and a string of made-for-television movies throughout the '70s. His career perked up again when Steven Spielberg cast him in his big budget comedy 1941 (1979) as General Joe Stillwell. The film surprised many viewers as few realized Stack was willing to spoof his granite-faced stoicism, but it won him over many new fans, and his dead-pan intensity would be used to perfect comic effect the following year as Captain Rex Kramer (who can forget the sight of him beating up Hare Krishnas at the airport?) in David and Jerry Zucker's wonderful spoof of disaster flicks, Airplane! (1980).

Stack's activity would be sporadic throughout the remainder of his career, but he returned to television, as the host of enormously popular Unsolved Mysteries (1987-2002), and played himself in Lawrence Kasden's comedy-drama Mumford (1999). He is survived by his wife of 47 years, Rosemarie Bowe Stack, a former actress, and two children, Elizabeth and Charles, both of Los Angeles.

by Michael T. Toole

Robert Stack, 1919-2003

Robert Stack, the tough, forceful actor who had a solid career in films before achieving his greatest success playing crime fighter Eliot Ness in the '60s television series The Untouchables (1959-63) and later as host of the long-running Unsolved Mysteries(1987-2002), died on May 14 of heart failure in his Los Angeles home. He was 84. Stack was born in Los Angeles on January 13, 1919 to a well-to-do family but his parents divorced when he was a year old. At age three, he moved with his mother to Paris, where she studied singing. They returned to Los Angeles when he was seven, by then French was his native language and was not taught English until he started schooling. Naturally athletic, Stack was still in high school when he became a national skeet-shooting champion and top-flight polo player. He soon was giving lessons on shooting to such top Hollywood luminaries as Clark Gable and Carol Lombard, and found himself on the polo field with some notable movie moguls like Darryl Zanuck and Walter Wanger. Stack enrolled in the University of Southern California, where he took some drama courses, and was on the Polo team, but it wasn't long before some influential people in the film industry took notice of his classic good looks, and lithe physique. Soon, his Hollywood connections got him on a film set at Paramount, a screen test, and eventually, his first lead in a picture, opposite Deanna Durbin in First Love (1939). Although he was only 20, Stack's natural delivery and boyish charm made him a natural for the screen. His range grew with some meatier parts in the next few years, especially noteworthy were his roles as the young Nazi sympathizer in Frank Borzage's chilling The Mortal Storm (1940), with James Stewart, and as the Polish flier who woos a married Carole Lombard in Ernst Lubitsch's To Be or Not to Be (1942). After serving as a gunnery officer in the Navy during World War II, Stack returned to the screen, and found a few interesting roles over the next ten years: giving Elizabeth Taylor her first screen kiss in Robert Thorp's A Date With Judy (1948); the leading role as an American bullfighter in Budd Boetticher's The Bullfighter and the Lady (1951); and as a pilot in William Wellman's The High and the Mighty (1954), starring John Wayne. However, Stack saved his best dramatic performances for Douglas Sirk in two knockout films: as a self-destructive alcoholic in Douglas Sirk's Written on the Wind (1956), for which he received an Academy Award nomination for supporting actor; and sympathetically portraying a fallen World War I pilot ace who is forced to do barnstorming stunts for mere survival in Tarnished Angels (1958). Despite proving his capabilities as a solid actor in these roles, front rank stardom oddly eluded Stack at this point. That all changed when Stack gave television a try. The result was the enormously popular series, The Untouchables (1959-63). This exciting crime show about the real-life Prohibition-era crime-fighter Eliot Ness and his G-men taking on the Chicago underworld was successful in its day for several reasons: its catchy theme music, florid violence (which caused quite a sensation in its day), taut narration by Walter Winchell, and of course, Stack's trademark staccato delivery and strong presence. It all proved so popular that the series ran for four years, earned an Emmy for Stack in 1960, and made him a household name. Stack would return to television in the late '60s, with the The Name of the Game (1968-71), and a string of made-for-television movies throughout the '70s. His career perked up again when Steven Spielberg cast him in his big budget comedy 1941 (1979) as General Joe Stillwell. The film surprised many viewers as few realized Stack was willing to spoof his granite-faced stoicism, but it won him over many new fans, and his dead-pan intensity would be used to perfect comic effect the following year as Captain Rex Kramer (who can forget the sight of him beating up Hare Krishnas at the airport?) in David and Jerry Zucker's wonderful spoof of disaster flicks, Airplane! (1980). Stack's activity would be sporadic throughout the remainder of his career, but he returned to television, as the host of enormously popular Unsolved Mysteries (1987-2002), and played himself in Lawrence Kasden's comedy-drama Mumford (1999). He is survived by his wife of 47 years, Rosemarie Bowe Stack, a former actress, and two children, Elizabeth and Charles, both of Los Angeles. by Michael T. Toole

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States on Video August 15, 1990

Released in United States Spring March 9, 1990

Directorial debut for playwright and screenwriter John Patrick Shanley.

Began shooting June 8, 1989.

Completed shooting September 19, 1989.

Released in United States Spring March 9, 1990

Released in United States on Video August 15, 1990