Jewel of the Nile


1h 45m 1985

Brief Synopsis

An adventurer comes to the aid of a romance novelist kidnapped by an Arab potentate.

Film Details

Also Known As
Den vilda jakten på juvelen
MPAA Rating
PG
Genre
Adventure
Action
Comedy
Romance
Sequel
Release Date
1985
Distribution Company
20th Century Fox Distribution
Location
Mexico; Morocco; La Victorine Studio Nice, France

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 45m

Synopsis

Six months after their first adventure Joan Wilder takes an assignment to do a biography on an evil desert ruler, eventually finds herself in hot water over a precious jewel, and Jack Colton comes to the rescue.

Crew

Marjan Abdelkouder

Production Assistant

Edward M. Abroms

Editing

Nick Allder

Special Effects Supervisor

Ramon Arizaverreta

Stunts

Peter Arnold

Transportation

Jean-yves Asselin

Location Manager

John Astrop

Song

Charles Balazs

Makeup

Norm Barons

Electrician

William Bernie

Construction

Kathryn Blondell

Hair

Marcus Blunder

Camera

Peter Boita

Editor

Paul Botham

Boom Operator

Tahar Boualam

Generator Operator

Jocelyn Boumester

Art Assistant

Wayne Braithwaite

Song

Ren Bream

Other

Teresa Somogyi Brett

Production

Terry Britten

Song

Jack Brodsky

Coproducer

Robin Browne

Special Effects

Terry Busby

Sound Editor

Jonathan Butler

Song

Jonathan Butler

Song Performer

Roy Cannon

Props

Ray Caple

Matte Painter

Francisco Carmona

Stunts

Tom Case

Makeup

Terry Chapman

Key Grip

Diane Cheek

Assistant

Alan Choux

Props

Nobby Clark

Other

Ken Clarke

Other

Bryan Coates

Location Manager

Christopher Cook

Assistant Editor

Annie Copini

Makeup

Dee Corcoran

Hair

Seamus Corcoran

Camera Operator

Derek Creedon

Dresser

Derek Creedon

Props

Richard Daniel

Sound

Mike Dasserville

Other

Mitch Dasserville

Other

Richard Dawking

Production Designer

Jan De Bont

Dp/Cinematographer

Jan De Bont

Director Of Photography

Vince Deadrick

Stunts

Peter Debont

Camera Assistant

Peter Depalma

Assistant

Anastasio Diaz

Wrangler

Ernesto Diaz

Wrangler

Abdessamad Dinia

Location Manager

Joel Douglas

Coproducer

Michael Douglas

Producer

Eric Dussart

Location Manager

Barry J Eastmond

Song

Michael Ellis

Editor

Chuck Enzen

Production

Chuck Enzen

Other

Renee Featherstone

Production

Morna Ferguson

Makeup

Michael Ferri

Assistant Director

David Fitzgerald

Assistant Camera Operator

Cyril Fitzwater

Carpenter

John Fletcher

Special Effects

Larry Fowles

Other

Laurie Fowles

Other

Jim Franklyn

Production Accountant

Larry Freeman

Best Boy

Augusto Funari

Stunts

Len Furey

Construction Coordinator

Juan Garcia

Wrangler

Andy Gerbl

Camera Assistant

Giovanni Gianfriglia

Stunts

Ray Gibbs

Wardrobe

Billy Goodson

Choreographer

Robin Grathwol

Stunts

Nigel Green

Song

Rachel Griffiths

Script Supervisor

Fred Gunning

Carpenter

Andrew Hall

Other

Laurie Hanley

Other

Pete Q Harris

Song

Ahmed Hatimi

Assistant Director

Ron Hersey

Assistant Camera Operator

Robert Hill

Props

Leslie Hodgson

Adr Editor

Michael Hoenig

Music Producer

Geoff Howery

Best Boy

Bobby Huber

Dolly Grip

Raymond Hughes

Costume Designer

Ron Hughes

Other

Gerry Humphreys

Sound

Jalil Hutchins

Song

Mike Jarvis

Wardrobe

Chip Johnson

Assistant

Michael Joyce

Unit Production Manager

Laura Julian

Production Coordinator

Yumi Katsura

Other

Derek Kavanagh

Production Manager

Gordon Kee

Production Associate

Chris Kelly

Sound Editor

Mary Jane Nolan Kelly

Production

George King

Best Boy

John King

Camera

Terry Knight

Production Designer

Philip Knowles

Special Effects Coordinator

Kerry Kohler

Sound Editor

Mark Konincyx

Camera Operator

Mark Konincyx

Steadicam Operator

Lawrence Konner

Screenplay

Jason Krasucki

Assistant Editor

Damien Lanfranchi

Art Director

Robert John Lange

Music Producer

Robert John Lange

Song

Jean Marie Lopez

Best Boy

Kiki Lopez

Assistant Director

Graham Lyle

Song

Phil Macdonald

Props Assistant

Jonathan Mackinstry

Other

Sandy Macrae

Sound

Hugh Masekela

Song Performer

Hugh Masekela

Song

Graham Mathews

Other

Simon May

Song

Bernard Mazauric

Unit Production Manager

Caroline Mazauric

Casting

Steven C. Mcgee

Electrician

John Mcgoldrick

Special Effects

John Mcgurrell

Camera

Dennis Mctaggart

Assistant Editor

Riccardo Mioni

Stunts

Sergio Mioni

Stunts

Sergio Mioni

Stunt Coordinator

Stefano Mioni

Stunts

Bruce Moriarty

Assistant Director

Ian Morten

Sound

David Murphy

Costume Supervisor

Simon Murray

Costumes

David J Negron

Production

Bryan New

Song

Tiny Nicholls

Wardrobe Supervisor

Jack Nitzsche

Music

Roy O'connor

Dresser

Roy O'connor

Props

Robin O'donoghue

Sound

Billy Ocean

Song Performer

Billy Ocean

Song

Joe Ochoa

Assistant Director

Tony Ochoa

Assistant Director

Rich Osborne

Assistant Camera Operator

Claudio Pacifico

Stunts

Bill Parnell

Sound Editor

Bob Penn

Photography

Andre Petit

Generator Operator

Hassen Pigani

Stunts

Alan Poole

Special Effects

Emma Porteous

Costume Designer

Edith Poussou

Costumes

Bobby Race

Dolly Grip

Bobby Race

Best Boy

Katy Radford

Production

Orlando Ragusa

Stunts

Glenn Randall

Stunt Coordinator

Melinda Reese

Script Supervisor

Patricia Reid

Assistant

Fred Reynolds

Other

Tony Rimmington

Other

John Roberts

Other

John Rogers

Other

Timoteo Nevado Roman

Wrangler

Mark D. Rosenthal

Screenplay

Nina Saxon

Titles

Terry Schubert

Effects Coordinator

Steve Short

Props

Mark Shreeve

Song

Mark Shreeve

Song Performer

Peter J Silbermann

Other

Larry K Smith

Song

Richard Jon Smith

Song

Carmen Soriano

Production Coordinator

Peter Spencer

Props

Peter Spencer

Dresser

Jean Luc St Baptiste

Hair

Gary Tandrow

Gaffer

James Taylor

Transportation

Diane Thomas

Characters As Source Material

Tony Tieger

Props

Rose Tobias-shaw

Casting

Leslie Tomkins

Art Director

Charles Torbett

Property Master

Joe Turner

Production

Ruby Turner

Song Performer

Eric Van Empel

Camera Assistant

Richard Vercade

Generator Operator

Simon Wakefield

Set Decorator

Robbie Weischart

Key Grip

Richard Whitfield

Music Editor

Robert Wiesmann

Camera Assistant

Film Details

Also Known As
Den vilda jakten på juvelen
MPAA Rating
PG
Genre
Adventure
Action
Comedy
Romance
Sequel
Release Date
1985
Distribution Company
20th Century Fox Distribution
Location
Mexico; Morocco; La Victorine Studio Nice, France

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 45m

Articles

The Jewel of the Nile


In The Jewel of the Nile ,the 1985 sequel to the Robert Zemeckis-directed romantic adventure Romancing the Stone (1984), Kathleen Turner and Michael Douglas reunite as the alternately adversarial and amorous team of swashbuckling adventurer Jack Colton and uptight romance writer Joan Wilder.

The film opens with a scene aboard a pirate ship, an overheated fantasy lit in an otherworldly red, drawn from Wilder's latest romance. But back in reality, Wilder is suffering from a major bout of writer's block on Colton's sailboat docked on the Riviera. Though she has promised to accompany Colton as he sails around the world, Wilder is distracted by the resplendent scenery and life of leisure. Living out a real romantic fantasy, ironically enough, appears to impede her ability to spin romantic fiction.

On dry land for a book event, Wilder tells her skeptical publisher Gloria (Holland Taylor) about her difficulty writing, "romance just doesn't seem real to me anymore." But at the party, Wilder meets the man she imagines is going to change her luck. Anxious to become the emperor of a strife-torn African country called Kadir (a fictional place), Omar (Spiros Focas) is convinced that Wilder is the writer to tell his story and pave the way to his political destiny. He convinces Wilder to leave Colton and fly with him to Kadir where he hopes Wilder's penmanship and possession of the famed "Jewel of the Nile" will help him rule the land.

Meanwhile Colton has reunited with Ralph (Danny DeVito), his surly nemesis from Romancing the Stone, and a revolutionary opponent of Omar's reign Tarak (Paul David Magid) who leads a raucous group of Sufis on horseback bopping along to their boom boxes. Tarak convinces the men with their help they can recover the Jewel of the Nile and remove Omar from power. Thus ensues a maelstrom of action and adventure as Wilder finally learns of Omar's ill-intent and escapes his clutches with Colton's help.

An odd mix of both Arab stereotypes and conventional film typecasting, The Jewel of the Nile characterizes its Arabs as anonymous villains and rebels barely distinguished by their names Tarak, Barak, Karak, Arak and Sarak in the tradition of the Indiana Jones cycle that inspired it. As Vincent Canby noted in The New York Times of the film's casual racism expressed by the obnoxious Ralph, "'Why do these Third World cesspools always have to be so hot?'' Canby was not the only critic to call the film out for its prejudices. As a TV Guide reviewer noted, "it's hard to overlook the racist depiction of Arabs, which is markedly less jovial than the stereotypical treatment of Latinos in the first film."

Strangely enough, part of the way the film vilifies Omar and his henchmen is by linking the Arabs to Nazi imagery. In the climax where Omar attempts to sway his citizens to make him their prophet-ruler the film borrows, oddly enough, from the vocabulary of Nuremberg with its eagles and banners and militaristic spectacle.

A $21 million production, The Jewel of the Nile reportedly grossed almost as much as Romancing the Stone but fared less well in critical circles. In her New York Times review Janet Maslin wrote, "There are frequent, expensive-looking explosions, and the more elaborate sets include an entire Arab village (which is mostly demolished during the course of the story, as an airplane is driven through it) and an immense, Nazi-style backdrop against which a political rally unfolds. Far from generating excitement, this excess baggage merely signals conspicuous waste. It's never possible to enjoy the film without registering how much costly, unnecessary trouble went into getting it made."

Turner and Douglas were reportedly not happy about making a Romancing the Stone sequel, but were contractually bound to participate in a sequel. Twentieth Century Fox supposedly threatened to hit Turner with a multi-million dollar lawsuit if she backed out of the project, as first promised. But their presence lends the slightly absurd story its sole amusement and interest. As Roger Ebert noted in his review of the film, "their chemistry is sometimes more entertaining than the contrivances of the plot."

The Jewel of the Nile also suffered the unfortunate tragedy of a plane crash two weeks before filming began, which killed production designer Richard Dawking and production manager Brian Coates as well as everyone else on board the flight to Morocco, where most of the film was shot.

Another bit of trivia: This sequel to Romancing the Stone is famous for its top forty theme song performed by Billy Ocean, "When the Going gets Tough, The Tough Get Going."

Director: Lewis Teague
Producer: Michael Douglas
Screenplay: Mark Rosenthal and Lawrence Konner from characters created by Diane Thomas
Cinematography: Jan de Bont
Production Design: Richard Dawking, Terry Knight
Music: Jack Nitzsche
Cast: Kathleen Turner (Joan Wilder), Michael Douglas (Jack Colton), Danny DeVito (Ralph), Spiros Focas (Omar), Avner Eisenberg (Jewel), Paul David Magid (Tarak).
C-106m.

by Felicia Feaster
The Jewel Of The Nile

The Jewel of the Nile

In The Jewel of the Nile ,the 1985 sequel to the Robert Zemeckis-directed romantic adventure Romancing the Stone (1984), Kathleen Turner and Michael Douglas reunite as the alternately adversarial and amorous team of swashbuckling adventurer Jack Colton and uptight romance writer Joan Wilder. The film opens with a scene aboard a pirate ship, an overheated fantasy lit in an otherworldly red, drawn from Wilder's latest romance. But back in reality, Wilder is suffering from a major bout of writer's block on Colton's sailboat docked on the Riviera. Though she has promised to accompany Colton as he sails around the world, Wilder is distracted by the resplendent scenery and life of leisure. Living out a real romantic fantasy, ironically enough, appears to impede her ability to spin romantic fiction. On dry land for a book event, Wilder tells her skeptical publisher Gloria (Holland Taylor) about her difficulty writing, "romance just doesn't seem real to me anymore." But at the party, Wilder meets the man she imagines is going to change her luck. Anxious to become the emperor of a strife-torn African country called Kadir (a fictional place), Omar (Spiros Focas) is convinced that Wilder is the writer to tell his story and pave the way to his political destiny. He convinces Wilder to leave Colton and fly with him to Kadir where he hopes Wilder's penmanship and possession of the famed "Jewel of the Nile" will help him rule the land. Meanwhile Colton has reunited with Ralph (Danny DeVito), his surly nemesis from Romancing the Stone, and a revolutionary opponent of Omar's reign Tarak (Paul David Magid) who leads a raucous group of Sufis on horseback bopping along to their boom boxes. Tarak convinces the men with their help they can recover the Jewel of the Nile and remove Omar from power. Thus ensues a maelstrom of action and adventure as Wilder finally learns of Omar's ill-intent and escapes his clutches with Colton's help. An odd mix of both Arab stereotypes and conventional film typecasting, The Jewel of the Nile characterizes its Arabs as anonymous villains and rebels barely distinguished by their names Tarak, Barak, Karak, Arak and Sarak in the tradition of the Indiana Jones cycle that inspired it. As Vincent Canby noted in The New York Times of the film's casual racism expressed by the obnoxious Ralph, "'Why do these Third World cesspools always have to be so hot?'' Canby was not the only critic to call the film out for its prejudices. As a TV Guide reviewer noted, "it's hard to overlook the racist depiction of Arabs, which is markedly less jovial than the stereotypical treatment of Latinos in the first film." Strangely enough, part of the way the film vilifies Omar and his henchmen is by linking the Arabs to Nazi imagery. In the climax where Omar attempts to sway his citizens to make him their prophet-ruler the film borrows, oddly enough, from the vocabulary of Nuremberg with its eagles and banners and militaristic spectacle. A $21 million production, The Jewel of the Nile reportedly grossed almost as much as Romancing the Stone but fared less well in critical circles. In her New York Times review Janet Maslin wrote, "There are frequent, expensive-looking explosions, and the more elaborate sets include an entire Arab village (which is mostly demolished during the course of the story, as an airplane is driven through it) and an immense, Nazi-style backdrop against which a political rally unfolds. Far from generating excitement, this excess baggage merely signals conspicuous waste. It's never possible to enjoy the film without registering how much costly, unnecessary trouble went into getting it made." Turner and Douglas were reportedly not happy about making a Romancing the Stone sequel, but were contractually bound to participate in a sequel. Twentieth Century Fox supposedly threatened to hit Turner with a multi-million dollar lawsuit if she backed out of the project, as first promised. But their presence lends the slightly absurd story its sole amusement and interest. As Roger Ebert noted in his review of the film, "their chemistry is sometimes more entertaining than the contrivances of the plot." The Jewel of the Nile also suffered the unfortunate tragedy of a plane crash two weeks before filming began, which killed production designer Richard Dawking and production manager Brian Coates as well as everyone else on board the flight to Morocco, where most of the film was shot. Another bit of trivia: This sequel to Romancing the Stone is famous for its top forty theme song performed by Billy Ocean, "When the Going gets Tough, The Tough Get Going." Director: Lewis Teague Producer: Michael Douglas Screenplay: Mark Rosenthal and Lawrence Konner from characters created by Diane Thomas Cinematography: Jan de Bont Production Design: Richard Dawking, Terry Knight Music: Jack Nitzsche Cast: Kathleen Turner (Joan Wilder), Michael Douglas (Jack Colton), Danny DeVito (Ralph), Spiros Focas (Omar), Avner Eisenberg (Jewel), Paul David Magid (Tarak). C-106m. by Felicia Feaster

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Voted Best Actress (Turner) by the 1984 Los Angeles Film Critics Association.

Released in United States Winter December 11, 1985

Re-released in United States on Video February 6, 1996

Sequel to "Romancing the Stone" (1984).

Released in USA on video.

Began shooting April 22, 1985.

Re-released in United States on Video February 6, 1996 (Double Pack--Romancing the Stone)

Released in United States Winter December 11, 1985

Completed shooting July 25, 1985.

Completed shooting March 1983.

The film is dedicated to the memory of Richard Dawking, Bryan Coates, Richard Kotch and Diane Thomas.