Jet Attack


1h 8m 1958

Film Details

Also Known As
Jet Alert, Jet Command, Jet Fighter, Jet Squad
Release Date
Feb 1958
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Catalina Productions
Distribution Company
American International Pictures
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 8m

Synopsis

During the Korean War, the American Air Force conducts a crucial test of a long-distance radio transmitting and tracking device, designed by scientist Dean Olmstead. Olmstead's test is successful, but when the plane carrying Olmstead crosses into North Korea, its jet fighter escort is unable to prevent an attack by the North Koreans and Olmstead's bomber is shot down. Back at the air base, the leader of the jet fighters, Capt. Tom Arnett, reports to Col. Catlett, who laments Olmstead's loss, as the scientist left no documentation on his radio transmitter. Later that night, Lt. Bill Clairborn finds a drunken Tom and his flying partner, Lt. Sandy Wilkerson, at a local bar and takes them back to the base. There Catlett questions Tom about his friendship with Russian nurse Tanya Nikova. Tom explains that Tanya, a White Russian and protégé of famous Russian physician Col. Kuban, saved his life when he was shot down over Korea early in the war. Catlett then reveals that Army intelligence believes that Olmstead may have survived the crash and orders Tom and Bill to parachute into the enemy zone and contact Tanya to find out if Olmstead is alive. Tom and Bill depart immediately with radioman Chick Lane and upon landing, are attacked by North Korean forces until they are rescued by a South Korean guerrilla outfit led by Capt. Chon. Chon takes Tom and Bill to his hideout where Tom reunites with Tanya, who has been working as a spy for the guerrillas. Chon tells Tom that although Olmstead's plane was not completely destroyed in the crash, it was surrounded by North Koreans before the guerrillas could examine it. Tanya adds that if Olmstead suffered serious injuries, there would be a medical report at Col. Kuban's office. In a private moment, Tom and Tanya, who were romantically involved in the past, wonder if they will both survive the war to share a future together. Later, Tom rejects Bill's suspicion of Tanya's loyalties. The next day, after Tanya rummages through Col. Kuban's medical records she is questioned by Maj. Wan, a North Korean security chief. Tanya tells Tom that although there was no evidence in the records that Olmstead is in any of the camp hospitals, she will accompany Kuban on his rounds of the camps the following day to be sure. Bill believes Tanya is stalling in order that Olmstead can be relocated, but Tom discounts the idea. The following morning, while Tanya tours the area camp hospitals with Kuban, Tom and Bill secretly visit a prisoners' camp to ask if any new prisoners meeting Olmstead's description have arrived. When none are reported, Bill suggests they have fulfilled their mission and should return to their landing site for retrieval, but Tom insists they hear Tanya's results first. Meanwhile, at the next-to-the-last camp hospital on Kuban's rounds, Tanya and Kuban are puzzled by a patient segregated from the others. Upon inquiring, they learn that the patient is an older American survivor of a recent plane crash. Kuban examines the patient, unaware that the man is Olmstead. When Kuban decides to report back to Wan, Tanya, who has recognized the man as Olmstead, promises she will finish Kuban's rounds, but instead hastens to inform Tom. Bill continues to believe Tanya is setting a trap and demands they contact headquarters before taking further action. Tom locates Chick, who reports that the radio was damaged during the attack after the landing. Tom then decides to pose as a Russian officer and accompany Tanya to the camp hospital to rescue Olmstead. When Chon warns that Tom will be executed as a spy if caught, Bill reluctantly accompanies Chick and Chon to provide protection. At the Korean camp, Kuban reports to Wan, who grows suspicious that the three American paratroopers may have been a rescue party sent for Olmstead. Wan then reveals he has investigated Tanya and believes she may be a traitor. Skeptical, Kuban telephones the outlying hospital to search for Tanya but is dismayed when he is told she did not stop there as promised. Wan then orders a security unit to the camp hospital housing Olmstead. After Tanya gets Tom through hospital security by declaring that he is a specialist, once inside, she examines Olmstead and learns that he is suffering from a concussion but is otherwise well. Knowing that they cannot escape with the injured man, Tanya risks giving him an injection that simulates death. Meanwhile, Chon, Chick and the guerillas intercept Wan's forces and engage them in order to give Tanya, Tom and Olmstead time to escape. In the skirmish Chon and several guerrillas are killed, and Chick is captured and beaten for information. Back at the guerillas' hideout, Olmstead revives and recognizes Tom. Frustrated by Chick's defiant refusal to divulge information, Wan concludes that Olmstead and his rescuers will likely be picked up where they were dropped. Back at the American base, Sandy takes off in a rescue helicopter and upon arriving at the meeting point barely escapes an attack by Wan's men. After Tom, Bill and Olmstead arrive at the meeting site, Tom rescues Sandy, but Bill is killed. Tanya arrives in her car to help Tom escape, but is seriously wounded as they speed away. Tanya manages to drive the men to the nearby Russian airfield, but collapses shortly thereafter and dies. When Sandy spots two MIG Russian jets prepped for takeoff, he and Tom overpower the pilots and sieze their plane. As Wan and his unit arrive and begin firing, the American pilots take off, winging Olmstead to safety.

Film Details

Also Known As
Jet Alert, Jet Command, Jet Fighter, Jet Squad
Release Date
Feb 1958
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Catalina Productions
Distribution Company
American International Pictures
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 8m

Articles

TCM Remembers - John Agar


TCM REMEMBERS JOHN AGAR, 1921-2002

Popular b-movie actor John Agar died April 7th at the age of 81. Agar is probably best known as the actor that married Shirley Temple in 1945 but he also appeared alongside John Wayne in several films. Agar soon became a fixture in such films as Tarantula (1955) and The Mole People (1956) and was a cult favorite ever since, something he took in good spirits and seemed to enjoy. In 1972, for instance, the fan magazine Famous Monsters of Filmland mistakenly ran his obituary, a piece that Agar would later happily autograph.

Agar was born January 31, 1921 in Chicago. He had been a sergeant in the Army Air Corps working as a physical trainer when he was hired in 1945 to escort 16-year-old Shirley Temple to a Hollywood party. Agar apparently knew Temple earlier since his sister was a classmate of Temple's. Despite the objections of Temple's mother the two became a couple and were married shortly after. Temple's producer David Selznick asked Agar if he wanted to act but he reportedly replied that one actor in the family was enough. Nevertheless, Selznick paid for acting lessons and signed Agar to a contract.

Agar's first film was the John Ford-directed Fort Apache (1948) also starring Temple. Agar and Temple also both appeared in Adventure in Baltimore (1949) and had a daughter in 1948 but were divorced the following year. Agar married again in 1951 which lasted until his wife's death in 2000. Agar worked in a string of Westerns and war films such as Sands of Iwo Jima (1949), Breakthrough (1950) and She Wore a Yellow Ribbon (1949). Later when pressed for money he began making the films that would establish his reputation beyond the gossip columns: Revenge of the Creature (1955), The Brain from Planet Arous (1957), Invisible Invaders (1959) and the mind-boggling Zontar, the Thing from Venus (1966). The roles became progressively smaller so Agar sold insurance and real estate on the side. When he appeared in the 1988 film Miracle Mile his dialogue supposedly included obscenities which Agar had always refused to use. He showed the director a way to do the scene without that language and that's how it was filmed.

By Lang Thompson

DUDLEY MOORE, 1935-2002

Award-winning actor, comedian and musician Dudley Moore died on March 27th at the age of 66. Moore first gained notice in his native England for ground-breaking stage and TV comedy before later building a Hollywood career. Like many of his peers, he had an amiable, open appeal that was balanced against a sharply satiric edge. Moore could play the confused innocent as well as the crafty schemer and tended to command attention wherever he appeared. Among his four marriages were two actresses: Tuesday Weld and Suzy Kendall.

Moore was born April 19, 1935 in London. As a child, he had a club foot later corrected by years of surgery that often left him recuperating in the hospital alongside critically wounded soldiers. Moore attended Oxford where he earned a degree in musical composition and met future collaborators Peter Cook, Jonathan Miller and Alan Bennett. The four formed the landmark comedy ensemble Beyond the Fringe. Though often merely labelled as a precursor to Monty Python's Flying Circus, Beyond the Fringe was instrumental in the marriage of the piercing, highly educated sense of humor cultivated by Oxbridge graduates to the modern mass media. In this case it was the revue stage and television where Beyond the Fringe first assaulted the astonished minds of Britons. Moore supplied the music and such songs as "The Sadder and Wiser Beaver," "Man Bites God" and "One Leg Too Few." (You can pick up a CD set with much of the stage show. Unfortunately for future historians the BBC commonly erased tapes at this period - why? - so many of the TV episodes are apparently gone forever.)

Moore's first feature film was the 1966 farce The Wrong Box (a Robert Louis Stevenson adaptation) but it was his collaboration with Peter Cook on Bedazzled (1967) that's endured. Unlike its tepid 2000 remake, the original Bedazzled is a wolverine-tough satire of mid-60s culture that hasn't aged a bit: viewers are still as likely to be appalled and entertained at the same time. Moore not only co-wrote the story with Cook but composed the score. Moore appeared in a few more films until starring in 10 (1979). Written and directed by Blake Edwards, this amiable comedy featured Moore (a last-minute replacement for George Segal) caught in a middle-aged crisis and proved popular with both audiences and critics. Moore's career took another turn when his role as a wealthy alcoholic who falls for the proverbial shop girl in Arthur (1981) snagged him an Oscar nomination as Best Actor and a Golden Globe win.

However Moore was never able to build on these successes. He starred in a passable remake of Preston Sturges' Unfaithfully Yours (1984), did another Blake Edwards romantic comedy of moderate interest called Micki + Maude (1984, also a Golden Globe winner for Moore), a misfired sequel to Arthur in 1988 and a few other little-seen films. The highlight of this period must certainly be the 1991 series Orchestra where Moore spars with the wonderfully crusty conductor Georg Solti and leads an orchestra of students in what's certainly some of the most delightful television ever made.

By Lang Thompson

Tcm Remembers - John Agar

TCM Remembers - John Agar

TCM REMEMBERS JOHN AGAR, 1921-2002 Popular b-movie actor John Agar died April 7th at the age of 81. Agar is probably best known as the actor that married Shirley Temple in 1945 but he also appeared alongside John Wayne in several films. Agar soon became a fixture in such films as Tarantula (1955) and The Mole People (1956) and was a cult favorite ever since, something he took in good spirits and seemed to enjoy. In 1972, for instance, the fan magazine Famous Monsters of Filmland mistakenly ran his obituary, a piece that Agar would later happily autograph. Agar was born January 31, 1921 in Chicago. He had been a sergeant in the Army Air Corps working as a physical trainer when he was hired in 1945 to escort 16-year-old Shirley Temple to a Hollywood party. Agar apparently knew Temple earlier since his sister was a classmate of Temple's. Despite the objections of Temple's mother the two became a couple and were married shortly after. Temple's producer David Selznick asked Agar if he wanted to act but he reportedly replied that one actor in the family was enough. Nevertheless, Selznick paid for acting lessons and signed Agar to a contract. Agar's first film was the John Ford-directed Fort Apache (1948) also starring Temple. Agar and Temple also both appeared in Adventure in Baltimore (1949) and had a daughter in 1948 but were divorced the following year. Agar married again in 1951 which lasted until his wife's death in 2000. Agar worked in a string of Westerns and war films such as Sands of Iwo Jima (1949), Breakthrough (1950) and She Wore a Yellow Ribbon (1949). Later when pressed for money he began making the films that would establish his reputation beyond the gossip columns: Revenge of the Creature (1955), The Brain from Planet Arous (1957), Invisible Invaders (1959) and the mind-boggling Zontar, the Thing from Venus (1966). The roles became progressively smaller so Agar sold insurance and real estate on the side. When he appeared in the 1988 film Miracle Mile his dialogue supposedly included obscenities which Agar had always refused to use. He showed the director a way to do the scene without that language and that's how it was filmed. By Lang Thompson DUDLEY MOORE, 1935-2002 Award-winning actor, comedian and musician Dudley Moore died on March 27th at the age of 66. Moore first gained notice in his native England for ground-breaking stage and TV comedy before later building a Hollywood career. Like many of his peers, he had an amiable, open appeal that was balanced against a sharply satiric edge. Moore could play the confused innocent as well as the crafty schemer and tended to command attention wherever he appeared. Among his four marriages were two actresses: Tuesday Weld and Suzy Kendall. Moore was born April 19, 1935 in London. As a child, he had a club foot later corrected by years of surgery that often left him recuperating in the hospital alongside critically wounded soldiers. Moore attended Oxford where he earned a degree in musical composition and met future collaborators Peter Cook, Jonathan Miller and Alan Bennett. The four formed the landmark comedy ensemble Beyond the Fringe. Though often merely labelled as a precursor to Monty Python's Flying Circus, Beyond the Fringe was instrumental in the marriage of the piercing, highly educated sense of humor cultivated by Oxbridge graduates to the modern mass media. In this case it was the revue stage and television where Beyond the Fringe first assaulted the astonished minds of Britons. Moore supplied the music and such songs as "The Sadder and Wiser Beaver," "Man Bites God" and "One Leg Too Few." (You can pick up a CD set with much of the stage show. Unfortunately for future historians the BBC commonly erased tapes at this period - why? - so many of the TV episodes are apparently gone forever.) Moore's first feature film was the 1966 farce The Wrong Box (a Robert Louis Stevenson adaptation) but it was his collaboration with Peter Cook on Bedazzled (1967) that's endured. Unlike its tepid 2000 remake, the original Bedazzled is a wolverine-tough satire of mid-60s culture that hasn't aged a bit: viewers are still as likely to be appalled and entertained at the same time. Moore not only co-wrote the story with Cook but composed the score. Moore appeared in a few more films until starring in 10 (1979). Written and directed by Blake Edwards, this amiable comedy featured Moore (a last-minute replacement for George Segal) caught in a middle-aged crisis and proved popular with both audiences and critics. Moore's career took another turn when his role as a wealthy alcoholic who falls for the proverbial shop girl in Arthur (1981) snagged him an Oscar nomination as Best Actor and a Golden Globe win. However Moore was never able to build on these successes. He starred in a passable remake of Preston Sturges' Unfaithfully Yours (1984), did another Blake Edwards romantic comedy of moderate interest called Micki + Maude (1984, also a Golden Globe winner for Moore), a misfired sequel to Arthur in 1988 and a few other little-seen films. The highlight of this period must certainly be the 1991 series Orchestra where Moore spars with the wonderfully crusty conductor Georg Solti and leads an orchestra of students in what's certainly some of the most delightful television ever made. By Lang Thompson

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

Working titles for the film were Jet Fighter, Jet Command, Jet Squad and Jet Alert. According to a Variety news item, producer Howard Hughes requested that producer Alex Gordon change the title of the film to keep it from being confused with Hughes's production Jet Pilot (see below), filmed in 1950 and released in 1957 by Universal-International. The article indicates that Gordon had already changed the title once at Hughes' request, from Jet Fighter, and that the producer refused to alter the title again. As noted in reviews, much of the film's combat sequences were comprised of stock footage. The film marked the feature film debut of Robert Carricart.

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States 1957

Released in United States 1957