It Ain't Hay


1h 20m 1943

Film Details

Also Known As
Hold Your Horses, Princess O'Hara
Release Date
Mar 13, 1943
Premiere Information
New York opening: 10 Mar 1943
Production Company
Universal Pictures Company, Inc.
Distribution Company
Universal Pictures Company, Inc.
Country
United States
Location
Pasadena, California, United States; Pleasanton, California, United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the short story "Princess O'Hara" by Damon Runyon in Collier's (3 Mar 1934).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 20m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
7,251ft

Synopsis

Private Joe Collins tells his friends, taxi driver Wilbur Hoolihan and unemployed Grover Mockridge, that, having falsely bragged to his colleagues at Camp Saratoga that he "knows all the big stars on Broadway," he has been sent to New York City to arrange entertainment for an army camp show. Later, Wilbur gets into trouble himself, when he becomes trapped inside a cafeteria because he is unable to pay his bill. After Wilbur manages to sneak out of the cafeteria with the help of Grover, Joe and Peggy "Princess" O'Hara, Kitty McGloin, Joe's girl friend, and Gregory Warner, an efficiency expert, are fired. Wilbur then learns that Finnegan, the horse owned by carriage driver King O'Hara, Princess's father, has fallen ill after eating some peppermint candy he gave it, and the cab driver rushes to the stables to nurse his friend's horse back to health. The next day, however, Finnegan dies and the neighborhood accuses Wilbur of killing the elderly horse. In an attempt to raise money to buy the O'Haras a new horse, Wilbur and Grover go to the Sportsmans Club, where they borrow $100 from loan shark Big-Hearted Charlie. They initially lose their money to Slicker, a crooked bookmaker, in a series of phony horse races, but when Grover discovers Slicker's scam, they end up doubling their money. Wilbur soon loses their winnings, however, when he buys a policeman's horse from a Broadway confidence man. Later, Wilbur and Grover are told by gamblers Umbrella Sam, Harry the Horse and Chauncey the Eye that there is a horse named Boimel at the Empire City Racetrack whose owner is "willing to give it away." That night, however, Wilbur and Grover mistakenly take Boimel's stablemate, world-famous racing champion Tea Biscuit. The next day, Tea Biscuit's kidnapping is front-page news, and learning that King has taken a drunken fare to Saratoga, Wilbur and company rush there to tell the carriage driver about their mistake. They hide the horse in the exclusive Oaks Hotel, where Warner has just been hired as manager. Wilbur and Grover manage to escape the hotel with Tea Biscuit, though Warner tells their friends that he will buy the horse for $500, knowing that there is a $10,000 reward for Tea Biscuit's safe return. Separated from Grover and Princess, Wilbur rides Tea Biscuit onto the Saratoga racetrack, unaware that the missing horse has been sentimentally entered in the Saratoga Handicap by its owner, Colonel Brainard. Wilbur is thrown from the horse onto Rhubarb, another horse, which he then rides in the featured race. Thinking that Wilbur is riding the racing champion, Grover places a $100 bet on Tea Biscuit, but Wilbur loses the race when he stops before the finish line to see if he can make the odds go up. Warner then buys Wilbur's horse for $500, and the taxi driver gives the money to Joe so that he can hire entertainment for the army camp show. Meanwhile, it is discovered that Tea Biscuit was the actual winner of the race, earning Grover $10,000, but he tears up the ticket and throws it away. Wilbur and Grover find the ticket, however, and they buy King a new horse and carriage. Joe's army show at the Oaks Hotel is a great success, despite the intrusion of Wilbur and Grover, who have been chased onstage by the irate Warner.

Cast

Bud Abbott

Grover [Mockridge]

Lou Costello

Wilbur Hoolihan

Grace Mcdonald

Kitty McGloin

Cecil Kellaway

King O'Hara

Eugene Pallette

Gregory Warner

Patsy O'connor

Peggy, Princess O'Hara

Leighton Noble

Private Joe Collins

Shemp Howard

Umbrella Sam

Samuel S. Hinds

Colonel Brainard

Eddie Quillan

Harry the Horse

Richard Lane

Slicker

David Hacker

Chauncey the Eye

Andrew Tombes

Big-Hearted Charlie

Wade Boteler

Reilly

Selmer Jackson

Grant

The Vagabonds

The Four Step Brothers

Three Hollywood Blondes

Roller-skate specialty

Harold De Garro

Stilt-walker

Pierre Watkin

Major Harper

William Forrest

Banker

Ralph Peters

Man at microphone

Jack Arnold

Golfer

Bobby Watson

Clerk

Charles Coleman

Doorman

James Flavin

Policeman

Robert Homans

Policeman

Harry Strang

Policeman

Jack Norton

Drunk

Will Stanton

Drunk

George Humbert

Gardener

Tom Hanlon

Radio announcer

Lorin Raker

Hicks

Matt Willis

Bouncer

Mike Mazurki

Bouncer

Sammy Stein

Bouncer

Harry Harvey

Shorty

John Sheehan

Storekeeper

Herbert Vigran

Man in microphone room

Ed Foster

Grafter

Alex Callam

Mug

Herbert Heyes

Manager

Eddie Coke

Attendant

Gene O'donnell

Attendant

Fred Cordova

Attendant

Barry Macollum

Taxi driver

Eddie Bruce

Good Humor man

Paul Dubov

Tout

Charles Bennett

S.P.C.A. driver

Rod Rogers

Jockey

Janet Ann Gallow

Little girl

Kate Lawson

Matron

Hans Herbert

Janitor

Frank Penny

Ticket seller

Charles Sherlock

Mug at door

Ray Miller

Customer

Kit Guard

Fighter

Walter Dennis

Black boy

James Clemons

Dancer

George Bruggeman

Dancer

Spec O'donnell

Newsboy

Stephen Gottlieb

Child

Hal Craig

Film Details

Also Known As
Hold Your Horses, Princess O'Hara
Release Date
Mar 13, 1943
Premiere Information
New York opening: 10 Mar 1943
Production Company
Universal Pictures Company, Inc.
Distribution Company
Universal Pictures Company, Inc.
Country
United States
Location
Pasadena, California, United States; Pleasanton, California, United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the short story "Princess O'Hara" by Damon Runyon in Collier's (3 Mar 1934).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 20m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
7,251ft

Quotes

Go answer the door. It might be Warner.
- Grover Mockridge
It won't do no good. We're all signed up with Universal.
- Wilbur Hoolihan

Trivia

The working title for this film was "Hold Your Horses."

Notes

The working titles of this film were Princess O'Hara and Hold Your Horses. According to Hollywood Reporter, Edward Cline directed second-unit footage, which included background footage shot at a racetrack in Pleasanton, CA in late September 1942. The second unit was forced, due to road conditions, to use stage horses to transport equipment from the Pleasanton train station to the racetrack. Hollywood Reporter also reported that the first unit went on location for three days in mid-October 1942 to film at the Huntington Hotel in Pasadena, CA. In early October 1942, Hollywood Reporter announced Louis Da Pron as the dance director of the film, though Danny Dare is listed in that position by onscreen credits and contemporary reviews. Actress Patsy O'Connor, who played "Peggy, Princess O'Hara" in this film, was the niece of Universal star Donald O'Connor. Damon Runyon's story was previously filmed by Universal in 1935 as Princess O'Hara, starring Jean Parker and Chester Morris and directed by David Burton (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1931-40; F3.3531).