The Indian Runner


2h 5m 1991

Brief Synopsis

Drama about a family in the Midwest, focusing on two brothers and their attempt to establish a balance in their relationship and their lives.

Film Details

Also Known As
Extraño vínculo de sangre, Indian Runner
MPAA Rating
Release Date
1991
Distribution Company
METRO-GOLDWYN-MAYER STUDIOS INC. (MGM )
Location
Omaha, Nebraska, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 5m

Synopsis

Drama about a family in the Midwest, focusing on two brothers and their attempt to establish a balance in their relationship and their lives.

Crew

David L Aaron

Titles

Marshall Adams

Electrician

Gary Alper

Sound Mixer

Andy Anderson

Camera Operator

Ferris Anderson

Camera Assistant

Andy Armstrong

Stunt Man

Marty Balin

Song

Lori A Balton

Location Manager

Lawrence Banks

Location Manager

Chris Bannon

Other

Kathryn Barrett

Location Assistant

Eric J Bates

Assistant Property Master

Jackie Beavers

Extras Agent/Coordinator

Jon Bergholz

Transportation Coordinator

Kenneth Berry

Other

Frank Bianco

Hair Stylist

Big Brother And The Holding Company

Song Performer

Mark Bisgeier

Executive Producer

Alan Blauvelt

Assistant Camera Operator

Thomas Boguski

Production

Billy Bowes

Other

Andy Boyd

Driver

Todd Braden

Other

Danny Bramson

Music Supervisor

Ceil Burrows

Assistant

Allison Caine

Adr

Julia Cameron

Production

Arthur Campbell

Driver

Robert C Campion

Production Accountant

Leslie Carlisle

Assistant Production Coordinator

Jay Cassidy

Editor

John Chickanis

Electrician

Dave Christensen

Other

Brian Clifton

Key Grip

West Clowers

Swing Gang

Michael J Cohen

Assistant Camera Operator

Hallie D'amore

Makeup Artist

Lori Daisley

Assistant Production Coordinator

Forest Dalton

Other

Don Davis

Other

Mike Davis

Driver

Rhonna Deluca

Hair Stylist

Rhonna Deluca

Hair Assistant

Torrey Deluca

Hair Assistant

Carol Depasquale

Script Supervisor

Robert Deschane

Adr Mixer

Thomas Lynn Dodson

Electrician

Lyn Donovan

Casting

Maurizio Dotto

Assistant Camera Operator

Gary Drew

Electrician

Bob Dylan

Song

Garry Elmendorf

Special Effects

Corey Eubanks

Stunt Man

Susie Evans

Makeup Assistant

Rod Farley

Grip

Jesse Oris Farrow

Song

Buzz Feitshans

Camera Operator

Buzz Feitshans

Camera

Joe Fogarty

Office Assistant

John Fogerty

Song

Brian Fowler

Other

Mark Fragale

Assistant Camera Operator

Robert Friedman

Foley

Cody Frost

Transportation Co-Captain

Zane Gehring

Driver

George Gershwin

Song

Debra Ginsberg

Office Assistant

Anita Giordano

Caterer

Alan Gitlin

Camera Assistant

Nancy Glissman

Makeup Artist

Cranston Gobbo

Dolly Grip

Sam Goldrich

Consultant

Marvin Graham

Other

Shari Griffin

Costume Supervisor

Ray Griffith

Special Thanks To

Bill Groom

Art Director

Brett Haller

Song Performer

Eric Haller

Song

Eric Haller

Assistant Director

Michael Haller

Production Designer

David Shamroy Hamburger

Production Manager

David Shamroy Hamburger

Line Producer

John Hammond

Soloist

Frank Harmer

Swing Gang

Billy Bob Hendricks

Electrician

Dubose Heyward

Song

Bud Hill

On-Set Dresser

Derek R. Hill

Set Decorator

Michael Hoenig

Music

Dean Holder

Driver

Frank Holgate

Camera

Mary Cay Hollander

Production Coordinator

Ray Holmes

Driver

Cress Horne

Helicopter Pilot

Sharon Hughes

Special Thanks To

Jim Ingram

Other

Joichi Ito

Other

Donna A Jacklosky

Assistant Sound Editor

Jerry Jackson

Consultant

Kelley Jackson

Driver

Jefferson Airplane

Song Performer

Dennis Jensen

Other

Jeff Jensen

Stunt Coordinator

Dana Johnson

Assistant Camera Operator

Don Johnson

Driver

Jeffrey A Johnson

Best Boy Grip

Thelma Johnson

Driver

Janis Joplin

Song Performer

Jill Jordan

Special Thanks To

Maritha Karlsson

Stand-In

David Katz

Video Playback

Eddie Katz

Craft Service

Brian Kay

Transportation Captain

Shane Kerwin

Stand-In

Jack Kirschner

Sound Editor

James J Klinger

Sound Editor

Jas Klinger

Adr

Rory Knepp

Assistant Camera Operator

Sarah E. Knowles

Assistant Art Director

Jay Koiwai

Other

Frank Kostenko

Assistant Director

Gregg Landaker

Rerecording

Weston Lant

Grip

Craig Levitz

Song Performer

David Lindley

Soloist

Phil Linson

Editor

Bob Loeser

Set Production Assistant

Leslie Loftis

Driver

Mark Long

Other

Russel J Lyster

Camera

Russel J Lyster

Gaffer

James Maddox

Driver

James Maddox

Special Effects Assistant

Stacy Maddux

Location Assistant

Jennifer Mangan

Assistant Editor

Salvatore Marcuzzo

Other

Pete Martinez

Video Playback

Debra S Martino

Security

John A Martino

Security

Dave Mason

Song

Sato Masuzawa

Post-Production Coordinator

Sato Masuzawa

Set Production Assistant

Clark Mathis

Other

Barney Mccoy

Driver

Cary Mccrystal

Camera Assistant

Bud Mcguire

Song

Michelle Mckee

Driver

Dennis Mcneill

Color Timer

Steve Miller

Driver

Christian Minkler

Other

Michael Minkler

Rerecording

Jeff Mirowski

Stand-In

Richard A Mitchell

Best Boy

P J Morgan

Special Thanks To

Lloyd Moriarity

Key Grip

Leslie Morris

Music Contractor

Patricia Morrison

Coproducer

Thom Mount

Executive Producer

Jeffrey A Murrell

Grip

Jim Neilan

Best Boy

Jack Nitzsche

Music

Skip O'keefe

Special Thanks To

Eric Ohannesom

Costumes

Jill Ohanneson

Costume Designer

Keith Olsen

Foley

Maureen Osborne-beall

Production Coordinator

Kip Parker

Driver

David Pauker

Special Thanks To

Daymon Payne

Driver

Debra Peele

Transportation

Sean Penn

Screenplay

David Perry

Other

Don Phillips

Producer

Cecil Pickney

Security

Trish Place

Swing Gang

Ralph Price

Driver

Robert Price

Security

Kenn Rabin

Special Thanks To

Brian Ralph

Negative Cutting

Vincent Rapini

Grip

James Reischling

Grip

Charlene Richards

Adr Mixer

Tony Richmond

Director Of Photography

Artist Robinson

Assistant Director

Marvin Runge

Driver

Jemma Scarisbrick

Set Costumer

James Schelette

Driver

John Schissler

Other

Andrew Schmetterling

Boom Operator

Corey Schmidt

Apprentice

Beth Semans

Special Thanks To

Tom Shaw

Property Master

Kathy Shepherd

Special Thanks To

James Earl Simmett

Special Thanks To

Susan Slominski-caster

Stand-In

Steve F.b. Smith

Consultant

Jo-anne Smith-ojeil

Makeup Artist

Mike Stanforth

Driver

James Stewart

Driver

Kelly Richards Stitt

Accounting Assistant

Film Details

Also Known As
Extraño vínculo de sangre, Indian Runner
MPAA Rating
Release Date
1991
Distribution Company
METRO-GOLDWYN-MAYER STUDIOS INC. (MGM )
Location
Omaha, Nebraska, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 5m

Articles

TCM Remembers Charles Bronson - Sept. 13th - TCM Remembers Charles Bronson this Saturday, Sept. 13th 2003.


Turner Classic Movies will honor the passing of Hollywood action star Charles Bronson on Saturday, Sept. 13, with a four-film tribute.

After years of playing supporting roles in numerous Western, action and war films, including THE MAGNIFICENT SEVEN (1960, 8 p.m.) and THE DIRTY DOZEN (1967, 1:15 a.m.), Bronson finally achieved worldwide stardom as a leading man during the late 1960s and early 1970s. TCM's tribute will also include THE GREAT ESCAPE (1963, 10:15 p.m.), Bronson's second teaming with Steve McQueen and James Coburn, and will conclude with FROM NOON TILL THREE (1976, 4 a.m.), co-starring Jill Ireland.

TCM will alter it's prime-time schedule this Saturday, Sept. 13th. The following changes will take place:

8:00 PM - The Magnificent Seven (1960)
10:15 PM - The Great Escape (1963)
1:15 AM - The Dirty Dozen (1967)
4:00 AM - From Noon Till Three (1976)

Charles Bronson, 1921-2003

Charles Bronson, the tough, stony-faced actor who was one of the most recognizable action heroes in cinema, died on August 30 in Los Angeles from complications from pneumonia. He was 81.

He was born Charles Buchinsky on November 3, 1921 in Ehrenfeld, Pennsylvania, one of fifteen children born to Lithuanian immigrant parents. Although he was the only child to have graduated high school, he worked in the coalmines to support his family until he joined the army to serve as a tail gunner during World War II. He used his money from the G.I. Bill to study art in Philadelphia, but while working as a set designer for a Philadelphia theater troupe, he landed a few small roles in some productions and immediately found acting to be the craft for him.

Bronson took his new career turn seriously, moved to California, and enrolled for acting classes at The Pasadena Playhouse. An instructor there recommended him to director Henry Hathaway for a movie role and the result was his debut in Hathaway's You're in the Navy Now (1951). He secured more bit parts in films like John Sturges' drama The People Against O'Hara (1951), and Joseph Newman's Bloodhounds of Broadway (1952). More substantial roles came in George Cukor's Pat and Mike (1952, where he is beaten up by Katharine Hepburn!); Andre de Toth's classic 3-D thriller House of Wax (1953, as Vincent Price's mute assistant, Igor); and De Toth's fine low-budget noir Crime Wave (1954).

Despite his formidable presence, his leads were confined to a string of B pictures like Gene Fowler's Gang War; and Roger Corman's tight Machine Gun Kelly (both 1958). Following his own television series, Man With a Camera (1958-60), Bronson had his first taste of film stardom when director Sturges casted him as Bernardo, one of the The Magnificent Seven (1960). Bronson displayed a powerful charisma, comfortably holding his own in a high-powered cast that included Yul Brynner and Steve McQueen. A few more solid roles followed in Sturges' The Great Escape (1963), and Robert Aldrich's classic war picture The Dirty Dozen (1967), before Bronson made the decision to follow the European trail of other American actors like Clint Eastwood and Lee Van Cleef. It was there that his hard, taciturn screen personae exploded in full force. In 1968 alone, he had four hit films: Henri Verneuil's Guns for San Sebastian, Buzz Kulik's Villa Rides, Jean Herman's Adieu l'ami which was a smash in France; and the classic Sergio Leone spaghetti Western Once Upon a Time in the West.

These films established Bronson as a huge box-office draw in Europe, and with some more stylish hits like Rene Clement's Rider on the Rain (1969), and Terence Young's Cold Sweat (1971) he soon became one of the most popular film stars in the world. It wasn't easy for Bronson to translate that success back in his homeland. In fact, his first few films on his return stateside: Michael Winners' Chato's Land, and The Mechanic (both 1972), and Richard Fleischer's Mr. Majestyk (1973), were surprisingly routine pictures. It wasn't until he collaborated with Winner again for the controversial Death Wish (1974), an urban revenge thriller about an architect who turns vigilante when his wife and daughter are raped, did he notch his first stateside hit. The next few years would be a fruitful period for Bronson as he rode on a wave of fine films and commercial success: a depression era streetfighter in Walter Hill's terrific, if underrated Hard Times (1975); Frank Gilroy's charming offbeat black comedy From Noon Till Three (1976, the best of many teamings with his second wife, Jill Ireland); Tom Gries tense Breakheart Pass; and Don Siegel's cold-war thriller Telefon (1977).

Sadly, Bronson could not keep up the momentum of good movies, and by the '80s he was starring in a string of forgettable films like Ten to Midnight (1983), The Evil That Men Do (1984), and Murphy's Law (1986, all directed by J. Lee Thompson). A notable exception to all that tripe was John Mackenzie's fine telefilm Act of Vengeance (1986), where he earned critical acclaim in the role of United Mine Workers official Jack Yablonski. Although he more or less fell into semi-retirement in the '90s, his performances in Sean Penn's The Indian Runner (1991); and the title role of Michael Anderson's The Sea Wolf (1993) proved to many that Bronson had the makings of a fine character actor. He was married to actress Jill Ireland from 1968 until her death from breast cancer in 1990. He is survived by his third wife Kim Weeks, six children, and two grandchildren.

by Michael T. Toole
Tcm Remembers Charles Bronson - Sept. 13Th - Tcm Remembers Charles Bronson This Saturday, Sept. 13Th 2003.

TCM Remembers Charles Bronson - Sept. 13th - TCM Remembers Charles Bronson this Saturday, Sept. 13th 2003.

Turner Classic Movies will honor the passing of Hollywood action star Charles Bronson on Saturday, Sept. 13, with a four-film tribute. After years of playing supporting roles in numerous Western, action and war films, including THE MAGNIFICENT SEVEN (1960, 8 p.m.) and THE DIRTY DOZEN (1967, 1:15 a.m.), Bronson finally achieved worldwide stardom as a leading man during the late 1960s and early 1970s. TCM's tribute will also include THE GREAT ESCAPE (1963, 10:15 p.m.), Bronson's second teaming with Steve McQueen and James Coburn, and will conclude with FROM NOON TILL THREE (1976, 4 a.m.), co-starring Jill Ireland. TCM will alter it's prime-time schedule this Saturday, Sept. 13th. The following changes will take place: 8:00 PM - The Magnificent Seven (1960) 10:15 PM - The Great Escape (1963) 1:15 AM - The Dirty Dozen (1967) 4:00 AM - From Noon Till Three (1976) Charles Bronson, 1921-2003 Charles Bronson, the tough, stony-faced actor who was one of the most recognizable action heroes in cinema, died on August 30 in Los Angeles from complications from pneumonia. He was 81. He was born Charles Buchinsky on November 3, 1921 in Ehrenfeld, Pennsylvania, one of fifteen children born to Lithuanian immigrant parents. Although he was the only child to have graduated high school, he worked in the coalmines to support his family until he joined the army to serve as a tail gunner during World War II. He used his money from the G.I. Bill to study art in Philadelphia, but while working as a set designer for a Philadelphia theater troupe, he landed a few small roles in some productions and immediately found acting to be the craft for him. Bronson took his new career turn seriously, moved to California, and enrolled for acting classes at The Pasadena Playhouse. An instructor there recommended him to director Henry Hathaway for a movie role and the result was his debut in Hathaway's You're in the Navy Now (1951). He secured more bit parts in films like John Sturges' drama The People Against O'Hara (1951), and Joseph Newman's Bloodhounds of Broadway (1952). More substantial roles came in George Cukor's Pat and Mike (1952, where he is beaten up by Katharine Hepburn!); Andre de Toth's classic 3-D thriller House of Wax (1953, as Vincent Price's mute assistant, Igor); and De Toth's fine low-budget noir Crime Wave (1954). Despite his formidable presence, his leads were confined to a string of B pictures like Gene Fowler's Gang War; and Roger Corman's tight Machine Gun Kelly (both 1958). Following his own television series, Man With a Camera (1958-60), Bronson had his first taste of film stardom when director Sturges casted him as Bernardo, one of the The Magnificent Seven (1960). Bronson displayed a powerful charisma, comfortably holding his own in a high-powered cast that included Yul Brynner and Steve McQueen. A few more solid roles followed in Sturges' The Great Escape (1963), and Robert Aldrich's classic war picture The Dirty Dozen (1967), before Bronson made the decision to follow the European trail of other American actors like Clint Eastwood and Lee Van Cleef. It was there that his hard, taciturn screen personae exploded in full force. In 1968 alone, he had four hit films: Henri Verneuil's Guns for San Sebastian, Buzz Kulik's Villa Rides, Jean Herman's Adieu l'ami which was a smash in France; and the classic Sergio Leone spaghetti Western Once Upon a Time in the West. These films established Bronson as a huge box-office draw in Europe, and with some more stylish hits like Rene Clement's Rider on the Rain (1969), and Terence Young's Cold Sweat (1971) he soon became one of the most popular film stars in the world. It wasn't easy for Bronson to translate that success back in his homeland. In fact, his first few films on his return stateside: Michael Winners' Chato's Land, and The Mechanic (both 1972), and Richard Fleischer's Mr. Majestyk (1973), were surprisingly routine pictures. It wasn't until he collaborated with Winner again for the controversial Death Wish (1974), an urban revenge thriller about an architect who turns vigilante when his wife and daughter are raped, did he notch his first stateside hit. The next few years would be a fruitful period for Bronson as he rode on a wave of fine films and commercial success: a depression era streetfighter in Walter Hill's terrific, if underrated Hard Times (1975); Frank Gilroy's charming offbeat black comedy From Noon Till Three (1976, the best of many teamings with his second wife, Jill Ireland); Tom Gries tense Breakheart Pass; and Don Siegel's cold-war thriller Telefon (1977). Sadly, Bronson could not keep up the momentum of good movies, and by the '80s he was starring in a string of forgettable films like Ten to Midnight (1983), The Evil That Men Do (1984), and Murphy's Law (1986, all directed by J. Lee Thompson). A notable exception to all that tripe was John Mackenzie's fine telefilm Act of Vengeance (1986), where he earned critical acclaim in the role of United Mine Workers official Jack Yablonski. Although he more or less fell into semi-retirement in the '90s, his performances in Sean Penn's The Indian Runner (1991); and the title role of Michael Anderson's The Sea Wolf (1993) proved to many that Bronson had the makings of a fine character actor. He was married to actress Jill Ireland from 1968 until her death from breast cancer in 1990. He is survived by his third wife Kim Weeks, six children, and two grandchildren. by Michael T. Toole

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Fall September 20, 1991

Released in United States on Video May 27, 1992

Released in United States August 1991

Released in United States September 1991

Released in United States November 1991

Released in United States 1999

Shown at Locarno International Film Festival (in competition) August 7-16, 1991.

Shown at Toronto Festival of Festivals September 5-14, 1991.

Shown at London Film Festival November 6-21, 1991.

Shown at San Francisco International Film Festival (Special Screening) April 22 - May 6, 1999.

Feature directorial debut for actor Sean Penn.

Began shooting August 27, 1990.

Completed shooting October 30, 1990.

Film noted "In loving memory of Hal Ashby, Frank Bianco and John Cassavetes."

Film noted "Inspired by the song 'Highway Patrolman' by Bruce Springsteen."

Released in United States Fall September 20, 1991

Released in United States on Video May 27, 1992

Released in United States August 1991 (Shown at Locarno International Film Festival (in competition) August 7-16, 1991.)

Released in United States September 1991 (Shown at Toronto Festival of Festivals September 5-14, 1991.)

Released in United States November 1991 (Shown at London Film Festival November 6-21, 1991.)

Released in United States 1999 (Shown at San Francisco International Film Festival (Special Screening) April 22 - May 6, 1999.)