In the Line of Fire


2h 3m 1993

Brief Synopsis

An aging Secret Service agent fights to save the president from an assassin.

Film Details

Also Known As
Dans la ligne de mire, En la línea de Fuego, skottlinjen
MPAA Rating
Genre
Drama
Action
Thriller
Political
Release Date
1993
Distribution Company
Sony Pictures Releasing
Location
Washington, DC, USA; Chicago, Illinois, USA; Los Angeles, Sony Pictures Studios, Culver City, California, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 3m

Synopsis

A Secret Service agent who failed to prevent the assassination of J.F.K. in 1963 tries to come to terms with his past, while attempting to stop another Presidential assassination.

Crew

Bill Abbott

Music Editor

Michael Adams

Stunts

Paul Agid

Editor

Edward Aiona

Property Master

Carl Aldana

Storyboard Artist

John Alden

Stunts

Kokayi Ampah

Location Manager

Mitchell Amundsen

Camera Operator

Jeffrey D Apple

Producer

Christopher Assells

Dialogue Editor

John Bailey

Dp/Cinematographer

John Bailey

Director Of Photography

Daniel W. Barringer

Stunts

Ken Bates

Stunts

Jackie Baugh

Production Accountant

Christine Baur

Stunts

Gregg Baxter

Sound Editor

Bob Beher

Assistant Sound Editor

Nancy Bernstein

Visual Effects

Robert A. Blackburn

Other

Paul Bode

Camera Assistant

Bob Bowman

Music

Kenneth Brain

Visual Effects

Sherri Bramlett

Hair Stylist

Nick Brett

Stunts

Ron Brinkmann

Animator

Wiley T Buchanan Iii

Special Thanks To

David Burnett

Chief Lighting Technician

Willie Burton

Sound

Patrick H Caddell

Special Thanks To

A Charles Carnaggio

Set Decorator

Violet Cazanjian

Dga Trainee

1881 Paris Cerruti

Wardrobe

Nino Cerruti

Wardrobe

Jerome Chen

Animator

Paul Cichocki

Assistant Editor

Roydon Clark

Stunts

Lee Cleary

Assistant Director

Anne V. Coates

Editor

Bridget M. Cook

Hair Stylist

Mark A Crouch

Other

Charles Davis

Special Thanks To

Miles Davis

Song Performer

Miles Davis

Song

Enrico Demelis

Music Coordinator

Keith Dillin

Transportation Captain

Dino Dimuro

Sound Effects Editor

David March Douglas

Animator

Al Dubin

Song

Jann Engel

Set Designer

Walter A Forbes

Special Thanks To

James K Fox

Other

Scott Fuller

Camera Assistant

John H Fullmer

Special Thanks To

Harry Garvin

Camera Operator

Rocky Allen Gehr

Special Effects

Bruno George

Visual Effects Supervisor

Steve Geray

Stunts

Scott Gershin

Sound Effects

Andy Gill

Stunts

Jack Gill

Stunts

Laura Graham

Adr Editor

Robert M Greenberg

Visual Effects

Melinda Grieger

Stand-In

Susanna Griffith

Casting Associate

Michael Grillo

Assistant Director

Peter Gulla

Camera Assistant

Mauricio Gutierrez

Assistant Camera Operator

Kirk D. Hansen

Other

Lorenz Hart

Song

Orwin Harvey

Stunts

Gary Hecker

Foley Artist

Janet Hirshenson

Casting

Michael Hirshenson

Casting Associate

Chris Hogan

Dialogue Editor

Larry Holt

Stunts

John Horton

Special Thanks To

Dustin Huber

Gaffer

Herman Hupfeld

Song

Terry Jackson

Stunts

Loren Janes

Stunts

Gary Jay

Camera Assistant

Jane Jenkins

Casting

Gary Jensen

Stunts

David Michael Katz

Assistant Director

Gail Katz

Executive Producer

Constance A Kazmer

Adr Editor

Gene Kearney

Key Grip

Jamie Kehoe

Craft Service

Randy Kelley

Sound Effects Editor

Larry Kemp

Foley

Steven Kemper

Editor

Werner Keppler

Makeup Artist

Scott Kilburn

Animator

Lilly Kilvert

Production Designer

Jacqueline King

Assistant

Rick Kline

Rerecording

Peter Kohn

Assistant Director

Gabor Kover

Camera Operator

Brad Kuehn

Visual Effects

Barbara Lacy

Makeup

Mark Lasoff

Animator

David Lawson

Other

Foongy Lee

Assistant Location Manager

David V Lester

Unit Production Manager

Marvin E. Lewis

Boom Operator

Kelly Lindquist

Set Costumer

Kara Lindstrom

Set Decorator

Harry Link

Song

William James Madden

Stunts

Jeff Maguire

Screenplay

Blake Maniquis

Apprentice

Ned Martin

Camera Assistant

Holt Marvell

Song

Jeff Matakovich

Visual Effects

Bruce V. Mcbroom

Photography

Kaye Mccall

Accounting Assistant

Jim Mccoy

Makeup Artist

Buck Mcdancer

Stunts

Charles Mcgill

Production Assistant

Bill Mcintosh

Stunts

Kerry Lyn Mckissick

Script Supervisor

Brian Mcnulty

Assistant

George Merkert

Visual Effects

Carl Meyer

Special Thanks To

Gordon Michaels

Stand-In

Sue Bea Montgomery

Other

Gayle Moore

Special Thanks To

Andrea Morricone

Music

Ennio Morricone

Music Conductor

Ennio Morricone

Music

Michael Moyer

Lighting Technician

Hal Nelson

Grip

John Nelson

Visual Effects Supervisor

Daniel Grant North

Set Costumer

Carol A. O'connell

Hair Stylist

Dan O'connell

Foley Artist

Kevin O'connell

Rerecording

George Orrison

Stand-In

Jerry Parr

Special Thanks To

Franco Patrignani

Other

Daniel Penhale

Production Assistant

Karen Penhale

Production Coordinator

Wolfgang Petersen

Executive Producer

Erica Edell Phillips

Costume Designer

Joseph Prado

Transportation Co-Captain

Bob Putynkowski

Color Timer

Alan Rankin

Sound

Don Reddy

Camera Operator

Danis Regal

Production Supervisor

Dan Rich

Dialogue Editor

Jay B Richardson

Sound Effects Editor

Tony Rivetti

Camera Assistant

Denise Lynne Roberts

Stunts

John Robotham

Stunts

Richard Rodgers

Song

Ann Ronell

Song

Melissa Rooker

Assistant

Tom Rooker

Assistant

Bob Rosenthal

Coproducer

Charlie Saldana

Key Grip

Richard A Sandberg

Special Thanks To

Sharon Schaffer

Stunts

William O Schultz

Animator

Burtis Scott

Editor

Mike Sexton

Assistant Property Master

Alex Sharp

Stunts

Spike Silver

Stunts

Jeri Simon

Assistant

Corbett Simons

Production Assistant

Frank Smathers

Sound Effects Editor

Robert Snow

Technical Advisor

Mark Sorell

Animator

Scott Stahler

Production Assistant

Wylie Stateman

Sound Editor

Amy Stofsky

Costume Supervisor

Joe Stone

Stunts

Michael L Stone

Camera Operator

Jack Strachey

Song

Cynthia Streit

Production Coordinator

Dean Striepeke

Video Assist/Playback

Philip Strub

Special Thanks To

Peter Michael Sullivan

Foley Editor

Robert Sullivan

Assistant Editor

Kathina Szeto

Assistant Camera Operator

Neezer Tarleton

Stunts

Vivian Treves

Other

Loranne Turgeon

Assistant

David Valdes

Executive Producer

Michele C. Vallillo

Visual Effects

Buddy Van Horn

Stunt Coordinator

Mark Vargo

Dp/Cinematographer

Mark Vargo

Director Of Photography

Fabio Venturi

Assistant Engineer

Bill Voigtlander

Adr Editor

Michael Wallace

Location Manager

Jack Warner

Special Thanks To

John Warnke

Art Director

Harry Warren

Song

Mike Watson

Stunts

Film Details

Also Known As
Dans la ligne de mire, En la línea de Fuego, skottlinjen
MPAA Rating
Genre
Drama
Action
Thriller
Political
Release Date
1993
Distribution Company
Sony Pictures Releasing
Location
Washington, DC, USA; Chicago, Illinois, USA; Los Angeles, Sony Pictures Studios, Culver City, California, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 3m

Award Nominations

Best Editing

1993
Anne V. Coates

Best Original Screenplay

1993

Best Supporting Actor

1993
John Malkovich

Articles

In the Line of Fire


Few if any other Hollywood leading men have proven to be Clint Eastwood's equal for sheer durability as a top audience draw. One of his best latter-day vehicles, In the Line of Fire (1993), utilized a dramatic backdrop seldom if ever explored by Hollywood - the workings of the United States Secret Service - and delivered a taut, exciting tale of loss and redemption.

The story introduces Eastwood as Frank Horrigan, a 30-plus year veteran of the agency, given to retreating to his lonely DC apartment or a local piano bar once his day's work is done. Summoned on a standard investigation of suspicious activity, Horrigan and young partner Al D'Andrea (Dylan McDermott) are let into a small apartment by a nervous landlady, and come upon the disturbing sight of a perverse shrine to the JFK assassination.

Horrigan, as it turns out, has deeper reason for being unnerved; he had been assigned to Dealey Plaza on November 22, 1963, and remained the last active agent from the only detail to ever lose a president. Matters worsen when the mysterious tenant (John Malkovich) brazenly phones Horrigan at home. Displaying a fanboy's intimacy with the arc of Frank's career, the caller (identifying himself as "Booth") coolly apprises the agent of his intent to slay the current president as he stumps on his bid for re-election.

While Horrigan successfully lobbies his understanding director (John Mahoney) for transfer to the presidential detail, his concerns are lost on the bullheaded White House Chief Of Staff (Fred Dalton Thompson), who's giving more priority to his boss's standing in the polls than to his well-being. As Frank takes his positions along the campaign trail, he clumsily though successfully pursues a flirtation with field agent Lilly Raines (Rene Russo) while waiting for his new "confidante" to show his hand.

For his part, "Booth" is seen oh-so-carefully laying the groundwork for getting within shooting distance of the president, employing multiple disguises and murdering unfortunates who stumble too close to his plans. Utilizing trace-defying technology, he continues to call Frank, cruelly tweaking him about failures past and future. The agent responds with dogged investigation that uncovers "Booth's" true name, how he came upon his deadly skills, and the motives behind his demented scheme. Horrigan's race to derail Booth's anticipated date with destiny drives In the Line of Fire to a tense climax.

Beyond leavening the familiar Eastwood characterization of the old-school law enforcer with nagging self-doubts and regrets (which the star ably puts over), In the Line of Fire also offers its protagonist an opponent of refreshingly equal weight. Malkovich's silky delivery makes the amoral, cunning Leary one of the most chilling screen villains of recent memory, a dark mirror of the government-trained protector Horrigan. His cat-and-mouse conversations with Eastwood remain absolutely riveting, and the Best Supporting Actor Oscar nomination he received for his efforts was well warranted.

Developed from a long-harbored notion of producer Jeff Apple to craft an accurate portrait of the Secret Service, Jeff Maguire's Oscar-nominated screenplay is logical and lean, unfolding Malkovich's machinations in a manner that directly and deftly builds the suspense. After signing on to the project, Eastwood courted the able German craftsman Wolfgang Petersen to direct, and he drew uniformly convincing efforts from a very capable cast.

In the Line of Fire's third Oscar nomination went to the venerable editor Anne V. Coates, and the film's gripping pace is a testament to her skill. Cinematographer John Bailey ably captured the grandeur of Washington, and the sequences of Horrigan's empty nightlife were obviously inspired by the paintings of Edward Hopper. The lush score came courtesy of Ennio Morricone, who did such memorable work for Eastwood's signature spaghetti Westerns of the '60s. In the Line of Fire opened to strong critical praise and ultimately garnered a strong $102 million in domestic box-office receipts.

Producer: Jeff Apple
Director: Wolfgang Petersen
Screenplay: Jeff Maguire
Cinematography: John Bailey
Film Editing: Anne V. Coates
Art Direction: John Warnke
Music: Ennio Morricone
Cast: Clint Eastwood (Frank Horrigan), John Malkovich (Mitch Leary), Rene Russo (Lilly Raines), Dylan McDermott (Al D'Andrea), Gary Cole (Bill Watts), Fred Dalton Thompson (Harry Sargent), John Mahoney (Sam Campagna).
C-129m. Letterboxed. Closed captioning.

by Jay Steinberg
In The Line Of Fire

In the Line of Fire

Few if any other Hollywood leading men have proven to be Clint Eastwood's equal for sheer durability as a top audience draw. One of his best latter-day vehicles, In the Line of Fire (1993), utilized a dramatic backdrop seldom if ever explored by Hollywood - the workings of the United States Secret Service - and delivered a taut, exciting tale of loss and redemption. The story introduces Eastwood as Frank Horrigan, a 30-plus year veteran of the agency, given to retreating to his lonely DC apartment or a local piano bar once his day's work is done. Summoned on a standard investigation of suspicious activity, Horrigan and young partner Al D'Andrea (Dylan McDermott) are let into a small apartment by a nervous landlady, and come upon the disturbing sight of a perverse shrine to the JFK assassination. Horrigan, as it turns out, has deeper reason for being unnerved; he had been assigned to Dealey Plaza on November 22, 1963, and remained the last active agent from the only detail to ever lose a president. Matters worsen when the mysterious tenant (John Malkovich) brazenly phones Horrigan at home. Displaying a fanboy's intimacy with the arc of Frank's career, the caller (identifying himself as "Booth") coolly apprises the agent of his intent to slay the current president as he stumps on his bid for re-election. While Horrigan successfully lobbies his understanding director (John Mahoney) for transfer to the presidential detail, his concerns are lost on the bullheaded White House Chief Of Staff (Fred Dalton Thompson), who's giving more priority to his boss's standing in the polls than to his well-being. As Frank takes his positions along the campaign trail, he clumsily though successfully pursues a flirtation with field agent Lilly Raines (Rene Russo) while waiting for his new "confidante" to show his hand. For his part, "Booth" is seen oh-so-carefully laying the groundwork for getting within shooting distance of the president, employing multiple disguises and murdering unfortunates who stumble too close to his plans. Utilizing trace-defying technology, he continues to call Frank, cruelly tweaking him about failures past and future. The agent responds with dogged investigation that uncovers "Booth's" true name, how he came upon his deadly skills, and the motives behind his demented scheme. Horrigan's race to derail Booth's anticipated date with destiny drives In the Line of Fire to a tense climax. Beyond leavening the familiar Eastwood characterization of the old-school law enforcer with nagging self-doubts and regrets (which the star ably puts over), In the Line of Fire also offers its protagonist an opponent of refreshingly equal weight. Malkovich's silky delivery makes the amoral, cunning Leary one of the most chilling screen villains of recent memory, a dark mirror of the government-trained protector Horrigan. His cat-and-mouse conversations with Eastwood remain absolutely riveting, and the Best Supporting Actor Oscar nomination he received for his efforts was well warranted. Developed from a long-harbored notion of producer Jeff Apple to craft an accurate portrait of the Secret Service, Jeff Maguire's Oscar-nominated screenplay is logical and lean, unfolding Malkovich's machinations in a manner that directly and deftly builds the suspense. After signing on to the project, Eastwood courted the able German craftsman Wolfgang Petersen to direct, and he drew uniformly convincing efforts from a very capable cast. In the Line of Fire's third Oscar nomination went to the venerable editor Anne V. Coates, and the film's gripping pace is a testament to her skill. Cinematographer John Bailey ably captured the grandeur of Washington, and the sequences of Horrigan's empty nightlife were obviously inspired by the paintings of Edward Hopper. The lush score came courtesy of Ennio Morricone, who did such memorable work for Eastwood's signature spaghetti Westerns of the '60s. In the Line of Fire opened to strong critical praise and ultimately garnered a strong $102 million in domestic box-office receipts. Producer: Jeff Apple Director: Wolfgang Petersen Screenplay: Jeff Maguire Cinematography: John Bailey Film Editing: Anne V. Coates Art Direction: John Warnke Music: Ennio Morricone Cast: Clint Eastwood (Frank Horrigan), John Malkovich (Mitch Leary), Rene Russo (Lilly Raines), Dylan McDermott (Al D'Andrea), Gary Cole (Bill Watts), Fred Dalton Thompson (Harry Sargent), John Mahoney (Sam Campagna). C-129m. Letterboxed. Closed captioning. by Jay Steinberg

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Jeff Maguire was nominated for best original screenplay (1993) by the Writers Guild of America.

Released in United States Summer July 9, 1993

Released in United States on Video February 9, 1994

Released in United States 1993

Shown at Venice Film Festival (Venetian Nights) August 31 - September 11, 1993.

Began shooting October 3, 1992.

Completed shooting January 11, 1993.

The screenplay was reportedly purchased for nearly $1,000,000.

Released in United States Summer July 9, 1993

Released in United States on Video February 9, 1994

Released in United States 1993 (Shown at Venice Film Festival (Venetian Nights) August 31 - September 11, 1993.)