In Old Cheyenne


58m 1941

Brief Synopsis

Roy is a newspaper reporter. He goes to Cheyenne to cover the activities of supposed bad guy Arapahoe Brown. Roy, of course, discovers who the real bad guy is.

Film Details

Release Date
Mar 28, 1941
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Republic Pictures Corp.
Distribution Company
Republic Pictures Corp.
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
58m
Sound
Mono (RCA Sound System)
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
5,096ft (6 reels)

Synopsis

New York reporter Steve Blane travels by train to Cheyenne, Wyoming, where he intends to investigate the notorious Arapaho Brown, a rustler and outlaw who has been blamed for the ongoing feud between cattlemen and settlers. On the way he meets Spanish dancer Dolores Cansino, who reveals that her American father, Tim Casey, is the newspaper owner whom Steve will be contacting. Their train is held up by a masked gang led by Davidge, although the men lead the passengers to believe that Arapaho is behind the robbery. Dolores and Steve are given a wagon ride to town, where they are greeted by Tim, who calls Dolores "Della," and Sam Drummond, a cattle baron and prominent citizen. The party held in Dolores' honor is interrupted by Davidge's gang, however, who hold up everyone. Drummond, who is secretly Davidge's boss, helps the gang escape. Later, Steve is captured by the gang, who are about to lynch him when he is saved by the wagon driver he met earlier. When the old man takes him to his home, he reveals that he is Arapaho Brown and that Drummond is trying to force out the settlers in James County so that he can take control of their land. Arapaho's foster daughter Squeak prevails upon Steve to stay for the settler's square dance that evening, but once again Davidge and his men show up. Steve leads the gang away from the settlers and escapes with help from his horse "Trigger." Davidge believes that he has killed Steve, and Drummond decides to blame the murder on Arapaho. Steve tells the whole story to Dolores and Tim, who is shot and wounded by the gang after he prints the truth about Arapaho and Drummond. As he is getting a wagon to take Tim to Arapaho for treatment, Steve overhears Davidge's men planning to attack the settlers. The men see Steve and Dolores as they put Tim in the wagon and chase them to James County. Steve entrusts Dolores and Tim to Squeak and some of the others while he rushes to find Arapaho, who is organizing the men for the upcoming attack. Squeak leads the defense as the gang sets fire to the house, and soon Steve, Arapaho and the men arrive, and Davidge's men surrender. Later, Steve has become the editor of Tim's paper, and after printing a story about Drummond's conviction, he tells Tim to print a notice about his engagement to Dolores.

Film Details

Release Date
Mar 28, 1941
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Republic Pictures Corp.
Distribution Company
Republic Pictures Corp.
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
58m
Sound
Mono (RCA Sound System)
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
5,096ft (6 reels)

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

A Hollywood Reporter production chart lists Les Orlebeck as the film's editor, although the onscreen credits list Charles Craft. In Old Cheyenne marked the film debut of Donnell "Spade" Cooley (1910-1969), who began his career as a fiddle player with The Sons of the Pioneers before forming his own orchestra. Known as the "king of western swing," Cooley enjoyed great success as the host of a popular television variety program, The Spade Cooley Show, which ran on Los Angeles station KTLA (1948-1956). In 1961, Cooley was arrested for, and convicted of, the murder of his estranged wife. In November 1969, Cooley was given a short leave to perform at a benefit for the Alameda County Deputy Sheriff's Association, during which he died of a heart attack. Modern sources include the following actors in the cast: Bob Woodward, Jim Corey, Cactus Mack, George Lloyd, Billy Benedict, Jack O'Shea, Edward Peil, Sr., Merrill McCormack, Ted Mapes, Ben Corbett, Nick Thompson and Frank Ellis.