Impromptu


1h 49m 1991
Impromptu

Brief Synopsis

Novelist George Sand dumps her lover to pursue Frederic Chopin.

Film Details

Genre
Comedy
Romance
Biography
Release Date
1991
Distribution Company
Hemdale Releasing Corporation
Location
Angers, France; Paris, France; Chevreuse Valley, France

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 49m

Synopsis

The romantic escapades of the female French writer George Sand (1804-1876) and Polish composer Frederic Chopin, featuring their infamous circle of friends including leading artists of the time such as Franz Liszt and Eugene Delacroix.

Crew

Florence Andracca

Dresser

Valerie Arlaud

Other

Mary Bailey

Consultant

Joelle Balland

Stunt Man

Jenny Beavan

Costume Designer

Kevin Beirne

Sound Editor

Christiane Berroyer

Hair

Jean-pierre Berroyer

Hair

Paul Bertault

Dubbing Mixer

Roger Berthier

Music Contractor

Fabienne Bressan

Hair

Philippe Brun

Camera Operator

Pippa Cleator

Assistant Costume Designer

Gerard Daoudal

Art Director

Bruno De Keyzer

Director Of Photography

Louise Dechampfleury

Dialogue Editor

Anne Demontangon

Assistant Editor

Anne Demontangon

Music Editor

Nathalie Doux

Dresser

Sophie Drouin

Other

Sophie Drouin

Production Accountant

Michael Ellis

Editor

Elie Ferszt

Electrician

Charles Freess

Key Grip

Jean-yves Freess

Grip

Christophe Gachet

Assistant Director

Joyce Gallie

Casting

Cedric Gerard

Makeup

Jacques-thomas Gerard

Dubbing Mixer

Peter Glossop

Sound Mixer

Patrick Gordon

Unit Production Manager

Michel Guerin

Carpenter

Catherine Hall

Other

Euries Hardy

Other

Laura Harrison

Sound

Josette Jover

Other

Jacques Kazandjian

Other

Sarah Kernochan

Screenplay

Michel Klochendler

Sound Effects Editor

Vincent Lascoumes

Assistant Director

Michel Lefrancois

Gaffer

Jean-marie Leroy

Photography

Olivier Lhoste

Location Manager

Mario Luraschi

Stunt Coordinator

John S. Lyons

Casting

Francoise Marcepoil

Scenic Artist

Colette Martin

Accountant

Michel Mellier

Sound

Françoise Menidrey

Casting

Joanna Merlin

Casting

Grethe Mitchell

Dialogue Editor

Lucie Mollof

Post-Production Coordinator

Denis Moncel

Electrician

Guy Montbillard

Props

Martine Mory

Assistant Editor

Jean Nachbaur

Executive Producer

Gadou Naudin

Foley

Julien Naudin

Foley

Jean-pierre Nossereau

Props Buyer

Steve O'brien

Sound

Stuart Oken

Producer

John-hughes Oppel

Assistant Camera Operator

Jean-michel Penkhoss

Location Assistant

Jacqeline Perpere

Extras Agent/Coordinator

Philippe Peyraud

Electrician

Gilbert Pieri

Special Effects

Gilbert Pieri

Props

Dominique Pinto

Assistant Camera Operator

Alain Pitrel

On-Set Dresser

Dominique Plez

Makeup

Denis Poulain

Wig Supplier

Leslie Rain

Stunt Man

Jean-luc Russier

Makeup

Philippe Scieux

Technical Advisor

Anne Seibel

Assistant Set Decorator

Bernard Seitz

Assistant Director

Daniel A Sherkow

Producer

Gerard Sionneau

Generator Operator

Yonnty Solomon

Technical Advisor

Nicholas Sommermeyer

Grip

Elsa Soustre

Wardrobe

Alex Steyermark

Music Supervisor

John Strauss

Music Arranger

John Strauss

Music Supervisor

Jackson Stricanne

Grip

Trish Twomey

Casting

Dorothee Veron

Sound Editor

Patrick Veron

Construction Manager

Chris Walker

Music Arranger

Chris Walker

Music Conductor

Joan Washington

Dialogue Coach

Blanche Weisenfeld

Production Coordinator

Suzanne Weisenfeld

Production Supervisor

Sally Wigmal

Casting

Albert Wiss

Other

Robert Worley

Assistant Costume Designer

Film Details

Genre
Comedy
Romance
Biography
Release Date
1991
Distribution Company
Hemdale Releasing Corporation
Location
Angers, France; Paris, France; Chevreuse Valley, France

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 49m

Articles

Impromptu


The relationship between the Polish composer Frédéric Chopin (Hugh Grant) and the French writer Amandine Aurore Lucile Dupin, better known under her pen name of George Sand (Judy Davis), is the subject of director James Lapine's 1991 film debut Impromptu . Also in the cast were Julian Sands as Franz Liszt, Mandy Patinkin as Alfred de Musset, Bernadette Peters as the Countess Marie d'Agoult, and Emma Thompson as the Duchess D'Antan.

Impromptu was a truly international film. To comply with Common Market restrictions, the film was incorporated as a British work, but coproduced by Ariane (a French company) and Sovereign Films (an American distributor), who put up the $6 million budget. Shot on location at the 18th century Chateau des Briottieres, near Angers in the Loire Valley of France (now a 4-star luxury hotel) between September 25 and November 15, 1989, the film was produced by Jean Nachbaur (as executive producer), Daniel A. Sherkow, and Stuart Oken. Oken wanted to give Lapine, famous for his collaboration as a playwright and director with Stephen Sondheim on Sunday in the Park with George (with Peters and Patinkin) and Into the Woods, a chance to direct a film. Lapine had long wanted to direct, but had trouble finding the right script. That opportunity came when his wife, screenwriter Sarah Kernochan ( Nine ½ Weeks (1986)) was laid off due to the 1988 Writers Guild of America strike. Lapine encouraged her to take advantage of the time off to "do something for herself." The result was the screenplay for Impromptu , which Kernochan described as "a free association of a personal nature based on a historical theme." To prepare for their roles as composers and performers, Grant and Sands worked with a piano coach, and John Strauss, a music consultant who had worked on Amadeus (1984) and Ragtime (1981).

Critics were mixed when Impromptu was released in the spring of 1991, with Janet Maslin writing that Lapine "never leans as far toward outright farce as Ken Russell might have, but his approach brings Mr. Russell's wildly irreverent biographical films to mind," and Roger Ebert calling Impromptu "a disorganized, confusing but amusing biopic." Despite an Independent Spirit Award for Judy Davis as Best Female Lead, Impromptu only earned a little over $4 million at the US box office.

By Lorraine LoBianco

SOURCES:

Corbett, Patricia "In 'Impromptu,' It's George Sand and Chopin Again" The New York Times 7 Jan 90
Ebert, Roger "Impromptu" Chicago Sun-Times 3 May 91
https://www.frenchentree.com/holidays-in-france/regional-holiday-guides/chateau-des-briottieres/
The Internet Movie Database
Maslin, Janet "Impromptu Review/Film; Chopin, George Sand, Liszt and Some Others" The New York Times 12 Apr 91
Trollinger, Gary "Not much point to 'Impromptu'" Reading Eagle 13 Jul 91
Impromptu

Impromptu

The relationship between the Polish composer Frédéric Chopin (Hugh Grant) and the French writer Amandine Aurore Lucile Dupin, better known under her pen name of George Sand (Judy Davis), is the subject of director James Lapine's 1991 film debut Impromptu . Also in the cast were Julian Sands as Franz Liszt, Mandy Patinkin as Alfred de Musset, Bernadette Peters as the Countess Marie d'Agoult, and Emma Thompson as the Duchess D'Antan. Impromptu was a truly international film. To comply with Common Market restrictions, the film was incorporated as a British work, but coproduced by Ariane (a French company) and Sovereign Films (an American distributor), who put up the $6 million budget. Shot on location at the 18th century Chateau des Briottieres, near Angers in the Loire Valley of France (now a 4-star luxury hotel) between September 25 and November 15, 1989, the film was produced by Jean Nachbaur (as executive producer), Daniel A. Sherkow, and Stuart Oken. Oken wanted to give Lapine, famous for his collaboration as a playwright and director with Stephen Sondheim on Sunday in the Park with George (with Peters and Patinkin) and Into the Woods, a chance to direct a film. Lapine had long wanted to direct, but had trouble finding the right script. That opportunity came when his wife, screenwriter Sarah Kernochan ( Nine ½ Weeks (1986)) was laid off due to the 1988 Writers Guild of America strike. Lapine encouraged her to take advantage of the time off to "do something for herself." The result was the screenplay for Impromptu , which Kernochan described as "a free association of a personal nature based on a historical theme." To prepare for their roles as composers and performers, Grant and Sands worked with a piano coach, and John Strauss, a music consultant who had worked on Amadeus (1984) and Ragtime (1981). Critics were mixed when Impromptu was released in the spring of 1991, with Janet Maslin writing that Lapine "never leans as far toward outright farce as Ken Russell might have, but his approach brings Mr. Russell's wildly irreverent biographical films to mind," and Roger Ebert calling Impromptu "a disorganized, confusing but amusing biopic." Despite an Independent Spirit Award for Judy Davis as Best Female Lead, Impromptu only earned a little over $4 million at the US box office. By Lorraine LoBianco SOURCES: Corbett, Patricia "In 'Impromptu,' It's George Sand and Chopin Again" The New York Times 7 Jan 90 Ebert, Roger "Impromptu" Chicago Sun-Times 3 May 91 https://www.frenchentree.com/holidays-in-france/regional-holiday-guides/chateau-des-briottieres/ The Internet Movie Database Maslin, Janet "Impromptu Review/Film; Chopin, George Sand, Liszt and Some Others" The New York Times 12 Apr 91 Trollinger, Gary "Not much point to 'Impromptu'" Reading Eagle 13 Jul 91

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Winner of the Independent Feature Project's 1991 Spirit Award for Best Actress (Judy Davis).

Released in United States 1991

Released in United States April 1991

Released in United States June 1991

Released in United States on Video October 30, 1991

Released in United States Spring April 12, 1991

Re-released in United States September 13, 1991

Wide Release in United States May 3, 1991

Shown at Filmfest Munich (International Program) June 1991.

Shown at San Francisco International Film Festival April 26-May 9, 1991.

Shown at WorldFest Houston International Film Festival April 19-28, 1991.

Feature film directorial debut for playwright and stage director James Lapine.

Began shooting September 25, 1989.

Completed shooting November 15, 1989.

Released in United States 1991 (Shown at San Francisco International Film Festival April 26-May 9, 1991.)

Released in United States Spring April 12, 1991

Wide Release in United States May 3, 1991

Released in United States June 1991 (Shown at Filmfest Munich (International Program) June 1991.)

Re-released in United States September 13, 1991 (Los Angeles)

Released in United States on Video October 30, 1991

Released in United States April 1991 (Shown at WorldFest Houston International Film Festival April 19-28, 1991.)