Illegal Entry


1h 24m 1949

Film Details

Release Date
Jun 1949
Premiere Information
Washington, D.C. premiere: 8 Jun 1949
Production Company
Universal-International Pictures Co., Inc.
Distribution Company
Universal Pictures Company, Inc.
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 24m
Sound
Mono (Western Electric Recording)
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1

Synopsis

After a forest ranger finds an unidentifiable Polish survivor of the Dachau concentration camp dead in the wilderness of San Bernadino County, the matter is referred to Daniel Collins, the Los Angeles district chief for the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service. Collins places a photograph of the dead man in a local newspaper, which results in a call from the man's cousin, who states that he paid $2,000 to have the man brought into the country. The cousin is murdered, however, before he can tell Collins to whom he paid the money, saying only that the transaction took place at the Blue Danube Café. Collins then goes to Washington, D.C., where he asks that an undercover agent be assigned to the case, preferably Bert Powers, a friend of Wally O'Neill, the deceased husband of Anna Duvak, the German-American owner of the Blue Danube Café. Though initially reluctant, Bert, an Air Force veteran living in Amarillo, Texas, agrees to work for Collins and heads for Los Angeles. Pretending to be an out-of-work flyer, Bert quickly makes friends with Anna, and because she likes him, she tries to discourage him from seeing her, in hopes of keeping him out of the clutches of gangster Nick Gruber. Nevertheless, Bert is soon contacted by the gangster's associates, who hire the flyer to smuggle an illegal alien into the United States from Mexico. Later, Nick hires Bert on a permanent basis, much to the annoyance of his more careful associate, Zack Richards. For the first few weeks, though, Bert is assigned to nothing more than routine cargo runs. Finally, he is assigned a smuggling flight from Mexico, and is met at the Ontario, California airport by Collins and his men. The plane is empty, however, as the smugglers threw all the immigrants out of the plane while over the Pacific Ocean, because they suspected one of being a government agent. Afterward, Dutch Lempo, the fugitive head of the smuggling organization, calls a meeting at his home in Mexico, and orders Nick to find the spy within their organization. They then set a trap for the infiltrator by having a seemingly drunk Richards falsely tell the flyers that Dutch is meeting with Nick at a downtown Los Angeles warehouse. Before Bert falls for the trap, however, Anna asks him out, and the two are accosted at a nearby bar by Lee Sloan, another flyer and a jealous, unwanted suitor of Anna's. Lee then inadvertently saves Bert's life by beating him to the warehouse, in hopes of telling Dutch that Anna is cheating on him, and is killed by the gangsters. The next day, Bert goes to see Anna, and she admits that she knows that he is the government agent and invited him out in order to keep him from Richards' trap. After learning that she is working for the smugglers only to protect her illegal immigrant brother Stephen, Bert agrees to help her smuggle Stephen out of Los Angeles. Stephen, however, thinks that he has only caused his sister more trouble, and commits suicide by hanging himself. When Anna refuses to go to work the next day, Dutch insists on being flown into Los Angeles to see her. Bert is assigned to Dutch's flight, but is caught by Joe Bottsy, one of Dutch's thugs, when he telephones Collins from Mexico. Though initially knocked unconscious by Bert, Joe manages to call Nick in Los Angeles, who radios Richards, the co-pilot on Dutch's flight, about Bert's true allegiance. Bert manages to knock Richards unconscious, however, so Dutch is forced to let him fly the plane into Los Angeles. Knowing that he will be killed as soon as he lands the plane, Bert executes a crash landing, which knocks the gun out of Dutch's hand. Though injured in the crash, Bert survives with minor injuries, while Dutch and his gang are arrested and later convicted on numerous smuggling charges. For her cooperation, all charges are dropped against Anna and she is released into Bert's "custody."

Film Details

Release Date
Jun 1949
Premiere Information
Washington, D.C. premiere: 8 Jun 1949
Production Company
Universal-International Pictures Co., Inc.
Distribution Company
Universal Pictures Company, Inc.
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 24m
Sound
Mono (Western Electric Recording)
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1

Articles

Kenneth Tobey (1917-2003)


Kenneth Tobey, the sandy-haired, tough-looking American character actor who appeared in over 100 films, but is best remembered as Captain Patrick Hendry in the Sci-Fi classic, The Thing From Another World (1951), died on December 22nd of natural causes at a hospital in Rancho Mirage, California. He was 86.

Born in Oakland, California on March 23, 1917, Tobey originally intended to be a lawyer before a stint with the University of California Little Theater changed his mind. From there, he went straight to New York and spent nearly two years studying acting at the Neighborhood Playhouse, where his classmates included Gregory Peck, Eli Wallach and Tony Randall. Throughout the '40s, Tobey acted on Broadway and in stock before relocating to Hollywood. Once there, Tobey soon found himself playing a tough soldier in films like I Was a Male War Bride and Twelve O' Clock High (both 1949); or a tough police officer in Kiss Tomorrow Goodbye and Three Secrets (both 1950). Such roles were hardly surprising, given Tobey's craggy features, unsmiling countenance and rough voice.

Needless to say, no-nonsense, authority figures would be Tobey's calling for the remainder of his career; yet given the right role, he had the talent to make it memorable: the smart, likeable Captain Hendrey in The Thing From Another World (1951); the gallant Colonel Jack Evans in the "prehistoric dinosaur attacks an urban center" genre chiller The Beast from 20,000 Fathoms (1953, a must-see film for fans of special effects wizard, Ray Harryhausen; and as Bat Masterson, holding his own against Kirk Douglas and Burt Lancaster in Gunfight at the O.K. Corral (1957).

Television would also offer Tobey much work: he had his own action series as chopper pilot Chuck Martin in Whirlybirds (1957-59); and had a recurring role as Assistant District Attorney Alvin in Perry Mason (1957-66). He would also be kept busy with guest appearances in countless westerns (Gunsmoke, Bonanza, The Virginian) and cop shows (The Rockford Files, Barnaby Jones, Ironside) for the next two decades. Most amusingly, the tail end of Tobey's career saw some self-deprecating cameo spots in such contemporary shockers as The Howling (1981); Strange Invaders (1983) and his role reprisal of Captain Hendry in The Attack of the B-Movie Monsters (2002). Tobey is survived by a daughter, two stepchildren, and two grandchildren.

by Michael T. Toole
Kenneth Tobey (1917-2003)

Kenneth Tobey (1917-2003)

Kenneth Tobey, the sandy-haired, tough-looking American character actor who appeared in over 100 films, but is best remembered as Captain Patrick Hendry in the Sci-Fi classic, The Thing From Another World (1951), died on December 22nd of natural causes at a hospital in Rancho Mirage, California. He was 86. Born in Oakland, California on March 23, 1917, Tobey originally intended to be a lawyer before a stint with the University of California Little Theater changed his mind. From there, he went straight to New York and spent nearly two years studying acting at the Neighborhood Playhouse, where his classmates included Gregory Peck, Eli Wallach and Tony Randall. Throughout the '40s, Tobey acted on Broadway and in stock before relocating to Hollywood. Once there, Tobey soon found himself playing a tough soldier in films like I Was a Male War Bride and Twelve O' Clock High (both 1949); or a tough police officer in Kiss Tomorrow Goodbye and Three Secrets (both 1950). Such roles were hardly surprising, given Tobey's craggy features, unsmiling countenance and rough voice. Needless to say, no-nonsense, authority figures would be Tobey's calling for the remainder of his career; yet given the right role, he had the talent to make it memorable: the smart, likeable Captain Hendrey in The Thing From Another World (1951); the gallant Colonel Jack Evans in the "prehistoric dinosaur attacks an urban center" genre chiller The Beast from 20,000 Fathoms (1953, a must-see film for fans of special effects wizard, Ray Harryhausen; and as Bat Masterson, holding his own against Kirk Douglas and Burt Lancaster in Gunfight at the O.K. Corral (1957). Television would also offer Tobey much work: he had his own action series as chopper pilot Chuck Martin in Whirlybirds (1957-59); and had a recurring role as Assistant District Attorney Alvin in Perry Mason (1957-66). He would also be kept busy with guest appearances in countless westerns (Gunsmoke, Bonanza, The Virginian) and cop shows (The Rockford Files, Barnaby Jones, Ironside) for the next two decades. Most amusingly, the tail end of Tobey's career saw some self-deprecating cameo spots in such contemporary shockers as The Howling (1981); Strange Invaders (1983) and his role reprisal of Captain Hendry in The Attack of the B-Movie Monsters (2002). Tobey is survived by a daughter, two stepchildren, and two grandchildren. by Michael T. Toole

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

The film contains the following written foreword: "We gratefully acknowledge the generous cooperation and assistance of the Immigration and Naturalization Service in the making of this picture." The film opens with statements about the Immigration and Naturalization Service spoken by Tom Clark, the United States Attorney General, and Watson B. Miller, the Commissioner of the Immigration and Naturalization Service. According to a Los Angeles Times news item, portions of the picture were filmed along the Mexican border. Hollywood Reporter news items include David Opatoshu and Houseley Stevenson in the cast, but their appearance in the released film has not been confirmed.