Idea Girl


60m 1946

Brief Synopsis

Larry Brewster (Jess Barker), partner in the music publishing firm of Brewster and Crow, returns from a trip to find that his partner, J. C. Crow (Alan Mowbray) has hired Pat O'Rourke (Julie Bishop)as a song plugger. Larry doesn't approve of the plan and, in a bad mood, refuses to see composer Wilfred Potts (George Dolenz)who is offering a song for publication. Pat, in spite of Larry's objections, stays on the job. She has the firm promote an amateur song-writing contest, and the winner is a submission by Potts, but because he used the name of Wicks, the firm can't locate him and is facing prosecution on charges of using the mail to conduct a fraudulent contest.

Film Details

Release Date
Feb 8, 1946
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Universal Pictures Company, Inc.
Distribution Company
Universal Pictures Company, Inc.
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
60m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
6 reels

Synopsis

When music publisher Larry Brewster returns from a business trip, he is outraged to learn that his partner, the lecherous J. C. Crow, has fired their song promoter and replaced him with the pretty, spirited Pat O'Rourke. His mood softens somewhat when Crow tells him that Pat has arranged for popular singer Cynthia Winters to perform one of their new songs on the radio. That evening, Larry accompanies Pat to the elegant Casino Royale club, and Cynthia's rendition of the song is met with great acclaim. When Larry leaves to call Crow, Pat is joined by Cynthia's manager, Ken Williams, who tells her that Brewster & Crow did not obtain authorization to use Cynthia's picture on the sheet music. Larry returns to the table, and when Pat informs him that she gave Williams twenty percent of the company to keep him from suing, he faints. The next day, as Larry is fuming about Pat in Crow's office, phone calls come in from two of the country's top songwriters, who say they have signed contracts with Pat. Elated, Larry takes Pat out to dinner that night, and she tells him she has made the two new songwriters partners in the company as well. The next morning, aspiring songwriter Wilfred Potts, who has repeatedly been given the brush-off by Larry, tells Mabel, the brassy receptionist at the publishing company, that his fiancée Evelina is trying to arrange an audition for him with her employer, the famous maestro Arturo Coveleski. When Larry comes in, he learns that Pat has devised an amateur songwriting contest, with a $1,000 prize for the best new composition. Larry rejects the idea, but Mabel, unaware of his decision, mails out the contest announcements, and the entries flood the office. Potts, aware that Coveleski detests popular music, enters the contest under the name "William Wicks." The contest draws the support both of cultural associations and city hall, as Commissioner P. J. Maple announces his intention to sing the winning song himself at the award ceremony. Potts, as "Wicks," receives a letter informing him he has won the contest, but when Evelina tells him she has at last arranged his audition with Coveleski, he sadly crumples the letter up. A week later, the publishers still have not been able to locate their winner, and Larry and Crow are threatened with prosecution for mail fraud if they do not award the prize in twenty-four hours. A frantic but fruitless search ensues, and just as Pat offers to tear up her contract, Larry finds one of Potts's wadded-up flyers and realizes he is the man for whom they have been looking. Potts is in the middle of his audition for Coveleski when Larry, Crow and Pat burst in, with the police in pursuit. Faced with maestro's disapproving glare, Potts denies that he wrote the song, and the publishers spend the night in jail. The next day, however, Evelina persuades Potts to tell the truth, and the award ceremony at last takes place. Cynthia sings the winning song, as the commissioner has been struck with laryngitis, and during her performance, Coveleski confesses that he had entered the contest himself. Pat then sheepishly admits that she and Crow gave twenty percent of the company to the commissioner, and despite his exasperation, Larry kisses her.

Film Details

Release Date
Feb 8, 1946
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Universal Pictures Company, Inc.
Distribution Company
Universal Pictures Company, Inc.
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
60m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
6 reels

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

According to a April 3, 1945 news item in Hollywood Reporter, Charles Barton was originally assigned to serve as associate producer and director of this film.