Iceland


1h 19m 1942

Brief Synopsis

Marine, James Murfin, is unaware of Icelandic customs. When he flirts with Katina her Icelandic family take his actions as a proposal of marriage to Katina. Desperately wanting out, James gets his buddy to help him. Good Luck!

Film Details

Release Date
Oct 2, 1942
Premiere Information
World premiere in San Diego: 21 Sep 1942
Production Company
Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp.
Distribution Company
Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp.
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 19m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
7,119ft (8 reels)

Synopsis

When womanizer Corp. James Murfin lands with the other U.S. Marines at Reykjavik, Iceland, he immediately starts chasing the local girls, including naïve, pretty Katina Jonsdottir. Katina, who is bored by her persistent beau, Sverdrup Svensson, tries to get rid of him by telling him that two years earlier, she let a man kiss her at a sports carnival in Switzerland. When Sverdrup sees Katina dancing with James at the popular Hotel Jorg later that evening, he assumes that James is the man Katina kissed. Katina is completely taken in by James's smooth talking, and when she returns home that evening, she allows her father, younger sister Helga, grandmother and aunt Sophie to believe that she and James are engaged. The family has been pressing Katina to marry Sverdrup, for Helga is engaged to Valtyr Olafson, whose wealthy father insists on adhering to an old tradition that the elder sister must marry first. Desperately needing the Olafson money to resuscitate their failing restaurant, the family wants to get Katina's marriage out of the way. Sverdrup glumly agrees to step aside so that Katina can marry James, who plays along with the charade when he meets her family. James's pal and fellow Marine, Slip Riggs, is angered by James's disregard of the seriousness of the situation and the potential consequences, and urges him to tell Katina the truth. Two weeks pass as James romances Katina, until finally he tries to tell her the truth at a Red Cross benefit carnival. Katina, by now believing that James really intends to marry her, does not understand, and so Slip arranges for her to meet Adele Wynn, a beautiful singer whom James jilted in America a few years previously. Adele is performing at the Hotel Jorg, and after meeting her, Katina becomes disillusioned about James and tries to tell her family that the wedding is off. James follows her home and attempts to apologize, saying that his flirtatious nature will never let him settle down. Determined now to win James, Katina registers for a marriage license, causing James to volunteer for special detail to escape her. When the family discovers that he is gone, they insist that she marry Sverdrup so that Helga can marry Valtyr. Katina claims that she and James were married by a Marine chaplain just before he left, and so Helga and Valtyr's marriage takes place two weeks later. On the day of the ceremony, James returns and is furious to discover the new lie that Katina has told. Slip learns that after the wedding, the family plans to serenade Katina and James on their way to their own bridal chamber, and informs James. The serenading begins, and a smug James accompanies the increasingly nervous Katina. Katina tries to escape James's kisses when they are left alone, and it is not until Slip arrives with Herr Tegner, the minister, that she realizes that James does indeed want to marry her. The couple are wed, and soon after, Katina stages a skating show to entertain the Marines.

Film Details

Release Date
Oct 2, 1942
Premiere Information
World premiere in San Diego: 21 Sep 1942
Production Company
Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp.
Distribution Company
Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp.
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 19m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
7,119ft (8 reels)

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

According to a November 7, 1941 Hollywood Reporter news item, this film was originally intended as a "sequel" to the 1941 Twentieth Century-Fox production Sun Valley Serenade, which also starrred Sonja Henie and John Payne. Joan Davis, Lynn Bari, Milton Berle and Glenn Miller and his orchestra, who were featured in the first picture, were to appear in this one as well. In notes from a November 7, 1941 conference with studio production chief Darryl F. Zanuck, contained in the Twentieth Century-Fox Produced Scripts Collection at the UCLA Arts-Special Collections Library, the above-named players are not listed in the potential cast, although Cesar Romero is listed for the "Slip Riggs" role. Conference notes from February 2, 1942 reveal that producer William LeBaron was going to contact Claude Thornhill's and Harry James's bands "as to availability and prices," and March 10, 1942 conference notes indicate that Victor Borge was being considered for the role of "Sverdrup Svensson."
       According to a October 29, 1941 Hollywood Reporter news item, the studio sent cameraman Bowie Kennedy to Iceland to photograph "backgrounds" for the film. Actor Felix Bressart was borrowed from M-G-M for the production. According to the MPAA/PCA Collection at the AMPAS Library, the PCA rejected a March 24, 1942 version of the script because of "the comedy characterization of a minister [Herr Tegner]" and "the offensively suggestive lines and situations connected with the scenes in and around the bridal chamber." A revised script, dated April 1, 1942, was approved by the MPAA. According to a December 10, 1942 Hollywood Reporter news item, the studio decided to retitle the film Love on Ice for its foreign release "following protests from the OWI, representatives of Iceland and newspaper critics that the treatment of natives was an affront to the people of the country." The New York Times review also noted that "reports [were] coming in from Iceland" that people there were "feeling severe resentment" about the film, which they felt was "decidedly unflattering to their nature and national mode of life."