Ice Castles


1h 49m 1978
Ice Castles

Brief Synopsis

A young girl is on top of the world until a tragic accident dashes her hopes and dreams of becoming a world-class figure skater.

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Genre
Romance
Drama
Sports
Release Date
1978

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 49m
Sound
Mono
Color
Color (Metrocolor)

Synopsis

A girl who is training to become a champion figure skater has an accident while practicing and is blinded. When a young man enters her life, she is lifted out of her self-pity and he and her family convince her that she can still fulfill her dreams.

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Genre
Romance
Drama
Sports
Release Date
1978

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 49m
Sound
Mono
Color
Color (Metrocolor)

Award Nominations

Best Song

1978

Articles

Ice Castles


"Together they reached for the impossible," read the poster for the tearjerker romance Ice Castles (1978). Lexie Winston (played by figure skating champion Lynn-Holly Johnson) is a sixteen-year-old from Iowa who appears to be on her way to the Olympics when a freak accident threatens to rob her of both her sight and her big chance. Also in the cast were Robby Benson as her supportive boyfriend, Colleen Dewhurst, Tom Skerritt, and Jennifer Warren.

Made for MGM and released through Sony Pictures, Ice Castles was the first film directed by Donald Wrye (who co-wrote the screenplay with Gary L. Bain) and was shot on location in Colorado Springs, Colorado and Minnesota. Lynn-Holly Johnson was performing with the Ice Capades when she was introduced to the producers by Ice Capades head Michael Kirbay and her coach John Nicks. In-between shows, she flew to Minnesota to do a script reading and to Toronto for a screen test. Although this would be Johnson's first film, she would not let herself be intimidated when was asked to do a nude scene. Johnson refused and shut down production for an entire day. Ironically, although Johnson kept her modesty, the film was condemned by The National Catholic Office for Motion Pictures (formerly the Catholic Legion of Decency), making it one of the last to be condemned before the office disbanded in 1980.

When the film was released, journalist Bob Thomas called the film "unabashedly sentimental" but praised Johnson as "astonishing in her film debut [...] Her lack of polish makes her performance all the more moving, and she skates like the wind." Roger Ebert wasn't as kind. He deplored the then trend towards love stories that required at least one character to be injured or die tragically, as in Love Story (1970) and The Other Side of the Mountain (1975), writing, "isn't there something creepy about an audience that walks in knowing the girl's going to blind herself, and waits for it to happen? [...] Call me Scrooge; stories like this make me cringe. I don't deny the bravery of the characters being portrayed -- I just object to the emotional bankruptcy of the people making the movies."

The hit song from the film Through the Eyes of Love , sung by Melissa Manchester, was written by Mavin Hamlisch and Carole Bayer Sager, and nominated for an Academy Award. Lynn-Holly Johnson was nominated for a Golden Globe Award for "New Star of the Year in a Motion Picture".

Ice Castles paralleled Johnson's life in two ways - she had been a figure skater whose competitive career ended with an injury and, thirty years later, a blood clot threatened her life. Lexie Winston was blinded by a clot, Lynn-Holly Johnson suffered a stroke in 2010 because of a clot that escaped from her heart. During her recuperation, she called her Ice Castles star, Robby Benson, who she had not seen since filming ended, but who had also undergone several heart surgeries. He told The Orange County Register that Johnson was "inspirational, just as lovely and compassionate as she was when we worked together. [...] Our conversation felt like it could've been a week after the movie wrapped."

by Lorraine LoBianco

SOURCES:

Ebert, Roger "Ice Castles" The Chicago Sun-Times 29 Jan 79
The Internet Movie Database
Sharon, Keith "The Bond Girl and Her Very Public Stroke" The Orange County Register 7 Feb 13
Thomas, Bob "Ice Castles" The Reading Eagle 27 Jan 79
Ice Castles

Ice Castles

"Together they reached for the impossible," read the poster for the tearjerker romance Ice Castles (1978). Lexie Winston (played by figure skating champion Lynn-Holly Johnson) is a sixteen-year-old from Iowa who appears to be on her way to the Olympics when a freak accident threatens to rob her of both her sight and her big chance. Also in the cast were Robby Benson as her supportive boyfriend, Colleen Dewhurst, Tom Skerritt, and Jennifer Warren. Made for MGM and released through Sony Pictures, Ice Castles was the first film directed by Donald Wrye (who co-wrote the screenplay with Gary L. Bain) and was shot on location in Colorado Springs, Colorado and Minnesota. Lynn-Holly Johnson was performing with the Ice Capades when she was introduced to the producers by Ice Capades head Michael Kirbay and her coach John Nicks. In-between shows, she flew to Minnesota to do a script reading and to Toronto for a screen test. Although this would be Johnson's first film, she would not let herself be intimidated when was asked to do a nude scene. Johnson refused and shut down production for an entire day. Ironically, although Johnson kept her modesty, the film was condemned by The National Catholic Office for Motion Pictures (formerly the Catholic Legion of Decency), making it one of the last to be condemned before the office disbanded in 1980. When the film was released, journalist Bob Thomas called the film "unabashedly sentimental" but praised Johnson as "astonishing in her film debut [...] Her lack of polish makes her performance all the more moving, and she skates like the wind." Roger Ebert wasn't as kind. He deplored the then trend towards love stories that required at least one character to be injured or die tragically, as in Love Story (1970) and The Other Side of the Mountain (1975), writing, "isn't there something creepy about an audience that walks in knowing the girl's going to blind herself, and waits for it to happen? [...] Call me Scrooge; stories like this make me cringe. I don't deny the bravery of the characters being portrayed -- I just object to the emotional bankruptcy of the people making the movies." The hit song from the film Through the Eyes of Love , sung by Melissa Manchester, was written by Mavin Hamlisch and Carole Bayer Sager, and nominated for an Academy Award. Lynn-Holly Johnson was nominated for a Golden Globe Award for "New Star of the Year in a Motion Picture". Ice Castles paralleled Johnson's life in two ways - she had been a figure skater whose competitive career ended with an injury and, thirty years later, a blood clot threatened her life. Lexie Winston was blinded by a clot, Lynn-Holly Johnson suffered a stroke in 2010 because of a clot that escaped from her heart. During her recuperation, she called her Ice Castles star, Robby Benson, who she had not seen since filming ended, but who had also undergone several heart surgeries. He told The Orange County Register that Johnson was "inspirational, just as lovely and compassionate as she was when we worked together. [...] Our conversation felt like it could've been a week after the movie wrapped." by Lorraine LoBianco SOURCES: Ebert, Roger "Ice Castles" The Chicago Sun-Times 29 Jan 79 The Internet Movie Database Sharon, Keith "The Bond Girl and Her Very Public Stroke" The Orange County Register 7 Feb 13 Thomas, Bob "Ice Castles" The Reading Eagle 27 Jan 79

Quotes

We forgot about the roses
- Nick Peterson

Trivia

'Lynne Holly Johnson' says she was repeatedly pressured to do a nude scene in this film, which she refused to do. She says this incident makes her laugh and say "if you only knew!" whenever someone tells her what a great family film this movie was.

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States December 1978

Released in United States Winter December 1, 1978

Released in United States December 1978

Released in United States Winter December 1, 1978