I Was a Spy


1h 23m 1933

Film Details

Release Date
Dec 15, 1933
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Gaumont-British Picture Corp.
Distribution Company
Fox Film Corp.
Country
Great Britain and United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the autobiography I Was a Spy by Marthe McKenna in Sunday Dispatch (31 Jul--2 Oct 1932).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 23m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
7,750ft (10 reels)

Synopsis

In 1915 while Belgium is occupied by the Germans, Marthe Cnockhaert becomes a volunteer nurse at a military hospital in Roulers, treating both German and captured allied soldiers. She becomes a spy for the allies, which leads to a romance with Stephan, a German officer who is the secret leader of the liberation movement. After many daring adventures, Marthe is captured, but the gallant Stephan turns himself in so that she will not be executed. Marthe is imprisoned for the duration of the war, and when she is freed by the allies, she cries with joy as she realizes the good that has come from her and Stephan's sacrifices.

Film Details

Release Date
Dec 15, 1933
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Gaumont-British Picture Corp.
Distribution Company
Fox Film Corp.
Country
Great Britain and United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the autobiography I Was a Spy by Marthe McKenna in Sunday Dispatch (31 Jul--2 Oct 1932).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 23m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
7,750ft (10 reels)

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

The film contains a written statement which reads: "Self preservation has forced States and armies in every age to exact the penalty of death from a spy. A secret service agent, who is not actuated by any sordid motive, but inspired by patriotism, and ready to pay the well known forfeit, deserves respect and honor from those he serves so faithfully. Marthe Cnockhaert fulfilled in every respect the conditions which make the terrible profession of a spy dignified and honorable." The statement is signed by Winston S. Churchill, who was the British Secretary of State for War from 1918 to 1921. According to an Hollywood Reporter news item, the film was "tradeshown" in London the last week of July 1933. According to the Twentieth Century-Fox Produced Scripts Collection at the UCLA Theater Arts Library, the version shown in Great Britian ran 8,360 feet.