Howard's End


2h 22m 1992

Brief Synopsis

A noblewoman's surprising bequest puts three families from different social levels on a collision course.

Film Details

Also Known As
Howards End, Regeso a Howard, Retour a Howards End
MPAA Rating
Genre
Romance
Drama
Historical
Period
Adaptation
Release Date
1992
Distribution Company
ALLIANCE RELEASING/MERCHANT/IVORY PRODUCTIONS/SONY PICTURES CLASSICS/THE COHEN MEDIA GROUP (CMG)
Location
London, England, United Kingdom; Dartmouth, England, United Kingdom; South Devon, England, United Kingdom; Dorset, England, United Kingdom; Oxford, England, United Kingdom

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 22m

Synopsis

Class relations and changing times in Edwardian England are seen through the stories of a wealthy, conservative industrialist and his wife, a working¿class man and his mistress, and two cultured and emancipated sisters. Margaret Schlegel and her sister Helen become involved with two couples: a wealthy, conservative industrialist and his wife, and a working¿class man and his mistress. The interwoven fates and misfortunes of these three families and the diverging trajectories of the two sisters' lives are connected to the ownership of a beloved country home, Howards End. Based on the classic novel by E.M. Forster.

Crew

Geoffrey Alexander

Music Coordinator

Luciana Arrighi

Production Designer

Campbell Askew

Sound Editor

Jill Avery

Wardrobe Assistant

Peter Batten

Other

Jenny Beavan

Costume Designer

Chrissie Beveridge

Makeup

Jean Bourne

Continuity

Paul Bradley

Executive Producer

John Bright

Costume Designer

James Butler

Production Assistant

Simon Callow

Other

Joe Chate

Office Runner

Stephen Cornish

Wardrobe Supervisor

Paul Dawson

Assistant Editor

Andre Derain

Music

John Downes

Production Manager

Jeanne Ferber

Location Manager

Tommy Finch

Gaffer

E M Forster

Source Material (From Novel)

Celestia Fox

Casting

Tom Freeman

Assistant Editor

Joe Friedman

Location Scout

Michelle Gorchow

Associate Editor

Percy Grainger

Music

Keith Grant

Music

Sian Grigg

Hair

Oliver Harrison

Titles

Rawdon Hayne

Camera

John Hedges

Construction Manager

Michael Hedges

Carpenter

Robin Heinson

Other

Carol Hemming

Hairdresser

Flora Herbert

Production Assistant

Caroline Hill

Production Manager

Sue Honeybourne

Wardrobe Supervisor

Ben Howarth

Production Assistant

Malcolm Huse

Grip

Charlie Ixer

Props

Gary Ixer

Props

Sallie Jaye

Makeup Assistant

Ruth Prawer Jhabvala

Screenplay

Martin Jones

Soloist

Richard Jones

Other

Sunil Kirparam

Production Accountant

Fay Efrosini Lellios

Production Assistant

Dominic Lester

Sound Re-Recording Mixer

Michael Lind

Other

Paolo Mantini

Hair Assistant

Andrew Marcus

Editor

Roderick Marley

Camera Trainee

James Marsh

Associate Editor

Kathryn Martin

Assistant

Bettina Mccall

Assistant Sound Editor

Christian Mcwilliams

Location Assistant

Ismail Merchant

Producer

Andy Morris

Boom Operator

Sarah Morton

Dialogue Editor

Simon Moseley

Assistant Director

Chris Newman

Assistant Director

Robin O'donoghue

Sound Re-Recording Mixer

Nick O'hagan

Production Coordinator

Carl Oprey

Assistant Director

Tony Pierce-roberts

Director Of Photography

Tony Pierce-roberts

Dp/Cinematographer

Billy Pochetty

Best Boy

Jill Quertier

Production

Harry Rabinowitz

Music Conductor

John F Ralph

Art Director

Bill Richards

Other

Frances Richardson

Accounting Assistant

Richard Robbins

Music

Philip Robinson

Art Assistant

Don Rogers

Production Assistant

Derrick Santini

Photography

Len Serpant

Other

Emily Shapland

Production Assistant

Mike Shoring

Sound Recordist

Adrian Simmonds

Wardrobe Assistant

Robert Stewart

Music

Jeff Sullivan

Other

Peter Wallis

Props

Ian Whittaker

Set Decorator

Barry Wilkinson

Property Master

Simon Wilkinson

Props

Ann Wingate

Coproducer

Mike Yell

Production Accountant

Film Details

Also Known As
Howards End, Regeso a Howard, Retour a Howards End
MPAA Rating
Genre
Romance
Drama
Historical
Period
Adaptation
Release Date
1992
Distribution Company
ALLIANCE RELEASING/MERCHANT/IVORY PRODUCTIONS/SONY PICTURES CLASSICS/THE COHEN MEDIA GROUP (CMG)
Location
London, England, United Kingdom; Dartmouth, England, United Kingdom; South Devon, England, United Kingdom; Dorset, England, United Kingdom; Oxford, England, United Kingdom

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 22m

Award Wins

Best Actress

1992
Emma Thompson

Best Adapted Screenplay

1992

Best Art Direction

1992
Luciana Arrighi

Award Nominations

Best Cinematography

1992

Best Costume Design

1992
Jenny Beavan

Best Director

1992
James Ivory

Best Picture

1992

Best Score

1992

Best Supporting Actress

1992
Vanessa Redgrave

Articles

Howards End


Howards End (1992) was a landmark achievement for the celebrated team of director James Ivory, producer Ismail Merchant, and writer Ruth Prawer Jhabvala, all of whom earned Academy Award nominations for their elegant, eloquent adaptation of E.M. Forster's marvelous 1910 novel. The film was in the running for nine Oscars®, including Best Picture, and three of the contenders - Jhabvala's screenplay, Emma Thompson's lead performance, and the art direction and set decoration by Luciana Arrighi and Ian Whittaker - won well-deserved victories when the envelopes were opened. Audiences loved the movie too, and its luster hasn't dimmed in subsequent years.

Like the novel that inspired it, the film revolves around an issue that affects every aspect of English society, and a great many aspects of American society as well: social and economic class, which draws arbitrary lines between people based not on individual worth but on wealth, power, and prestige. The three Schlegel sisters - Margaret, Helen, and Tibby - belong to the upper middle class. They are comfortable but not rich: they rent rather than own a home, and their acquaintance with Continental culture, signaled by their family name and ability to speak German, brings few tangible benefits. Henry and Ruth Wilcox are much higher in the pecking order, belonging to the landed gentry and positively oozing money, influence, and real estate. Leonard Bast and his fiancée Jacky are near the opposite end of the spectrum, clinging to the meager comforts of the lower middle class and knowing that even these will never be entirely secure. Then as now, a lost job or unexpected crisis could bring hardships that more privileged people rarely have to think about, much less confront.

Two pivotal incidents drive the story. One involves wealthy Ruth Wilcox, who is growing weaker by the day from the illness that will soon take her life. Margaret Schlegel befriends her, going Christmas shopping with her and sharing quiet conversations about everyday affairs, such as the fact that the lease on the Schlegels' townhouse is expiring and the sisters are looking for a new place. Margaret is quite chipper about this, but it strikes Ruth as a sad situation. Lying on her deathbed, she impulsively writes a note leaving her family's ancestral estate, Howards End, to Margaret rather than her own husband. When she dies soon afterward, Henry and the grown Wilcox offspring receive this note and have a family conference, deciding to burn the message and pretend it never existed. Among the many consequences of this sneaky act, Henry feels a nagging guilt that eventually leads him to marry Margaret, who moves into Howards End after all, still with no idea that she herself should be the owner.

The other key event involves Leonard Bast, a mild-mannered bank clerk who likes to read and take dreamy walks through the countryside, partly to get away from Jacky, the culture-free girlfriend he has promised to marry. After a lecture one evening, scatterbrained Helen Schlegel wanders off with Leonard's umbrella, and when he visits her house to retrieve it, the sisters take a liking to him. Some time later, Henry Wilcox happens to mention that the bank where Leonard works is in very bad financial shape; the Schlegels contact Leonard immediately and tell him to find a new job with a more secure establishment. Leonard heeds their advice with horrible results, finding himself with no job at all to support himself and his new wife. Feeling responsible for their desperate condition, Helen brings Leonard and Jacky to a family wedding, where Jacky drunkenly spills the beans about an affair she had with Henry years earlier. Margaret forgives Henry for the affair and for keeping it secret, but when Helen shows up pregnant by Leonard a few months later, Henry is not so quick to absolve a woman of the same sins he himself has committed. The climax takes place at Howards End, where a tragic killing occurs amid high emotions, family resentments, and confusions arising from a vague realization that class-based conventions are gradually moving toward a new, less benighted era.

The plot of Howards End may sound complicated and the social issues may seem abstract, but the story is always crystal clear, and the sociological overtones are embodied so intimately by the characters that far from weakening the drama, they add to it by raising the stakes for all concerned. They remain important issues now, moreover; the gap between rich and poor, the double standard for sexuality, and old-fashioned materialism still cause plenty of trouble. Excellent acting also brings the film to life. Thompson's prizewinning portrayal of Margaret is so natural and understated that it scarcely seems like a performance at all. Helena Bonham Carter is equally convincing as the sometimes frazzled Helen, and Vanessa Redgrave is extraordinarily good as Ruth, who seems to fade away before your eyes. Among the men, Anthony Hopkins gives a strong yet subtle depiction of wealthy, hypocritical Henry that tops even his acclaimed work for Merchant Ivory in The Remains of the Day (1993) the following year. Samuel West as Leonard and James Wilby as Henry's pompous son are close to perfect. Ditto for Tony Pierce-Roberts's luminous cinematography and Richard Robbins's pulsing, energetic music.

Taking a fresh look at Howards End is a good way to remember the greatness of Merchant Ivory Productions, which Ivory and Merchant founded in 1961. It's ironic that even when the group was at its creative peak, from the 1970s through the early 1990s, moviegoers tended to forget how varied their movies are. For some, Merchant and Ivory were primarily the monarchs of literary adaptation, dedicated to novels by towering authors. This is true as far as it goes: Forster inspired Howards End and A Room with a View (1985) and Maurice (1987), while Henry James inspired The Europeans (1979) and The Bostonians (1984) and The Golden Bowl (2000), a novel everyone else thought was unfilmable. For others, Merchant Ivory was the outfit that made movies set in Merchant's native India, such as Bombay Talkie (1970) and Heat and Dust (1983). Still others saw the team as dignified chroniclers of modern life, sometimes focusing on bygone decades, as in The Wild Party (1975) and Quartet (1981), and sometimes on the present day, as in Roseland (1977) and Jane Austen in Manhattan (1980).

In fact, however, they did excellent work in all these areas, and even their adaptations ranged beyond the literary classics; one of their very greatest films, A Soldier's Daughter Never Cries (1998), is based on Kaylie Jones's autobiographical novel about growing up with author James Jones for a father. It's fitting that Merchant Ivory has been called the Wandering Company, since its interests wandered far and wide over the years. Howards End is one of the most exquisite stops they made during the journey.

Director: James Ivory
Producer: Ismail Merchant
Screenplay: Ruth Prawer Jhabvala; based on the novel by E.M. Forster
Cinematographer: Tony Pierce-Roberts
Film Editing: Andrew Marcus
Art Direction: John Ralph
Production Design: Luciana Arrighi
Music: Richard Robbins
With: Vanessa Redgrave (Ruth Wilcox), Helena Bonham Carter (Helen Schlegel), Joseph Bennett (Paul Wilcox), Emma Thompson (Margaret Schlegel), Prunella Scales (Aunt Juley), Adrian Ross Magenty (Tibby Schlegel), Jo Kendall (Annie), Anthony Hopkins (Henry J. Wilcox), James Wilby (Charles Wilcox), Jemma Redgrave (Evie Wilcox), Samuel West (Leonard Bast), Nicola Duffett (Jacky Bast)
C-140m.

by David Sterritt
Howards End

Howards End

Howards End (1992) was a landmark achievement for the celebrated team of director James Ivory, producer Ismail Merchant, and writer Ruth Prawer Jhabvala, all of whom earned Academy Award nominations for their elegant, eloquent adaptation of E.M. Forster's marvelous 1910 novel. The film was in the running for nine Oscars®, including Best Picture, and three of the contenders - Jhabvala's screenplay, Emma Thompson's lead performance, and the art direction and set decoration by Luciana Arrighi and Ian Whittaker - won well-deserved victories when the envelopes were opened. Audiences loved the movie too, and its luster hasn't dimmed in subsequent years. Like the novel that inspired it, the film revolves around an issue that affects every aspect of English society, and a great many aspects of American society as well: social and economic class, which draws arbitrary lines between people based not on individual worth but on wealth, power, and prestige. The three Schlegel sisters - Margaret, Helen, and Tibby - belong to the upper middle class. They are comfortable but not rich: they rent rather than own a home, and their acquaintance with Continental culture, signaled by their family name and ability to speak German, brings few tangible benefits. Henry and Ruth Wilcox are much higher in the pecking order, belonging to the landed gentry and positively oozing money, influence, and real estate. Leonard Bast and his fiancée Jacky are near the opposite end of the spectrum, clinging to the meager comforts of the lower middle class and knowing that even these will never be entirely secure. Then as now, a lost job or unexpected crisis could bring hardships that more privileged people rarely have to think about, much less confront. Two pivotal incidents drive the story. One involves wealthy Ruth Wilcox, who is growing weaker by the day from the illness that will soon take her life. Margaret Schlegel befriends her, going Christmas shopping with her and sharing quiet conversations about everyday affairs, such as the fact that the lease on the Schlegels' townhouse is expiring and the sisters are looking for a new place. Margaret is quite chipper about this, but it strikes Ruth as a sad situation. Lying on her deathbed, she impulsively writes a note leaving her family's ancestral estate, Howards End, to Margaret rather than her own husband. When she dies soon afterward, Henry and the grown Wilcox offspring receive this note and have a family conference, deciding to burn the message and pretend it never existed. Among the many consequences of this sneaky act, Henry feels a nagging guilt that eventually leads him to marry Margaret, who moves into Howards End after all, still with no idea that she herself should be the owner. The other key event involves Leonard Bast, a mild-mannered bank clerk who likes to read and take dreamy walks through the countryside, partly to get away from Jacky, the culture-free girlfriend he has promised to marry. After a lecture one evening, scatterbrained Helen Schlegel wanders off with Leonard's umbrella, and when he visits her house to retrieve it, the sisters take a liking to him. Some time later, Henry Wilcox happens to mention that the bank where Leonard works is in very bad financial shape; the Schlegels contact Leonard immediately and tell him to find a new job with a more secure establishment. Leonard heeds their advice with horrible results, finding himself with no job at all to support himself and his new wife. Feeling responsible for their desperate condition, Helen brings Leonard and Jacky to a family wedding, where Jacky drunkenly spills the beans about an affair she had with Henry years earlier. Margaret forgives Henry for the affair and for keeping it secret, but when Helen shows up pregnant by Leonard a few months later, Henry is not so quick to absolve a woman of the same sins he himself has committed. The climax takes place at Howards End, where a tragic killing occurs amid high emotions, family resentments, and confusions arising from a vague realization that class-based conventions are gradually moving toward a new, less benighted era. The plot of Howards End may sound complicated and the social issues may seem abstract, but the story is always crystal clear, and the sociological overtones are embodied so intimately by the characters that far from weakening the drama, they add to it by raising the stakes for all concerned. They remain important issues now, moreover; the gap between rich and poor, the double standard for sexuality, and old-fashioned materialism still cause plenty of trouble. Excellent acting also brings the film to life. Thompson's prizewinning portrayal of Margaret is so natural and understated that it scarcely seems like a performance at all. Helena Bonham Carter is equally convincing as the sometimes frazzled Helen, and Vanessa Redgrave is extraordinarily good as Ruth, who seems to fade away before your eyes. Among the men, Anthony Hopkins gives a strong yet subtle depiction of wealthy, hypocritical Henry that tops even his acclaimed work for Merchant Ivory in The Remains of the Day (1993) the following year. Samuel West as Leonard and James Wilby as Henry's pompous son are close to perfect. Ditto for Tony Pierce-Roberts's luminous cinematography and Richard Robbins's pulsing, energetic music. Taking a fresh look at Howards End is a good way to remember the greatness of Merchant Ivory Productions, which Ivory and Merchant founded in 1961. It's ironic that even when the group was at its creative peak, from the 1970s through the early 1990s, moviegoers tended to forget how varied their movies are. For some, Merchant and Ivory were primarily the monarchs of literary adaptation, dedicated to novels by towering authors. This is true as far as it goes: Forster inspired Howards End and A Room with a View (1985) and Maurice (1987), while Henry James inspired The Europeans (1979) and The Bostonians (1984) and The Golden Bowl (2000), a novel everyone else thought was unfilmable. For others, Merchant Ivory was the outfit that made movies set in Merchant's native India, such as Bombay Talkie (1970) and Heat and Dust (1983). Still others saw the team as dignified chroniclers of modern life, sometimes focusing on bygone decades, as in The Wild Party (1975) and Quartet (1981), and sometimes on the present day, as in Roseland (1977) and Jane Austen in Manhattan (1980). In fact, however, they did excellent work in all these areas, and even their adaptations ranged beyond the literary classics; one of their very greatest films, A Soldier's Daughter Never Cries (1998), is based on Kaylie Jones's autobiographical novel about growing up with author James Jones for a father. It's fitting that Merchant Ivory has been called the Wandering Company, since its interests wandered far and wide over the years. Howards End is one of the most exquisite stops they made during the journey. Director: James Ivory Producer: Ismail Merchant Screenplay: Ruth Prawer Jhabvala; based on the novel by E.M. Forster Cinematographer: Tony Pierce-Roberts Film Editing: Andrew Marcus Art Direction: John Ralph Production Design: Luciana Arrighi Music: Richard Robbins With: Vanessa Redgrave (Ruth Wilcox), Helena Bonham Carter (Helen Schlegel), Joseph Bennett (Paul Wilcox), Emma Thompson (Margaret Schlegel), Prunella Scales (Aunt Juley), Adrian Ross Magenty (Tibby Schlegel), Jo Kendall (Annie), Anthony Hopkins (Henry J. Wilcox), James Wilby (Charles Wilcox), Jemma Redgrave (Evie Wilcox), Samuel West (Leonard Bast), Nicola Duffett (Jacky Bast) C-140m. by David Sterritt

Howards End on DVD


For the storied production team of producer Ismail Merchant and director James Ivory, their adaptation of E.M. Forster's Edwardian novel Howards End (1992) continues to represent a high watermark in their longtime collaboration. While having many a lush period piece examining class struggle in their prior portfolio, this film found the broadest mass acceptance for their work to date, and ultimately garnered three Academy Awards out of nine total nominations. Home Vision Entertainment has recently re-released Howards End to DVD in a two-disc special edition as part of their comprehensive series of Merchant/Ivory titles, and their efforts in presenting the film and complementing it with worthwhile extras will not disappoint.

The narrative, set in early 1900's Britain, tracks the path of the Schlegels, a small family of upper middle-class London intellectuals, and its intersection with that of the wealthy Wilcox clan. The families' acquaintance weathers a social gaffe when the headstrong young Helen Schlegel (Helena Bonham Carter) reads more into a romantic summertime dalliance with Paul Wilcox (Joseph Bennett) than was intended. Matters get smoothed over the following season when the Wilcoxes take an apartment near the Schlegels' soon-to-be-foreclosed home, and Paul's sickly, ethereal mother Ruth (Vanessa Redgrave) forges a friendship with Helen's effervescent older sister Margaret (Emma Thompson).

Ruth dies shortly thereafter, and the bond that she so swiftly developed with Margaret apparently ran deep. Much to the appalled chagrin of her children, their mother left a handwritten document leaving Margaret their titular country estate. The family patriarch, the stuffy but shrewd shipping tycoon Henry (Anthony Hopkins), determines to carefully feel Miss Schlegel out regarding her knowledge of the bequest, and unexpectedly finds himself taken by her charm over the weeks that ensue.

The other prong of the drama goes to the relationship that the Schlegels fortuitously develop with the intelligent and aesthetic but dirt-poor clerk Leonard Bast (Samuel West). Upon hearing an off-handed remark from Henry regarding the financial straits of Bast's employer, Helen entreats the young man to quit and find work elsewhere. His acquiescence proves disastrous once his former company weathers its difficulties, and he's unable to land a new job. The outraged Helen's demands that Henry makes things right drives all three families into tragic conflict.

The virtues of Howards End are many, beginning with the efforts of the cast. Thompson deservedly took home that year's Oscar® for Best Actress, as she memorably conveyed Margaret's exuberant intelligence and fundamental decency. Hopkins is no less memorable in depicting how the hard edges of the imperious Henry gradually soften from her influence. Bonham Carter registers well as Helen's advocacy for Bast slides into dangerous zeal, Redgrave wrests a great deal from a limited amount of screen time as the doomed but serene Ruth. Note also has to be given James Wilby and Jemma Redgrave as the priggish balance of the Wilcox brood, and Nicola Duffett as Bast's crass ex-shopgirl wife.

The opulence with which Howards End recreates its sense of time and place belies the film's $8 million budget, and all credit is due to production designers Luciana Arrighi for her Academy Award-winning work. The film's final Oscar went to Merchant and Ivory's reliable scenarist, Ruth Prawer Jhabvala, whose adaptation of Forster's prose for the screen was both faithful in tone and surprisingly complete. Criterion's mastering job for the new DVD release, presented in the original 2:35 theatrical aspect ratio, does justice to the vivid color cinematography of Tony Pierce-Roberts.

The robust selection of supplemental materials put together for the special edition leads off with the new 42-minute documentary Building Howards End. While Home Vision Entertainment has done a superlative job across the board with the new documentary materials provided with its Merchant/Ivory line, this effort raises the bar, providing insightful reflections from the producer and director as well as Bonham Carter and Arrighi. Arrighi and costume designer Jenny Beavan take center stage in the 9-minute Designing Howards End, exploring their impressive handiwork for the production. Merchant/Ivory completists should appreciate The Wandering Company, a 49-minute docu made during the production of A Room With A View (1992) that recaps the first 20 years of the creative partnership. A five-minute featurette from the time of Howards End's release and a theatrical trailer complete the extras package.

For more information about Howards End, visit Home Vision Entertainment. To order Howards End, go to TCM Shopping.

by Jay S. Steinberg

Howards End on DVD

For the storied production team of producer Ismail Merchant and director James Ivory, their adaptation of E.M. Forster's Edwardian novel Howards End (1992) continues to represent a high watermark in their longtime collaboration. While having many a lush period piece examining class struggle in their prior portfolio, this film found the broadest mass acceptance for their work to date, and ultimately garnered three Academy Awards out of nine total nominations. Home Vision Entertainment has recently re-released Howards End to DVD in a two-disc special edition as part of their comprehensive series of Merchant/Ivory titles, and their efforts in presenting the film and complementing it with worthwhile extras will not disappoint. The narrative, set in early 1900's Britain, tracks the path of the Schlegels, a small family of upper middle-class London intellectuals, and its intersection with that of the wealthy Wilcox clan. The families' acquaintance weathers a social gaffe when the headstrong young Helen Schlegel (Helena Bonham Carter) reads more into a romantic summertime dalliance with Paul Wilcox (Joseph Bennett) than was intended. Matters get smoothed over the following season when the Wilcoxes take an apartment near the Schlegels' soon-to-be-foreclosed home, and Paul's sickly, ethereal mother Ruth (Vanessa Redgrave) forges a friendship with Helen's effervescent older sister Margaret (Emma Thompson). Ruth dies shortly thereafter, and the bond that she so swiftly developed with Margaret apparently ran deep. Much to the appalled chagrin of her children, their mother left a handwritten document leaving Margaret their titular country estate. The family patriarch, the stuffy but shrewd shipping tycoon Henry (Anthony Hopkins), determines to carefully feel Miss Schlegel out regarding her knowledge of the bequest, and unexpectedly finds himself taken by her charm over the weeks that ensue. The other prong of the drama goes to the relationship that the Schlegels fortuitously develop with the intelligent and aesthetic but dirt-poor clerk Leonard Bast (Samuel West). Upon hearing an off-handed remark from Henry regarding the financial straits of Bast's employer, Helen entreats the young man to quit and find work elsewhere. His acquiescence proves disastrous once his former company weathers its difficulties, and he's unable to land a new job. The outraged Helen's demands that Henry makes things right drives all three families into tragic conflict. The virtues of Howards End are many, beginning with the efforts of the cast. Thompson deservedly took home that year's Oscar® for Best Actress, as she memorably conveyed Margaret's exuberant intelligence and fundamental decency. Hopkins is no less memorable in depicting how the hard edges of the imperious Henry gradually soften from her influence. Bonham Carter registers well as Helen's advocacy for Bast slides into dangerous zeal, Redgrave wrests a great deal from a limited amount of screen time as the doomed but serene Ruth. Note also has to be given James Wilby and Jemma Redgrave as the priggish balance of the Wilcox brood, and Nicola Duffett as Bast's crass ex-shopgirl wife. The opulence with which Howards End recreates its sense of time and place belies the film's $8 million budget, and all credit is due to production designers Luciana Arrighi for her Academy Award-winning work. The film's final Oscar went to Merchant and Ivory's reliable scenarist, Ruth Prawer Jhabvala, whose adaptation of Forster's prose for the screen was both faithful in tone and surprisingly complete. Criterion's mastering job for the new DVD release, presented in the original 2:35 theatrical aspect ratio, does justice to the vivid color cinematography of Tony Pierce-Roberts. The robust selection of supplemental materials put together for the special edition leads off with the new 42-minute documentary Building Howards End. While Home Vision Entertainment has done a superlative job across the board with the new documentary materials provided with its Merchant/Ivory line, this effort raises the bar, providing insightful reflections from the producer and director as well as Bonham Carter and Arrighi. Arrighi and costume designer Jenny Beavan take center stage in the 9-minute Designing Howards End, exploring their impressive handiwork for the production. Merchant/Ivory completists should appreciate The Wandering Company, a 49-minute docu made during the production of A Room With A View (1992) that recaps the first 20 years of the creative partnership. A five-minute featurette from the time of Howards End's release and a theatrical trailer complete the extras package. For more information about Howards End, visit Home Vision Entertainment. To order Howards End, go to TCM Shopping. by Jay S. Steinberg

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Emma Thompson was voted best actress by the Boston Society of Film Critics (1992).

Emma Thompson was voted best actress by the Los Angeles Film Critics Association (1992).

Emma Thompson was voted best actress by the National Society of Film Critics (1992).

Emma Thompson was voted best actress by the New York Film Critics Circle (1992).

Ismail Merchant was nominated for the 1992 Golden Laurel Award by the Producers Guild of America.

James Ivory was nominated for the Directors Guild of America's 1992 Outstanding Directorial Achievement Award.

Voted Best Picture of the Year (1992) by the National Board of Review. Also cited for Best Director and Best Actress (Emma Thompson).

Winner of the 45th Anniversary Prize at the 1992 Cannes Film Festival.

Released in United States Spring March 13, 1992

Released in United States April 15, 1992

Wide Release in United States February 19, 1993

Limited re-release in United States August 26, 2016

Released in United States on Video June 2, 1993

Released in United States February 1992

Released in United States September 1996

Released in United States 2011

Shown at the Floating Film Festival on the M.S. New Amsterdam (world premiere) February 1-8, 1992.

Completed shooting July 7, 1991.

Began shooting April 22, 1991.

Limited release in Australia May 21, 1992.

Limited release in Canada May 15, 1992.

Wide release in Canada May 22, 1992.

Expanded released in USA May 22, 1992.

Released in United States Spring March 13, 1992

Released in United States April 15, 1992 (Los Angeles)

Wide Release in United States February 19, 1993

Limited re-release in United States August 26, 2016 (New York)

Released in United States on Video June 2, 1993

Released in United States February 1992 (Shown at the Floating Film Festival on the M.S. New Amsterdam (world premiere) February 1-8, 1992.)

Released in United States September 1996 (Shown in New York City (Anthology Film Archives) as part of program "Best of the Indies" September 5-15, 1996.)

Released in United States 2011 (20 Years of Art Cinema: A Tribute to Sony Pictures Classics)