The Honeymoon's Over


1h 10m 1939

Film Details

Also Known As
Six Cylinder Love, The Simple Life
Release Date
Dec 15, 1939
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp.
Distribution Company
Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp.
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the play Six-Cylinder Love by William Anthony McGuire (New York, 25 Aug 1921).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 10m
Film Length
6,270ft (8 reels)

Synopsis

Avery Butterfield, the prissy office manager of the J. P. Walker Advertising Co., is furious when copywriters Donald Todd and Betty Stewart are late, but they are forgiven by Walker when they reveal that they were just married. Donald confides to Walker that they have saved just enough money for a house and furniture, and Walker assures him that he is in line for a promotion if he continues his good work. The newlyweds are soon happily tending to their home, while their next-door neighbors, Roger and Molly Burton, are experiencing some difficulties. Faced with enormous debts, the Burtons are forced to tell their "friends," who are actually freeloading partygoers, that they are giving up all luxuries, including them. The ne'er-do-well group, which includes tennis player Pat Shields, socialite Peggy Ryder, alcoholic Colonel Shelby and Charlie and Geraldine Winslow, disappear as quickly as the alcohol does, and slick salesman Tom Donroy attempts to sell the Burtons' car to the Todds. He escorts them to the country club, where they are taken in by the vivacious freeloaders. Using their last savings, the Todds buy the car and join the country club. The Todds spend their nights partying with the merrymakers, until finally the bills pour in and Donald grows worried. He tries to discuss it with Betty, but she is too wrapped up in an upcoming tennis tournament, in which she will play with Pat, to listen. Donald is counting on receiving his promised promotion, but when he is passed over in favor of a more diligent worker, he realizes that his nightlife is taking its toll. Donald returns home to find the gang prepared to drive with Betty to the tournament, and despite Donald's pleas for her to remain, Betty insists on going. The next evening, Betty has misgivings about being away for another night, and she leaves, accompanied by Pat. Pat tries to kiss her while she is driving, and she gets into an accident. Betty confesses to Donald that she scratched the car, and although the couple reconcile, everything does not look so rosy the next day, when Donald is visited by D. W. O'Connor, the attorney for the other people involved in the accident. After O'Connor threatens to have Betty associated with the carousing Pat in a lawsuit, Donald agrees to settle the claim for $7,500. His attorney advises Donald to go to Walker for help, but Donald is too ashamed, and after getting a mortgage on the house, he embezzles the $4,000 he still needs. Walker fires Donald and gives him sixty days to repay the money or else he will go to jail. Donald tells Pat and his gang of parasites to move on to another sucker, and he explains the trouble they are in to Betty. Betty immediately agrees to stick by her husband, and after they sell the house, she goes to work at Horace Kellogg's department store. One day, Betty meets a thin man who tells her about his invention, SlenderFoam, which causes one to lose weight while taking a bath. The man agrees to split the profits with Betty if she can get a sponsor for the product, and she approaches Kellogg directly. After Betty bathes at his house and loses weight, Kellogg agrees to sponsor SlenderFoam. Donald persuades him to give an exclusive advertising contract for the foam to Walker, and Walker rehires Donald and gives him the promotion. Walker also hires back Betty, but she tells him that she will not be able to start work until January, after the arrival of the new member of the Todd family.

Film Details

Also Known As
Six Cylinder Love, The Simple Life
Release Date
Dec 15, 1939
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp.
Distribution Company
Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp.
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the play Six-Cylinder Love by William Anthony McGuire (New York, 25 Aug 1921).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 10m
Film Length
6,270ft (8 reels)

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

The working titles of this film were Six Cylinder Love and The Simple Life. According to Hollywood Reporter news items, director William Beaudine fell ill the day after filming began and was replaced by Eugene Forde. Hollywood Reporter production charts include Chick Chandler in the cast, but his participation in the completed film is doubtful. According to information in the Twentieth Century-Fox Records of the Legal Department at the UCLA Theater Arts Library, Barnett Parker was originally signed for the role of "Avery Butterfield," and the country club and tennis scenes were filmed at the West Side Tennis Club in Los Angeles, California. Fox first filmed William Anthony McGuire's play in 1923 as Six Cylinder Love, which was directed by Elmer Clifton and starred Ernest Truex and Florence Eldrige (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1921-30; F2.5123). Fox produced another version entitled Six Cylinder Love in 1931 (see below).