Honeychile


1h 29m 1951

Film Details

Release Date
Oct 20, 1951
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Republic Pictures Corp.
Distribution Company
Republic Pictures Corp.
Country
United States
Location
Bishop, California, United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 29m

Synopsis

After the recording company for which he works finishes recording "Honeychile," a new single by well-known composer Marvin McKay, Eddie Price and his boss, Al Moore, discover that due to a mixup they do not own the rights to the song, which was actually composed by Wyoming farmer Judy Canova. Eddie is immediately dispatched to Wyoming to pay Judy for the song, but upon arriving, discovers that she has dedicated it to her fiance, Joe Boyd, and does not want to sell it for any price. By phone, Moore encourages Eddie to romance Judy to get the song, but although flattered, she remains loyal to Joe. At a bar, where he is drowning his sorrows, Eddie encounters his old friend, actress Betty Loring, and her manager, Chick Lester. While telling Betty of his dilemma, Eddie conceives of a way to use the attractive Betty to convince Judy to sign over the rights to her song. Meanwhile, Judy considers pulling out of a Frontier Day wagon race because she always wins, which makes Joe extremely angry. Judy's young niece Effie suggests that Judy participate, but purposely lose the race in order to keep Joe, and Judy agrees that this would be a good idea. Innocently, Effie and her brother Larry reveal the plot to the local blacksmith, who in turn discloses it to Joe. Joe is persuaded to bet on himself in the race and, convinced he will make a killing, "borrows" $5,000 from the cattlemen's fund. Later, Eddie contrives for Betty to be rescued by Joe from a runaway wagon. Typically, Judy reaches Betty first, but the susceptible Joe leaves his horse with Judy and drives Betty back to town. A bit jealous of the "yaller-haired woman," Judy dolls herself up. Meanwhile, Eddie proceeds with his plan. He encourages Chick to offer Joe the leading man's part in his new play. While Joe and Betty rehearse a scene, specially written by Eddie, Eddie makes sure that Judy overhears what appears to be Joe telling Betty that he loves her, not Judy. His plan backfires, however, when Judy vows that no one will ever sing her song again. That night, Eddie drives through the rain to tell Judy that he will be out of a job unless he gets the song. Judy then agrees to sell it, and her generous response causes Eddie to confess his machinations. Judy is delighted to know that Joe still loves her. Before she can sign the papers, "Honeychile" is performed over the radio, and everyone in town recognizes it as Judy's composition. Meanwhile, Moore flies to Wyoming to meet Judy. He tells her that they accidentally credited another composer for her song and explains that it would be too embarrassing to change the credit now, but offers her $5,000 as compensation. Judy refuses to compromise, but when Joe reveals that he stands to lose the same amount of money if he does not win the wagon race, Judy changes her mind. To save Joe from jail, she accepts Moore's conditions, with the result that the townspeople believe she lied about writing the song and shun her. When the race begins, her partner refuses to ride with her, and a terrified Eddie agrees to be her new partner. She then presents the check to Joe, who promises to pay her back when he wins the race. When Judy replies that he will not win, she is handed a note, but the race starts before she can read it. After a hard-fought race, Judy is about to win when Eddie reads the note and learns that Effie and Larry have been kidnapped. Nonetheless, Judy wins the race and then proceeds to rescue her niece and nephew. Later, she is honored with the title "Queen of the Cowgirls," and Marvin McKay arrives to apologize to Judy and give her full credit for writing the song. Nearby, Joe is waiting with an armful of flowers.

Film Details

Release Date
Oct 20, 1951
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Republic Pictures Corp.
Distribution Company
Republic Pictures Corp.
Country
United States
Location
Bishop, California, United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 29m

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

According to Hollywood Reporter news items, William Frawley was signed for a featured role, and his name is listed in Hollywood Reporter production charts, but he did not appear in the released film. Honeychile was the first Republic picture to be made in a new three color version of Republic's Trucolor process. This was Judy Canova's first picture since Singin' in the Corn (1946). According to a December 1950 Los Angeles Times news item, she spent the intervening years concentrating on radio and personal performances. An Hollywood Reporter news item states that the film marked the return of actor Leonid Kinskey to pictures after a two-year absence, but he had previously appeared in the 1950 film Nancy Goes to Rio. Some scenes were shot on location in Bishop, CA.