Henry Aldrich Gets Glamour


1h 12m 1943

Film Details

Also Known As
Private Henry Aldrich
Release Date
Jan 1943
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Paramount Pictures, Inc.
Distribution Company
Paramount Pictures, Inc.
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on characters created by Clifford Goldsmith.

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 12m
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
6,453ft (8 reels)

Synopsis

Centerville teenager Henry Aldrich enters an essay contest and wins a date in Hollywood with glamorous "sarong" movie star, Hilary Dane. Henry's father accompanies him on the trip, but is not present when he meets Hilary at the Paramount studios. Hilary learns that she is not being considered for the lead in the film version of Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet because at age twenty-three, she is considered too old and sophisticated for the role. She argues the point with the film's producer during her lunch date with Henry, and the teen actually speaks with her. Just before she leaves, Hilary poses for a publicity shot with Henry, and because he trips as he stands near her, he appears to be kissing Hilary in the photograph. The picture is published in movie magazines across the country, and upon Henry's return, a huge crowd gathers at the Centerville train station to meet him. Henry admits only to his best friend, Dizzy Stevens, that nothing happened between him and Hilary, but enjoys his new reputation as a romantic "wolf." Henry ignores his longtime girl friend, Phyllis Michael, to date the high school's glamour girl, Virginia Lowry, who previously snubbed him. Virginia misinterprets Henry's clumsy manners, and when his car breaks down and they do not return from their date until after their curfew, malicious gossip spreads throughout town. Henry's father, attorney Sam Aldrich, has been campaigning for the post of welfare commissioner, and the gossip about Henry spurs the withdrawal of his public support. Although the high school girls are still interested in Henry, he becomes despondent, and refuses to ask anyone to the country club dance. When Hilary is booked for a local appearance, everyone assumes Henry is planning to bring her to the dance. Henry musters his courage and invites Hilary by phone, although she does not remember who he is until after she hangs up. Henry hopes that she will stand him up, and thereby restore his family's reputation. However, Hilary's press agent boyfriend Steve convinces her to go to Centerville and pretend that she has a romantic relationship with Henry as a ploy to prove that she is still youthful enough to play "Juliet." The ruse works for Hilary, who gets new attention from her studio, but works against Henry and his father, who face mounting disapproval from the town. Dizzy secretly overhears Steve and Hilary discussing the scheme, and he and Henry plot to end the situation once and for all. As part of their plan, Henry proposes marriage to Hilary at the country club dance, assuming that she will reject him. Although her better instincts tell her to discontinue the ruse to avoid hurting Henry, Steve convinces her to accept the proposal until she is actually signed for Romeo and Juliet . Hilary finally opposes Steve after seeing Henry sink into a depression and realizes that Steve has only been promoting her for his own self-interest. Hilary makes a heartfelt public apology, which clears Henry of all suspicion and restores his family's dignity.

Film Details

Also Known As
Private Henry Aldrich
Release Date
Jan 1943
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Paramount Pictures, Inc.
Distribution Company
Paramount Pictures, Inc.
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on characters created by Clifford Goldsmith.

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 12m
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
6,453ft (8 reels)

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

The working title of this film was Private Henry Aldrich. The opening screen credits read "The Aldrich Family in Henry Aldrich Gets Glamour." The picture marked Gail Russell's feature film debut. For additional information on the series, consult the Series Index and for Life With Henry.