Hello, Everybody!


1h 16m 1933

Brief Synopsis

The setting is a farm. Kate Smith and Sally Blane play sisters; assorted relatives live with the sisters, but everyone at home, and in the whole town, depends on Kate to hold everything together. The power company wants to build a dam which will require flooding many of the farms; Kate is holding out; if Kate sells, everyone else will sell; if Kate refuses, the rest of the town will refuse as well. Randolph Scott meets Kate's beautiful sister, Sally Blane, at a dance. Randolph Scott, as it turns out, is an agent for the power company. Kate thinks he's just using Sally; Sally believes that he truly likes her. Randolph comes to the farm and appears to woo Kate. Kate remains unconvinced about selling out, but falls for Randolph.

Film Details

Also Known As
Queen of the Air
Release Date
Feb 17, 1933
Premiere Information
New York opening: week of 27 Jan 1933
Production Company
Paramount Productions, Inc.
Distribution Company
Paramount Productions, Inc.
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 16m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.33 : 1
Film Length
7 reels

Synopsis

The Smiths' farm is threatened when Mr. Marshall of the General Power and Water Company tries to force the farmers of Walasco County to sell their water rights to him. Hunt Blake, an envoy for the company, falls quickly in love with Lily Smith while trying to convince her sister Kate to cooperate with Marshall. After Hunt proposes to Lily, he quits his job with the power company. As he and Lily pack to move to San Francisco, Jed, who has worked on the farm for thirty-two years, convinces Hunt to stay and help Kate fight the company. When Marshall hosts a town social to be broadcast on the radio, Kate sings "Out in the Great Open Spaces" and is heard on the radio for the first time. Later, after Kate leaves the social to check on her little brother and sister, the townspeople think she is boycotting the meeting and walk out in support of the farmers. Next, Kate gets an offer from Ted Collins of the Nationwide Broadcasting System to come to New York. Kate refuses to leave the farm until the farmers lose their case in lower court and the bank threatens to take their house. When Kate opens the Bible and finds the words "sing many songs," she leaves for New York. By the time her case reaches Superior Court, Kate is a national sensation and is able to pay all legal fees. When the court again decides against the farmers, Kate leaves New York. Mr. Lindle, an engineer for the company, then reveals that the dam could be built around the farmers' lands if Marshall were willing to spend more money. The farmers, meanwhile, stage a riot in front of Marshall's office, demanding a meeting with him. The sheriff arrests Marshall for inciting a riot just as Kate arrives and offers to pay half of the $200,000 needed to reroute the dam's pipeline. Kate then gets a new radio contract.

Film Details

Also Known As
Queen of the Air
Release Date
Feb 17, 1933
Premiere Information
New York opening: week of 27 Jan 1933
Production Company
Paramount Productions, Inc.
Distribution Company
Paramount Productions, Inc.
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 16m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.33 : 1
Film Length
7 reels

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

This film's working title was Queen of the Air. The title of Fannie Hurst's original story was "Nice Girl." Variety incorrectly credits William Davidson with the part of Mr. Parker and calls George Barbier's character "Mr. Blair." The New York Times review credits Irving Bacon with the part of "Joe," while the Motion Picture Herald review lists Jack Pennick as "Joe." Ted Collins was Smith's real-life manager. As the film's opening credits roll, Kate Smith sings "When the Moon Comes Over the Mountain," which was her radio signature song. In the New York nightclub scene, Smith performs her famous "hotcha" dance. A montage within the film, which shows Kate Smith's rise to fame, includes RKO marquees.