The Hell Cat


1h 10m 1934

Film Details

Release Date
Jun 16, 1934
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Columbia Pictures Corp.
Distribution Company
Columbia Pictures Corp.
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 10m
Film Length
7 reels

Synopsis

While ace reporter Dan P. Collins is preparing an exposé that will reveal a local gambling ring led by Joe Morgan, his editor assigns him to cover the latest escapade of Geraldine Sloane, a spoiled spitfire who has punched an admirer in the jaw. Dan and his photographer, Snapper Dugan, arrive at Geraldine's house to interview her, only to be assaulted by the girl. When Dan takes revenge on her by returning the slap in front of her father, she decides to teach him a lesson through a practical joke. Disguised in a blonde wig, Geraldine poses as the niece of Pauline McCoy, who also dislikes Dan, and obtains a job at his newspaper. Dan, unaware of the ruse, falls in love with the new blonde at the newspaper. After escaping capture by the gamblers, Dan asks Geraldine to join him on the gambling yacht for a final raid. Geraldine, whose own yacht is docked at the harbor, agrees to accompany him as she plans to use the opportunity to have her crew humiliate him. Soon after Dan and Geraldine arrive at the docks, Geraldine sneaks onto her yacht, removes her disguise and screams for help. At the same time that Dan discovers Geraldine's true identity, the yacht is seized by the gamblers, who have hidden a cargo of smuggled Chinese girls on board. Dan and Geraldine are rescued by the Coast Guard, and after Dan sends the story to his newspaper, Geraldine takes him out to dinner.

Film Details

Release Date
Jun 16, 1934
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Columbia Pictures Corp.
Distribution Company
Columbia Pictures Corp.
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 10m
Film Length
7 reels

Articles

TCM Remembers - Ann Sothern


Actress Ann Sothern passed away on March 15th at the age of 89. Her film career spanned sixty years and included a Best Supporting Actress Oscar nomination for The Whales of August (1987) and several Emmy nominations for her roles in the TV shows Private Secretary (1953) and The Ann Sothern Show (1958). Sothern was born as Harriette Lake in North Dakota. She made her first film appearance in 1927 in small roles (so small, in fact, that some sources omit any films before 1929) before deciding to work on Broadway instead. Shortly afterwards she signed with Columbia Pictures where studio head Harry Cohn insisted she change her name because there were already too many actors with the last name of Lake. So "Ann" came from her mother's name Annette and "Sothern" from Shakespearean actor E.H. Sothern. For most of the 1930s she appeared in light comedies working with Eddie Cantor, Maurice Chevalier, Mickey Rooney and Fredric March. However, it wasn't until she switched to MGM (after a brief period with RKO) and made the film Maisie (1939) that Sothern hit pay dirt. It proved enormously popular and led to a series of nine more films through 1947 when she moved into dramas and musicals. During the 50s, Sothern made a mark with her TV series but returned to mostly second tier movies in the 1960s and 1970s. Finally she earned an Oscar nomination for her work in 1987's The Whales of August (in which, incidentally, her daughter Tisha Sterling played her at an earlier age). Turner Classic Movies plans to host a retrospective film tribute to her in July. Check back for details in June.
Tcm Remembers - Ann Sothern

TCM Remembers - Ann Sothern

Actress Ann Sothern passed away on March 15th at the age of 89. Her film career spanned sixty years and included a Best Supporting Actress Oscar nomination for The Whales of August (1987) and several Emmy nominations for her roles in the TV shows Private Secretary (1953) and The Ann Sothern Show (1958). Sothern was born as Harriette Lake in North Dakota. She made her first film appearance in 1927 in small roles (so small, in fact, that some sources omit any films before 1929) before deciding to work on Broadway instead. Shortly afterwards she signed with Columbia Pictures where studio head Harry Cohn insisted she change her name because there were already too many actors with the last name of Lake. So "Ann" came from her mother's name Annette and "Sothern" from Shakespearean actor E.H. Sothern. For most of the 1930s she appeared in light comedies working with Eddie Cantor, Maurice Chevalier, Mickey Rooney and Fredric March. However, it wasn't until she switched to MGM (after a brief period with RKO) and made the film Maisie (1939) that Sothern hit pay dirt. It proved enormously popular and led to a series of nine more films through 1947 when she moved into dramas and musicals. During the 50s, Sothern made a mark with her TV series but returned to mostly second tier movies in the 1960s and 1970s. Finally she earned an Oscar nomination for her work in 1987's The Whales of August (in which, incidentally, her daughter Tisha Sterling played her at an earlier age). Turner Classic Movies plans to host a retrospective film tribute to her in July. Check back for details in June.

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