Heartbreak Ridge


2h 10m 1986

Brief Synopsis

Sergeant Thomas Highway is an old-fashioned Marine Corps sergeant who is out of step with the new-fashioned military and returns to his old outfit as a gunnery sergeant, where he runs afoul of 1980s-style superior officers to whom the words "Gung Ho" are foolish anachronisms. But through his tough tutelage, Highway's lackadaisical platoon is whipped into a first-rate fighting machine, favoring teamwork over such New Age concepts as "self-fulfillment." Finally, the men prove their mettle during the invasion of Grenada.

Film Details

Also Known As
El sargento de hierro, maître de guerre
MPAA Rating
R
Genre
Action
Drama
War
Release Date
1986
Production Company
Jay Weston Productions; Joseph Geisinger; Malpaso Productions; Pacific Title & Art Studio; Panavision, Ltd.; Tony's Food Service; Warner Bros. Pictures
Distribution Company
Thirteen Distributing Company; Thirteen Distributing Company; Warner Bros. Home Entertainment Group; Warner Bros. Pictures International
Location
San Diego, California, USA; Los Angeles, California, USA; Camp Pendleton, California, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 10m

Synopsis

Sergeant Thomas Highway is an old-fashioned Marine Corps sergeant who is out of step with the new-fashioned military and returns to his old outfit as a gunnery sergeant, where he runs afoul of 1980s-style superior officers to whom the words "Gung Ho" are foolish anachronisms. But through his tough tutelage, Highway's lackadaisical platoon is whipped into a first-rate fighting machine, favoring teamwork over such New Age concepts as "self-fulfillment." Finally, the men prove their mettle during the invasion of Grenada.

Crew

Edward Aiona

Property Master

Dick Alexander

Sound Rerecording Mixer

Darryl Athons

Wardrobe (Men)

Ed Ayer

Bestboy

Kirk E Bales

Dolly Grip

Marco Barla

Unit Publicist

Donah Bassett

Negative Cutter

Robert R. Benton

Set Decorator

Kathryn Blondell

Hairstyles

Neil Burrow

Sound Editor

Scott Burrow

Sound Editor

Sammy Cahn

Song ("How Much I Care")

James Carabatsos

Screenwriter

Edward C Carfagno

Production Designer

Tom Case

Makeup

Michael Chevalier

Additional Camera Operator

Michael Cipriano

Assistant Editor

Joel Cox

Editor

Hal David

Song ("Sea Of Heartbreak")

Keith Dillin

Transportation Coordinator

Teri E. Dorman

Sound Editor

Clint Eastwood

Producer

Clint Eastwood

Song ("How Much I Care")

Jay Engel

Adr Editor

Sammy Fain

Songs ("Secret Love" "A Very Special Love")

Dan Falkengren

2nd Grip

Buzz Feitshans

Camera Assistant 2nd Unit (2nd Unit)

Robert Fernandez

Music Recording; Music Scoring Mixer

Les Fresholtz

Sound Rerecording Mixer

Jack Garsha

Color Timer

Chuck Gaspar

Special Effects

Joseph Geisinger

Cable Operator

Christopher George

Camera Assistant

Jeff Gershman

Camera Assistant 2nd Unit (2nd Unit)

Don Gibson

Song Performer ("Sea Of Heartbreak")

Dee Dee Goetz

Sound Editor Assistant

Christopher Gorman

Casting Assistant

Jack Grant

Transportation Captain

Jack N Green

Director Of Photography

Paul Hampton

Song ("Sea Of Heartbreak")

Donald Harris

Music Editor

Ronald R Harris

Adr Mixer

Robert Henderson

Sound Editor Supervisor

Larry Hezzelwood

Camera Assistant 2nd Unit (2nd Unit)

Jill Hollier

Song Performer ("Secret Love" "A Very Special Love" "How Much I Care")

Deborah Hopper

Wardrobe (Women)

D Michael Horton

Sound Editor

Judy Hoyt

Assistant (To Producers)

Kelly Hudson

Other

Phyllis Huffman

Casting Executive

L Dean Jones

2nd Assistant Director

Linda Sony Kinney

Other

Cindy Kurland

Camera Assistant

Bruce Lacey

Sound Editor

Cynthia Lasher

Other

Michael Looney

2nd Assistant Director

Fritz Manes

Unit Production Manager

Fritz Manes

Executive Producer

Michael Maurer

Assistant (To Producers)

Michael Maurer

Auditor

Paul Moen

1st Assistant Director

Alan Robert Murray

Sound Editor Supervisor

Michael A. Muscarella

Construction Coordinator

Desmond Nakano

Song ("I Love You, But I Ain'T Stupid")

Lloyd Nelson

Script Supervisor

William Nelson

Sound Mixer

Lennie Niehaus

Music

Lennie Niehaus

Music Conductor

Richard L Oswald

Sound Editor

Vern Poore

Sound Rerecording Mixer

Marcia Reed

Stills

Doug Ryan

Additional Camera Operator

Charlie Saldana

Key Grip

Robert Sessa

Set Designer

Stephen St John

Camera Operator

Marc Staton

Camera Assistant

Baird Steptoe

Camera Assistant

Tom Stern

Gaffer

Jules Strasser

Boom Operator

Wayne Van Horn

Stunt Coordinator

Mario Van Peebles

Song Performer ("Bionic Marine" "I Love You, But I Ain'T Stupid" "Recon Rap")

Mario Van Peebles

Songs

Brooke H Ward

Sound Editor Assistant

Paul Webster

Songs ("Secret Love" "A Very Special Love")

Glenn T Wright

Costume Supervisor

Film Details

Also Known As
El sargento de hierro, maître de guerre
MPAA Rating
R
Genre
Action
Drama
War
Release Date
1986
Production Company
Jay Weston Productions; Joseph Geisinger; Malpaso Productions; Pacific Title & Art Studio; Panavision, Ltd.; Tony's Food Service; Warner Bros. Pictures
Distribution Company
Thirteen Distributing Company; Thirteen Distributing Company; Warner Bros. Home Entertainment Group; Warner Bros. Pictures International
Location
San Diego, California, USA; Los Angeles, California, USA; Camp Pendleton, California, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 10m

Award Nominations

Best Sound

1986

Articles

TCM Remembers - Eileen Heckart


TCM REMEMBERS EILEEN HECKART, DAVID SWIFT & PAUL LANDRES

Eileen Heckart, who won a Best Supporting Actress Oscar for Butterflies Are Free (1972), died December 31st at the age of 82. Heckart was born in 1919 in Columbus, Ohio and became interested in acting while in college. She moved to NYC in 1942, married her college boyfriend the following year (a marriage that lasted until his death in 1995) and started acting on stage. Soon she was appearing in live dramatic TV such as The Philco Television Playhouse and Studio One. Her first feature film appearance was as a waitress in Bus Stop (1956) but it was her role as a grieving mother in the following year's The Bad Seed that really attracted notice and an Oscar nomination for Best Supporting Actress. Heckart spent more time on Broadway and TV, making only occasional film appearances in Heller in Pink Tights (1960), No Way to Treat a Lady (1968) and Heartbreak Ridge (1986). She won one Emmy and was nominated for five others.

TCM REMEMBERS DAVID SWIFT, 1919-2001

Director David Swift died December 31st at the age of 82. Swift was best-known for the 1967 film version of the Broadway musical, How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying (he also appears in a cameo), Good Neighbor Sam (1964) starring Jack Lemmon and The Parent Trap (1961), all of which he also co-wrote. Swift was born in Minnesota but moved to California in the early 30s so he could work for Disney as an assistant animator, contributing to a string of classics from Dumbo (1941) to Fantasia (1940) to Snow White (1937). Swift also worked with madcap animator Tex Avery at MGM. He later became a TV and radio comedy writer and by the 1950s was directing episodes of TV series like Wagon Train, The Rifleman, Alfred Hitchcock Presents, Playhouse 90 and others. Swift also created Mr. Peepers (1952), one of TV's first hit series and a multiple Emmy nominee. Swift's first feature film was Pollyanna (1960) for which he recorded a DVD commentary last year. Swift twice received Writers Guild nominations for work on How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying and The Parent Trap.

TCM REMEMBERS PAUL LANDRES, 1912-2001

Prolific B-movie director Paul Landres died December 26th at the age of 89. Landres was born in New York City in 1912 but his family soon moved to Los Angeles where he grew up. He spent a couple of years attending UCLA before becoming an assistant editor at Universal in the 1931. He became a full editor in 1937, working on such films as Pittsburgh (1942) and I Shot Jesse James (1949). His first directorial effort was 1949's Grand Canyon but he soon became fast and reliable, alternating B-movies with TV episodes.. His best known films are Go, Johnny, Go! (1958) with appearances by Chuck Berry and Jackie Wilson, the moody The Return of Dracula (1958) and the 1957 cult favorite The Vampire. His TV credits run to some 350 episodes for such series as Adam 12, Bonanza, Death Valley Days and numerous others. Landres was co-founder in 1950 of the honorary society American Cinema Editors.

BUDD BOETTICHER 1916-2001

When director Budd Boetticher died on November 29th, American film lost another master. Though not a household name, Boetticher made crisp, tightly wound movies with more substance and emotional depth than was apparent at first glance. Instead of a flashy style, Boetticher preferred one imaginatively simple and almost elegant at times. Because of this approach films like The Tall T (1957), Decision at Sundown (1957), The Bullfighter and the Lady (1951) and Ride Lonesome (1960) have withstood the test of time while more blatantly ambitious films now seem like period pieces.

Budd was born Oscar Boetticher in Chicago on July 29th, 1916. With a father who sold hardware, Boetticher didn't come from a particularly artistic background. In college he boxed and played football before graduating and heading to Mexico to follow what's surely one of the most unusual ways to enter the film industry: as a professional matador. That's what led an old friend to get Boetticher hired as a bullfighting advisor on the 1941 version of Blood and Sand. Boetticher quickly took other small jobs in Hollywood before becoming an assistant director for films like Cover Girl. In 1944, he directed his first film, the Boston Blackie entry One Mysterious Night. Boetticher made a series of other B-movies, like the underrated film noir Behind Locked Doors (1948), through the rest of the decade.

Boetticher really hit his stride in the 50s when he began to get higher profile assignments, including the semi-autobiographical The Bullfighter and the Lady in 1951 which resulted in Boetticher's only Oscar nomination, for Best Writing. Sam Peckinpah later said he saw the film ten times. Other highlights of this period include Seminole (1953) (one of the first Hollywood films sympathetic to American Indians), the stylishly tight thriller The Killer Is Loose (1956) and the minor classic Horizons West (1952). In the late 50s, Boetticher also started directing TV episodes of series like Maverick and 77 Sunset Strip.

In 1956, Boetticher started a string of films that really established his reputation. These six Westerns starring Randolph Scott are known as the Ranown films after the production company named after Randolph Scott and producer Harry Joe Brown. Actually the first, Seven Men from Now (1956), was produced by a different company but all of them fit together, pushing the idea of the lone cowboy seeking revenge into new territory. The sharp Decision at Sundown twists Western cliche into one of the bleakest endings to slip through the Hollywood gates. The Tall T examines the genre's violent tendencies while Ride Lonesome and Buchanan Rides Alone (1958) have titles appropriate to their Beckett-like stories. The final film, Comanche Station, appeared in 1960.

That was the same year Boetticher made one of the best gangster films, The Rise and Fall of Legs Diamond, before watching everything fall apart. He and his wife decided to make a documentary about the famous matador Carlos Arruza and headed to Mexico. There Boetticher saw Arruza and much of the film crew die in an accident, almost died himself from an illness, separated from and divorced his wife (Debra Paget), and then spent time in various jails and even briefly a mental institution. This harrowing experience left him bankrupt but he still managed to complete the film, Arruza (1968), which gathered acclaim from the few who've been able to see it.

Boetticher managed to make just one more film, My Kingdom For... (1985), a self-reflexive documentary about raising Andalusian horses. He also made a cameo appearance in the Mel Gibson-Kurt Russell suspense thriller, Tequila Sunrise (1988). He died from complications from surgery at the age of 85.

By Lang Thompson

Tcm Remembers - Eileen Heckart

TCM Remembers - Eileen Heckart

TCM REMEMBERS EILEEN HECKART, DAVID SWIFT & PAUL LANDRES Eileen Heckart, who won a Best Supporting Actress Oscar for Butterflies Are Free (1972), died December 31st at the age of 82. Heckart was born in 1919 in Columbus, Ohio and became interested in acting while in college. She moved to NYC in 1942, married her college boyfriend the following year (a marriage that lasted until his death in 1995) and started acting on stage. Soon she was appearing in live dramatic TV such as The Philco Television Playhouse and Studio One. Her first feature film appearance was as a waitress in Bus Stop (1956) but it was her role as a grieving mother in the following year's The Bad Seed that really attracted notice and an Oscar nomination for Best Supporting Actress. Heckart spent more time on Broadway and TV, making only occasional film appearances in Heller in Pink Tights (1960), No Way to Treat a Lady (1968) and Heartbreak Ridge (1986). She won one Emmy and was nominated for five others. TCM REMEMBERS DAVID SWIFT, 1919-2001 Director David Swift died December 31st at the age of 82. Swift was best-known for the 1967 film version of the Broadway musical, How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying (he also appears in a cameo), Good Neighbor Sam (1964) starring Jack Lemmon and The Parent Trap (1961), all of which he also co-wrote. Swift was born in Minnesota but moved to California in the early 30s so he could work for Disney as an assistant animator, contributing to a string of classics from Dumbo (1941) to Fantasia (1940) to Snow White (1937). Swift also worked with madcap animator Tex Avery at MGM. He later became a TV and radio comedy writer and by the 1950s was directing episodes of TV series like Wagon Train, The Rifleman, Alfred Hitchcock Presents, Playhouse 90 and others. Swift also created Mr. Peepers (1952), one of TV's first hit series and a multiple Emmy nominee. Swift's first feature film was Pollyanna (1960) for which he recorded a DVD commentary last year. Swift twice received Writers Guild nominations for work on How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying and The Parent Trap. TCM REMEMBERS PAUL LANDRES, 1912-2001 Prolific B-movie director Paul Landres died December 26th at the age of 89. Landres was born in New York City in 1912 but his family soon moved to Los Angeles where he grew up. He spent a couple of years attending UCLA before becoming an assistant editor at Universal in the 1931. He became a full editor in 1937, working on such films as Pittsburgh (1942) and I Shot Jesse James (1949). His first directorial effort was 1949's Grand Canyon but he soon became fast and reliable, alternating B-movies with TV episodes.. His best known films are Go, Johnny, Go! (1958) with appearances by Chuck Berry and Jackie Wilson, the moody The Return of Dracula (1958) and the 1957 cult favorite The Vampire. His TV credits run to some 350 episodes for such series as Adam 12, Bonanza, Death Valley Days and numerous others. Landres was co-founder in 1950 of the honorary society American Cinema Editors. BUDD BOETTICHER 1916-2001 When director Budd Boetticher died on November 29th, American film lost another master. Though not a household name, Boetticher made crisp, tightly wound movies with more substance and emotional depth than was apparent at first glance. Instead of a flashy style, Boetticher preferred one imaginatively simple and almost elegant at times. Because of this approach films like The Tall T (1957), Decision at Sundown (1957), The Bullfighter and the Lady (1951) and Ride Lonesome (1960) have withstood the test of time while more blatantly ambitious films now seem like period pieces. Budd was born Oscar Boetticher in Chicago on July 29th, 1916. With a father who sold hardware, Boetticher didn't come from a particularly artistic background. In college he boxed and played football before graduating and heading to Mexico to follow what's surely one of the most unusual ways to enter the film industry: as a professional matador. That's what led an old friend to get Boetticher hired as a bullfighting advisor on the 1941 version of Blood and Sand. Boetticher quickly took other small jobs in Hollywood before becoming an assistant director for films like Cover Girl. In 1944, he directed his first film, the Boston Blackie entry One Mysterious Night. Boetticher made a series of other B-movies, like the underrated film noir Behind Locked Doors (1948), through the rest of the decade. Boetticher really hit his stride in the 50s when he began to get higher profile assignments, including the semi-autobiographical The Bullfighter and the Lady in 1951 which resulted in Boetticher's only Oscar nomination, for Best Writing. Sam Peckinpah later said he saw the film ten times. Other highlights of this period include Seminole (1953) (one of the first Hollywood films sympathetic to American Indians), the stylishly tight thriller The Killer Is Loose (1956) and the minor classic Horizons West (1952). In the late 50s, Boetticher also started directing TV episodes of series like Maverick and 77 Sunset Strip. In 1956, Boetticher started a string of films that really established his reputation. These six Westerns starring Randolph Scott are known as the Ranown films after the production company named after Randolph Scott and producer Harry Joe Brown. Actually the first, Seven Men from Now (1956), was produced by a different company but all of them fit together, pushing the idea of the lone cowboy seeking revenge into new territory. The sharp Decision at Sundown twists Western cliche into one of the bleakest endings to slip through the Hollywood gates. The Tall T examines the genre's violent tendencies while Ride Lonesome and Buchanan Rides Alone (1958) have titles appropriate to their Beckett-like stories. The final film, Comanche Station, appeared in 1960. That was the same year Boetticher made one of the best gangster films, The Rise and Fall of Legs Diamond, before watching everything fall apart. He and his wife decided to make a documentary about the famous matador Carlos Arruza and headed to Mexico. There Boetticher saw Arruza and much of the film crew die in an accident, almost died himself from an illness, separated from and divorced his wife (Debra Paget), and then spent time in various jails and even briefly a mental institution. This harrowing experience left him bankrupt but he still managed to complete the film, Arruza (1968), which gathered acclaim from the few who've been able to see it. Boetticher managed to make just one more film, My Kingdom For... (1985), a self-reflexive documentary about raising Andalusian horses. He also made a cameo appearance in the Mel Gibson-Kurt Russell suspense thriller, Tequila Sunrise (1988). He died from complications from surgery at the age of 85. By Lang Thompson

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States December 4, 1986

Released in United States Winter December 5, 1986

Released in USA on video.

Began shooting June 4, 1986.

Released in United States December 4, 1986 (Benefit screening December 4, 1986.)

Released in United States Winter December 5, 1986