Hangover Square


1h 17m 1945

Brief Synopsis

A composer who can't control his creative temperament turns to murder.

Photos & Videos

Hangover Square - Lobby Cards
Hangover Square - Linda Darnell Publicity Still

Film Details

Genre
Drama
Crime
Thriller
Release Date
Feb 1945
Premiere Information
New York opening: 7 Feb 1945
Production Company
Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp.
Distribution Company
Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp.
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the novel Hangover Square; or, The Man with Two Minds by Patrick Hamilton (London, 1941).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 17m
Sound
Mono (Western Electric Sound System)
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
6,966ft (9 reels)

Synopsis

In the early 1900s, composer George Harvey Bone finds himself walking along Fulham Road in London, and, unaware that he has just murdered an antique dealer named Ogilby, struggles to remember the events of the previous night. When George reaches his flat in Hangover Square, he is greeted by his friend Barbara and her father, Sir Henry Chapman. Sir Henry is pleased with George's progress on a new concerto and offers to conduct it at a soirée he is hosting in the winter. George is delighted by Sir Henry's generosity, but later reveals to Barbara that he has had another blackout and is uncertain about the origin of the bloodstained dagger in his pocket. Just then, George and Barbara hear a newsboy shout out the news of a murder in Fulham, and George decides to follow his doctor's recommendation and consult Allan Middleton, a Scotland Yard doctor who specializes in problems of the mind. George explains to Middleton that while he has always had "black moods," lately they have lasted longer, and he fears that he could be capable of violence. Middleton's questions prompt George to disclose that he has been working too hard, and that the moods are initiated by any loud, discordant sound. Middleton then promises to investigate and sends George home. Later that night, Middleton visits George and assures him that he must be innocent of Ogilby's murder, as the blood on George's coat was his own, and the disreputable nature of Ogilby's clientele has led police to suspect revenge or theft as the motive for the murder and subseqent burning of the shop. Middleton cautions George against working so much and advises him to relax more, and so George goes to a pub. There, George is stunned by beautiful singer Netta Longdon, whose pianist boyfriend, Mickey, is a friend of George's. George introduces himself to Netta, but her interest in him is piqued only when he plays a captivating tune. The scheming Netta flirts with George and induces him to look after her cat in order to get him to compose for her. George's song brings in a profit for Mickey and Netta, and Mickey encourages Netta to continue to date George, even though she finds him dull. George is unaware of Mickey's relationship with Netta, and is infuriated one night when he discovers that Netta has broken a date with him in order to sing at a nightclub for theatrical producer Eddie Carstairs. Barbara, who has witnessed George's confrontation with Netta, reprimands him for wasting his talent on a common singer, and George's agitation leads to another blackout when he hears a loud noise. While in his trance, George attempts to strangle Barbara with a thuggee cord made from a drape sash, but stops and escapes without being seen. Unaware that George was her attacker, Barbara seeks comfort from him, and he promises to finish his concerto. George then works compusively on his composition and days later is visited by Netta, who chastises him for neglecting her. George informs Netta that he is through with her, but her seductive charm overcomes his resolve, and he forgets his concerto to write more songs for her opening night at Carstairs' theater. Believing that Netta has promised herself to him, George proposes to her a week later and is heartbroken to discover that she is engaged to Carstairs. George staggers home, but a loud noise throws him into a trance and he returns to Netta's hotel, where he strangles her. After rolling Netta's body in a carpet and covering her face with a mask, George carries her to the top of a massive Guy Fawkes Day bonfire, and soon all evidence of George's crime has vanished. The police are baffled by Netta's disappearance, and Middleton is puzzled by reports that George was acting suspiciously on the night she was last seen. George denies any culpability and finishes his concerto, although mounting evidence prompts Middleton to question him repeatedly. On the night of Sir Henry's soiree, Middleton asks George to come to Scotland Yard, but George locks him in a coal shed and goes to the Chapmans' house. There, as George is playing piano under Sir Henry's direction, memories of killing Netta overwhelm him. He runs off to another room while Barbara continues the performance, then makes a full confession to Middleton, who has been freed. Middleton gently tells George that he is not responsible for his actions, but when Superintendent Clay insists that George be arrested before the end of the concerto, George eludes his captors and sets the Chapman house on fire. Completely insane, George plays the finale while the house burns down around him, and Middleton assures the distraught Barbara and Sir Henry that "it's better this way."

Photo Collections

Hangover Square - Lobby Cards
Here are a few lobby cards from Fox's Hangover Square (1944), starring Laird Cregar, Linda Darnell, and George Sanders. Lobby Cards were 11" x 14" posters that came in sets of 8. As the name implies, they were most often displayed in movie theater lobbies, to advertise current or coming attractions.
Hangover Square - Linda Darnell Publicity Still
Here is a photo of Linda Darnell taken to help publicize Fox's Hangover Square (1945). Publicity stills were specially-posed photos, usually taken off the set, for purposes of publicity or reference for promotional artwork.

Film Details

Genre
Drama
Crime
Thriller
Release Date
Feb 1945
Premiere Information
New York opening: 7 Feb 1945
Production Company
Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp.
Distribution Company
Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp.
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the novel Hangover Square; or, The Man with Two Minds by Patrick Hamilton (London, 1941).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 17m
Sound
Mono (Western Electric Sound System)
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
6,966ft (9 reels)

Articles

Hangover Square


20th Century-Fox found great popular and critical success with the release of the medium-budget thriller The Lodger (1944), which won over audiences with its fog-shrouded, turn-of-the-century London teeming with bawdy showgirls, murder, and an atmosphere of paranoia. The film was a showcase for Fox contract star Laird Cregar, who won acclaim for his brooding performance in the title role. The follow-up film, Hangover Square (1945), reunited the director and scenarist of The Lodger with Cregar and co-star George Sanders.

Cregar instigated the project; he read the novel by Patrick Hamilton (Hangover Square; or, The Man with Two Minds), and urged Fox to purchase the rights. The large (6' 3" and close to 300 pounds), idiosyncratic actor felt that an adaptation of the book would feature a more sympathetic and somewhat more romantic lead part for him. Studio head Darryl F. Zanuck, though, felt that the property should more closely imitate The Lodger, so he ordered that the time period be changed from modern day to turn-of-the-century London. (This also made economic sense as far as Zanuck was concerned – some sets from the previous picture could be reused for the new one). Cregar was upset by the changes and briefly threatened to walk off the film. Zanuck pressed on and brought together Cregar with The Lodger co-star Sanders, as well as screenwriter Barre Lyndon and director John Brahm.

Brahm marks the film immediately with the flourish of a startling subjective camera scene – a brutal murder from the point-of-view of the killer, a London composer named George Harvey Bone (Cregar). In a Fulham antiques shop, Bone knifes the shop owner and smashes a lamp to set the room ablaze. He escapes to the street in a daze and walks home to his flat in Hangover Square. By the time he arrives he has forgotten his deed, which has occurred during a mental lapse. Bone is busy composing a concerto, which is to be conducted by his neighbor, Sir Henry Chapman (Alan Napier). Bone receives encouragement from Chapman's daughter Barbara (Faye Marlowe), but he is also disturbed and distracted by his "black little moods" which, unknown to him, lead to violent fits of murderous rage brought on by loud, dissonant sounds. Worried, Bone seeks out Dr. Allan Middleton (Sanders) of Scotland Yard. Middleton specializes in mental problems, and advises Bone to seek stress relief by distracting himself from his work. Bone tries to relax at the local Music Hall, but there he encounters Netta Longdon (Linda Darnell), a vain and ambitious showgirl who soon has designs on Bone's fragile mind for music.

Fox initially sought Marlene Dietrich for the role of Netta, but the studio could not meet her asking price. Geraldine Fitzgerald was also considered, but ultimately the part went to Fox contract player Linda Darnell. Although Darnell does not even attempt a London accent, she was well-received and the role as the manipulative dance hall girl became one of the most defining of her career. Netta is nothing less than a noir femme fatale, taking a venerable, weak-willed male and twisting his will to suit her selfish needs. Netta drags George Bone down from his position of High Culture until he slums in the low-brow world of Music Hall songs. When she hears a potential popular melody in part of his concerto, Netta pleads with him to fashion a song out of it and coos, "Oh George, it's such a little thing – your concerto would never miss it."

Music plays a crucial role in Hangover Square, and the score became a showcase for the talents of Bernard Herrmann; the composer had always preferred to work during a film's production (as he had on two previous memorable occasions - for Orson Welles' Citizen Kane and William Dieterle's All That Money Can Buy [both 1941]), and this project required an original concerto prior to shooting. In his book A Heart at Fire's Center: The Life and Music of Bernard Herrmann, Steven C. Smith describes the composer's use of repeating motifs to emphasize the themes of the film: "Herrmann carefully establishes each thematic strand in his score so that their ultimate presentation makes sense to us, as well as to Bone onscreen. First comes a violent introduction for piano, its leaping, dissonant intervals evoking Bone's dementia; it climaxes with Herrmann's favorite semitone pattern (brutally pronounced by muted horns), a leitmotiv of evil. ...Culminating each killing is Herrmann's 'fire' motif, which becomes the concerto's scherzo." Smith calls the concerto itself "a diabolical, Lisztian work that compressed the usual three movements into one, [and] was unlike any of the 'film concertos' then prevalent in Hollywood, which usually paraphrased existing works in rhapsodic, overscored fashion."

A 'fire' motif was a must for the score – the film opens and concludes with blazing scenes, and perhaps the most memorable sequence in the film involves a ritualistic inferno. To dispose of one of his victims, Bone bundles the body in a blanket, and puts a Guy Fawkes mask over the face. He marches with a crowd to bring his bundle to a towering bonfire, climbing a ladder to plop the "dummy" on the top. Bone is singed during his climb down, as the revelers are anxious to touch their torches to the bonfire and get on with their celebration. Bone finds himself as awed as anyone at the enormity of the blaze which will hide the evidence of his latest blackout crime. (The scene proved to be so effective, director Brahm couldn't help but repeat it nearly a decade later for the 3-D chiller The Mad Magician [1954], starring Vincent Price).

Brahm later commented on Herrmann's work, saying that "the music stimulated me so much. For a long time I had been dissatisfied with the photography of music in films. Musicians themselves are uninteresting; it is what they play that should be photographed. I myself could not read a note of music, but when Herrmann came and saw the finished film he could not believe it. I had photographed his music." It certainly helped in this regard that Cregar was a competent enough pianist in real life – although overdubbed, his piano playing was genuine and not accomplished by cutaways, as is the Hollywood norm.

The final scene involving a blazing inferno was filmed outdoors at night on the Fox backlot, and included a small army of extras and behind-the-scenes personnel handling the fire and other physical effects. Actor Alan Napier later told of his friend George Sanders, who was determined to avoid delivering a line that he found objectionable. After several takes during which Sanders stonewalled the director, producer Robert Bassler was called to the set. "Bassler finally appeared in a raincoat and went up to George, who was seated in a little chair. Bassler was yelling at him, calling him a son of a bitch – and George, without moving from his sitting position, hit him in the chin. That ended the shooting that night. The next day Zanuck, Bassler and Brahm had a meeting and straightened it all out, with George saying slightly different lines. But one must say it takes an extraordinary degree of cool, on an expensive night of an expensive picture, with complete sangfroid, to f*ck it all up."

Laird Cregar felt that Hangover Square offered him a chance to cut a more romantic figure than he had in previous films (perhaps a case where life imitated art, considering that his character, George Bone, was deluded into thinking he was more of a ladies' man than he was). Cregar dieted and lost a considerable amount of weight for the role. Following the end of shooting, Cregar continued his crash diet, and proudly posed for Fox publicity photos showing off his new waistline. The dieting caused severe abdominal problems however. Cregar went into the hospital for stomach surgery and died a few days later, on December 9, 1944, of a heart attack, at the age of 28. Hangover Square was released posthumously, in February, 1945.

The critic for Time magazine called the film a "top-drawer horror picture" and said, "the flaming, grotesque denouement of this unhappy tale may leave audiences undecided whether to laugh or blush. This may do no serious harm, for up to then the film is very good." He goes on to say that "Cregar, brilliant and touching in his embodiment of the hero's anguished, innocent, dangerous confusion, will leave cinemaddicts pondering sadly on the major roles he might have played. One of the most impressive things about the picture, and certainly the most unprecedented, is the concerto with which he accompanies his holocaust. The work of Bernard Herrmann, it is for once not a pale-pink potpourri of woman's club classics, but the lushly introspective, resourceful sort of music a promising young composer might indeed have written."

One fan of Hangover Square, and of Herrmann's score in particular, was a fifteen-year-old music student in New York named Stephen Sondheim. The future composer of Sweeny Todd wrote Herrmann a letter in praise of the concerto and received a thank-you note in reply. Smith quotes Sondheim, who recalls "I can still play the opening eight bars, since they were glimpsed briefly on Laird Cregar's piano during the course of the film, and I dutifully memorized them by sitting through the picture twice."

Producer: Robert Bassler
Director: John Brahm
Screenplay: Barre Lyndon
Cinematography: Joseph LaShelle
Art Direction: Maurice Ransford, Lyle Wheeler
Music: Bernard Herrmann
Film Editing: Harry Reynolds
Cast: Laird Cregar (George Harvey Bone), Linda Darnell (Netta Longdon), George Sanders (Dr. Allan Middleton), Glenn Langan (Eddie Carstairs), Faye Marlowe (Barbara Chapman), Alan Napier (Sir Henry Chapman)
BW-77m.

by John M. Miller

Hangover Square

Hangover Square

20th Century-Fox found great popular and critical success with the release of the medium-budget thriller The Lodger (1944), which won over audiences with its fog-shrouded, turn-of-the-century London teeming with bawdy showgirls, murder, and an atmosphere of paranoia. The film was a showcase for Fox contract star Laird Cregar, who won acclaim for his brooding performance in the title role. The follow-up film, Hangover Square (1945), reunited the director and scenarist of The Lodger with Cregar and co-star George Sanders. Cregar instigated the project; he read the novel by Patrick Hamilton (Hangover Square; or, The Man with Two Minds), and urged Fox to purchase the rights. The large (6' 3" and close to 300 pounds), idiosyncratic actor felt that an adaptation of the book would feature a more sympathetic and somewhat more romantic lead part for him. Studio head Darryl F. Zanuck, though, felt that the property should more closely imitate The Lodger, so he ordered that the time period be changed from modern day to turn-of-the-century London. (This also made economic sense as far as Zanuck was concerned – some sets from the previous picture could be reused for the new one). Cregar was upset by the changes and briefly threatened to walk off the film. Zanuck pressed on and brought together Cregar with The Lodger co-star Sanders, as well as screenwriter Barre Lyndon and director John Brahm. Brahm marks the film immediately with the flourish of a startling subjective camera scene – a brutal murder from the point-of-view of the killer, a London composer named George Harvey Bone (Cregar). In a Fulham antiques shop, Bone knifes the shop owner and smashes a lamp to set the room ablaze. He escapes to the street in a daze and walks home to his flat in Hangover Square. By the time he arrives he has forgotten his deed, which has occurred during a mental lapse. Bone is busy composing a concerto, which is to be conducted by his neighbor, Sir Henry Chapman (Alan Napier). Bone receives encouragement from Chapman's daughter Barbara (Faye Marlowe), but he is also disturbed and distracted by his "black little moods" which, unknown to him, lead to violent fits of murderous rage brought on by loud, dissonant sounds. Worried, Bone seeks out Dr. Allan Middleton (Sanders) of Scotland Yard. Middleton specializes in mental problems, and advises Bone to seek stress relief by distracting himself from his work. Bone tries to relax at the local Music Hall, but there he encounters Netta Longdon (Linda Darnell), a vain and ambitious showgirl who soon has designs on Bone's fragile mind for music. Fox initially sought Marlene Dietrich for the role of Netta, but the studio could not meet her asking price. Geraldine Fitzgerald was also considered, but ultimately the part went to Fox contract player Linda Darnell. Although Darnell does not even attempt a London accent, she was well-received and the role as the manipulative dance hall girl became one of the most defining of her career. Netta is nothing less than a noir femme fatale, taking a venerable, weak-willed male and twisting his will to suit her selfish needs. Netta drags George Bone down from his position of High Culture until he slums in the low-brow world of Music Hall songs. When she hears a potential popular melody in part of his concerto, Netta pleads with him to fashion a song out of it and coos, "Oh George, it's such a little thing – your concerto would never miss it." Music plays a crucial role in Hangover Square, and the score became a showcase for the talents of Bernard Herrmann; the composer had always preferred to work during a film's production (as he had on two previous memorable occasions - for Orson Welles' Citizen Kane and William Dieterle's All That Money Can Buy [both 1941]), and this project required an original concerto prior to shooting. In his book A Heart at Fire's Center: The Life and Music of Bernard Herrmann, Steven C. Smith describes the composer's use of repeating motifs to emphasize the themes of the film: "Herrmann carefully establishes each thematic strand in his score so that their ultimate presentation makes sense to us, as well as to Bone onscreen. First comes a violent introduction for piano, its leaping, dissonant intervals evoking Bone's dementia; it climaxes with Herrmann's favorite semitone pattern (brutally pronounced by muted horns), a leitmotiv of evil. ...Culminating each killing is Herrmann's 'fire' motif, which becomes the concerto's scherzo." Smith calls the concerto itself "a diabolical, Lisztian work that compressed the usual three movements into one, [and] was unlike any of the 'film concertos' then prevalent in Hollywood, which usually paraphrased existing works in rhapsodic, overscored fashion." A 'fire' motif was a must for the score – the film opens and concludes with blazing scenes, and perhaps the most memorable sequence in the film involves a ritualistic inferno. To dispose of one of his victims, Bone bundles the body in a blanket, and puts a Guy Fawkes mask over the face. He marches with a crowd to bring his bundle to a towering bonfire, climbing a ladder to plop the "dummy" on the top. Bone is singed during his climb down, as the revelers are anxious to touch their torches to the bonfire and get on with their celebration. Bone finds himself as awed as anyone at the enormity of the blaze which will hide the evidence of his latest blackout crime. (The scene proved to be so effective, director Brahm couldn't help but repeat it nearly a decade later for the 3-D chiller The Mad Magician [1954], starring Vincent Price). Brahm later commented on Herrmann's work, saying that "the music stimulated me so much. For a long time I had been dissatisfied with the photography of music in films. Musicians themselves are uninteresting; it is what they play that should be photographed. I myself could not read a note of music, but when Herrmann came and saw the finished film he could not believe it. I had photographed his music." It certainly helped in this regard that Cregar was a competent enough pianist in real life – although overdubbed, his piano playing was genuine and not accomplished by cutaways, as is the Hollywood norm. The final scene involving a blazing inferno was filmed outdoors at night on the Fox backlot, and included a small army of extras and behind-the-scenes personnel handling the fire and other physical effects. Actor Alan Napier later told of his friend George Sanders, who was determined to avoid delivering a line that he found objectionable. After several takes during which Sanders stonewalled the director, producer Robert Bassler was called to the set. "Bassler finally appeared in a raincoat and went up to George, who was seated in a little chair. Bassler was yelling at him, calling him a son of a bitch – and George, without moving from his sitting position, hit him in the chin. That ended the shooting that night. The next day Zanuck, Bassler and Brahm had a meeting and straightened it all out, with George saying slightly different lines. But one must say it takes an extraordinary degree of cool, on an expensive night of an expensive picture, with complete sangfroid, to f*ck it all up." Laird Cregar felt that Hangover Square offered him a chance to cut a more romantic figure than he had in previous films (perhaps a case where life imitated art, considering that his character, George Bone, was deluded into thinking he was more of a ladies' man than he was). Cregar dieted and lost a considerable amount of weight for the role. Following the end of shooting, Cregar continued his crash diet, and proudly posed for Fox publicity photos showing off his new waistline. The dieting caused severe abdominal problems however. Cregar went into the hospital for stomach surgery and died a few days later, on December 9, 1944, of a heart attack, at the age of 28. Hangover Square was released posthumously, in February, 1945. The critic for Time magazine called the film a "top-drawer horror picture" and said, "the flaming, grotesque denouement of this unhappy tale may leave audiences undecided whether to laugh or blush. This may do no serious harm, for up to then the film is very good." He goes on to say that "Cregar, brilliant and touching in his embodiment of the hero's anguished, innocent, dangerous confusion, will leave cinemaddicts pondering sadly on the major roles he might have played. One of the most impressive things about the picture, and certainly the most unprecedented, is the concerto with which he accompanies his holocaust. The work of Bernard Herrmann, it is for once not a pale-pink potpourri of woman's club classics, but the lushly introspective, resourceful sort of music a promising young composer might indeed have written." One fan of Hangover Square, and of Herrmann's score in particular, was a fifteen-year-old music student in New York named Stephen Sondheim. The future composer of Sweeny Todd wrote Herrmann a letter in praise of the concerto and received a thank-you note in reply. Smith quotes Sondheim, who recalls "I can still play the opening eight bars, since they were glimpsed briefly on Laird Cregar's piano during the course of the film, and I dutifully memorized them by sitting through the picture twice." Producer: Robert Bassler Director: John Brahm Screenplay: Barre Lyndon Cinematography: Joseph LaShelle Art Direction: Maurice Ransford, Lyle Wheeler Music: Bernard Herrmann Film Editing: Harry Reynolds Cast: Laird Cregar (George Harvey Bone), Linda Darnell (Netta Longdon), George Sanders (Dr. Allan Middleton), Glenn Langan (Eddie Carstairs), Faye Marlowe (Barbara Chapman), Alan Napier (Sir Henry Chapman) BW-77m. by John M. Miller

Quotes

Trivia

This was Laird Cregar's last film.

Notes

According to a July 25, 1944 Hollywood Reporter news item, the studio was negotiating with Marlene Dietrich to appear in this picture. Modern sources claim that Dietrich was sought for the role of "Netta," and that later, after Dietrich refused the part, Geraldine Fitzgerald was under consideration. August 1944 Hollywood Reporter news items reveal that Laird Cregar was placed under suspension by Twentieth Century-Fox for refusing the lead role in the picture and was temporarily replaced in the part by Glenn Langan. According to modern sources, Cregar, who had urged the studio to purchase Patrick Hamilton's book, refused the role due to his disappointment with scriptwriter Barré Lyndon's changes in the story, which included setting it in an earlier time period and altering the character of "George Harvey Bone." Despite his fears that he would be permanently typecast as a villain and never receive an opportunity to play a more typical leading man, Cregar accepted the role and for it received the only top billing of his career.
       According to conference notes in the Twentieth Century-Fox Produced Scripts Collection, located at the UCLA Arts-Special Collections Library, studio production head Darryl F. Zanuck ordered that the time period be shifted from 1937 to 1910, and that the sets from The Lodger be re-used. Although Hollywood Reporter production charts include Reginald Gardiner in the cast of the film, he does not appear in the finished picture. An October 1944 Daily Variety news item reported that on October 9, 1944, producer Robert Bassler and actor George Sanders came to blows over Sanders' reluctance to perform a "tag line" in one scene. Modern sources add that their confrontation occurred over the scene at the film's end, when "George" is playing the piano inside the burning home and "Middleton" assures "Sir Henry" that it is best to leave "George" as he is.
       Several reviews compared Hangover Square to The Lodger, which was a successful 1944 Twentieth Century-Fox film produced by Bassler, directed by John Brahm, written by Lyndon and starring Cregar and Sanders. Hangover Square marked the screen debut of Faye Marlowe, the daughter of dance director Fanchon, and also featured the final film appearance of Cregar, who died on December 9, 1944 of a heart attack precipitated by severe dieting and abdominal surgery. In praising Cregar's performance, the Time reviewer stated, "The late Laird Cregar, brilliant and touching in his embodiment of the hero's anguished, innocent, dangerous confusion, will leave cinemaddicts pondering sadly on the major roles he might have played." Although modern sources refer to Bernard Herrmann's original composition for the film as "Concerto Macabre" or "Concerto Macabre for Piano and Orchestra," music cue sheets contained in the Twentieth Century-Fox Records of the Legal Department, also located at UCLA, list the piece simply as "Concerto." A modern source credits Ignace Hilsberg with playing the piece for the film's soundtrack.

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States 1983

Released in United States Winter February 1945

Released in United States 1983 (Shown at FILMEX: Los Angeles International Film Exposition ("B" Movie Marathon) April 13 - May 1, 1983.)

Released in United States Winter February 1945