A Guide for the Married Man


1h 29m 1967

Brief Synopsis

Robert Morse and Walter Mathau are friends. Though both are married, Mathau discovers Morris is fooling around. When asked about it, Morse passes on the oral history and guide to fooling around without your wife finding out. This is done by a series of vignettes with cameos from famous actors that illustrate the point Morse wants to make. Between pieces of advice, we follow Matheau as he begins to prepare for his big affair.

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Release Date
Jan 1967
Premiere Information
New York opening: 25 May 1967
Production Company
Twentieth Century--Fox Film Corp.
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the novel A Guide for the Married Man, as Told to Frank Tarloff by Frank Tarloff (Los Angeles, 1967).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 29m
Sound
Mono (Westrex Recording System)
Color
Color (DeLuxe)
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
2.35 : 1

Synopsis

Paul Manning realizes to his dismay that after 12 happy years of marriage he is becoming increasingly distracted by other women. He is particularly attracted to his neighbor, Irma Johnson. To make matters worse, his philandering friend, Ed Stander, claims that to preserve a marriage, the husband should secretly indulge in a little extramarital activity. As a gesture of true camaraderie, Ed volunteers to teach Paul the finer points of wife-cheating and illustrates his lectures with stories of friends who have had successful or unsuccessful affairs. Paul proves to be a willing and able pupil and easily manipulates his unsuspecting wife, Ruth, into suggesting that he occasionally spend a night at the steam baths. Paul then carefully selects his first target, Jocelyn Montgomery, a seductive divorcée who must also practice discretion to protect her alimony. A remote motel is chosen, and a rendezvous is arranged. But once alone in the bedroom with Jocelyn, Paul's thoughts turn to Ruth, and he shows the unbelieving Jocelyn snapshots of his family. Suddenly, police sirens and screams are heard as police raid a motel across the way. Photographers take pictures of a startled, undressed man--Ed Stander--entertaining Irma Johnson. Paul takes one quick look, leaps into his clothes, pushes Jocelyn into his car, dumps her off at a parking lot, and races home to his wife.

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Release Date
Jan 1967
Premiere Information
New York opening: 25 May 1967
Production Company
Twentieth Century--Fox Film Corp.
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the novel A Guide for the Married Man, as Told to Frank Tarloff by Frank Tarloff (Los Angeles, 1967).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 29m
Sound
Mono (Westrex Recording System)
Color
Color (DeLuxe)
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
2.35 : 1

Articles

Louis Nye (1913-2005)


"Hi-Ho, Steverino," was the catchphrase uttered by Gordon Hathaway, the fey, rich snob who greeted Steve Allen during the golden age of television. The man behind it all was Louis Nye, a fine character comedian who for the past 50 years had been a unique, lively presence in film and television. Sadly, Nye passed away on October 9 after a long battle with lung cancer at his Los Angeles home. He was 92.

Nye was born on May 1, 1913, in Hartford, Connecticut to Russian immigrants. He began his career in theater in his native Hartford before moving to New York City to break into radio. After a stint in the Army during World War II, Nye returned to find a new medium dawning, television. His start was inauspicious, just a few appearances on the Cavalcade of Stars, but little did he realize that when he was picked up for The Steve Allen Show in 1956 that he, along with other talented comedians like Don Knotts, Tom Poston and Bill Dana, were courting stardom. The program was one of the first sketch series to take off on television. It was justly celebrated for the wacky characterizations that the cast invented, and Nye's Gordon Hathaway was no exception. Sure, his take on the country club elite was a touch prissy and effete, but Nye injected Gordon with a raffish charm and child-like sensibilty that never made the character offensive. If anything, Gordon Hathaway was endearing.

His stint on Steve Allen opened up the movie offers, the first of which, the garish Mamie Van Doren vehicle Sex Kittens Go to College (1960), was not exactly a highpoint in cinema comedy, but he soon settled into some good supporting parts in a slew of films: The Facts of Life (1960), The Last Time I Saw Archie (his best film role, a terrrific comic foil for Robert Mitchum, 1961), The Wheeler Dealers, Who's Been Sleeping in My Bed? (both 1963), Good Neighbor Sam (another great part as an inept detective, 1964), and A Guide for the Married Man (1967).

Nye's career cooled in the '70s, with an occasional television appearance (Laverne & Shirley, Fantasy Island) and mediocre flicks (Won Ton Ton, the Dog Who Saved Hollywood (1976), Harper Valley P.T.A. (1978). Eventually, he found solace in voice work for many animated shows, the most popular of them being his long run on Inspector Gadget (1985-99). Still, just when you thought he was out of the limelight, he returned as a semi-regular in the critically acclaimed HBO comedy Curb Your Enthusiasm where for two seasons (2000-2002), he was hilarious as comic Jeff Garlin's sardonic father. Give Mr. Nye his due, he left the stage near the top of his game. He is survived by his wife, Anita; and a son, Peter.

by Michael T. Toole
Louis Nye (1913-2005)

Louis Nye (1913-2005)

"Hi-Ho, Steverino," was the catchphrase uttered by Gordon Hathaway, the fey, rich snob who greeted Steve Allen during the golden age of television. The man behind it all was Louis Nye, a fine character comedian who for the past 50 years had been a unique, lively presence in film and television. Sadly, Nye passed away on October 9 after a long battle with lung cancer at his Los Angeles home. He was 92. Nye was born on May 1, 1913, in Hartford, Connecticut to Russian immigrants. He began his career in theater in his native Hartford before moving to New York City to break into radio. After a stint in the Army during World War II, Nye returned to find a new medium dawning, television. His start was inauspicious, just a few appearances on the Cavalcade of Stars, but little did he realize that when he was picked up for The Steve Allen Show in 1956 that he, along with other talented comedians like Don Knotts, Tom Poston and Bill Dana, were courting stardom. The program was one of the first sketch series to take off on television. It was justly celebrated for the wacky characterizations that the cast invented, and Nye's Gordon Hathaway was no exception. Sure, his take on the country club elite was a touch prissy and effete, but Nye injected Gordon with a raffish charm and child-like sensibilty that never made the character offensive. If anything, Gordon Hathaway was endearing. His stint on Steve Allen opened up the movie offers, the first of which, the garish Mamie Van Doren vehicle Sex Kittens Go to College (1960), was not exactly a highpoint in cinema comedy, but he soon settled into some good supporting parts in a slew of films: The Facts of Life (1960), The Last Time I Saw Archie (his best film role, a terrrific comic foil for Robert Mitchum, 1961), The Wheeler Dealers, Who's Been Sleeping in My Bed? (both 1963), Good Neighbor Sam (another great part as an inept detective, 1964), and A Guide for the Married Man (1967). Nye's career cooled in the '70s, with an occasional television appearance (Laverne & Shirley, Fantasy Island) and mediocre flicks (Won Ton Ton, the Dog Who Saved Hollywood (1976), Harper Valley P.T.A. (1978). Eventually, he found solace in voice work for many animated shows, the most popular of them being his long run on Inspector Gadget (1985-99). Still, just when you thought he was out of the limelight, he returned as a semi-regular in the critically acclaimed HBO comedy Curb Your Enthusiasm where for two seasons (2000-2002), he was hilarious as comic Jeff Garlin's sardonic father. Give Mr. Nye his due, he left the stage near the top of his game. He is survived by his wife, Anita; and a son, Peter. by Michael T. Toole

Quotes

Basic Principle number one: Never, NEVER say you'll be where you can be found not to be.
- Ed Stander

Trivia

Notes

Copyright length: 92 min. Location scenes filmed in and around Los Angeles.

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Summer June 1967

Released in United States Summer June 1967