The Great Muppet Caper


1h 37m 1981

Film Details

Also Known As
Great Muppet Caper
MPAA Rating
Release Date
1981
Production Company
Itc Entertainment Group
Distribution Company
Itc Entertainment Group; The Jim Henson Company

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 37m

Synopsis

Cast

Diana Rigg

Lady Holiday

Charles Grodin

Nicky Holiday

John Cleese

Neville

Robert Morley

British Gentleman

Peter Ustinov

Truck Driver

Jack Warden

Editor

Erica Creer

Marla

Kate Howard

Carla

Della Finch

Darla

Michael Robbins

Security Guard

Joan Sanderson

Dorcas

Peter Hughes

Maitre D'

Peggy Aitchison

Prison Guard

Tommy Godfrey

Bus Conductor

Katia Borg

1st Model

Valli Kemp

2nd Model

Michele Ivan-zadeh

3rd Model

Chai Lee

4th Model

Christine Nelson

Girl In Park

Rodney Lovick

Doorman

Suzanne Church

Reporter

Ian Hanham

Reporter

David Ludwig

Delivery Man

Mary Mazstead

Prisoner

Patti Dalton

Prisoner

Cynthia Ashley

Charlie'S Water Ballet Performer

Lynn Latham

Charlie'S Water Ballet Performer

Susan Backlinie

Charlie'S Water Ballet Performer

Cynthia Leake

Charlie'S Water Ballet Performer

Sherrill Cannon

Charlie'S Water Ballet Performer

Kahren Lohren

Charlie'S Water Ballet Performer

Christine Cullen

Charlie'S Water Ballet Performer

Tricia Mcfarlin

Charlie'S Water Ballet Performer

Susie Guest

Charlie'S Water Ballet Performer

Denise Mckenna

Charlie'S Water Ballet Performer

Wendy Holker

Charlie'S Water Ballet Performer

Melina Lee Phelps

Charlie'S Water Ballet Performer

Linda Horn

Charlie'S Water Ballet Performer

Denise Potter

Charlie'S Water Ballet Performer

Lee Keenan

Charlie'S Water Ballet Performer

Ann Rynne

Charlie'S Water Ballet Performer

Darine Klega

Charlie'S Water Ballet Performer

Roberta Ward

Charlie'S Water Ballet Performer

Peter Falk

Tramp

Jim Henson

Voice Of Kermit The Frog/Rowlf/Dr Teeth/Waldorf

Frank Oz

Voice Of Miss Piggy/Fozzie Bear/Anima

Dave Goelz

Voice Of Gonzo/Chester Rat/Bill The Frog/Zoot

Jerry Nelson

Voice Of Floyd Pepper/Camilla/Lew Zealand

Richard Hunt

Voice Of Scotter/Statler/Janice

Steve Whitmire

Voice Of Rizzo The Rat/Bill The Frog

Caroll Spinney

Voice

Louise Gold

Voice

Kathryn Mullen

Voice

Bob Payne

Voice

Robert Barnett

Voice

Brian Muehl

Voice

Hugh Spight

Voice

Mike Quinn

Voice

Brian Henson

Voice

Crew

Terry Ackland-snow

Art Direction

Terry Ackland-snow

Other

Betty Adamson

Wardrobe Supervisor

Maurice Arnold

Video Coordinator

Maurice Arnold

Senior Assistant Camera

Leslee Asch

Muppet Design

Leslee Asch

Muppet Builder

Martin G Baker

Location Manager

George Ball

Property Master

Michael Barnes

Casting

Robert Barnett

Muppet Performer

Sidney Barnsby

Production Assistant Supervisor

Bi Benton

Production Assistant

Charles Bishop

Art Direction Supervisor

Derek Browne

Camera Operator

Allen Burry

Publicist

Joan Carpenter

Hairstyles

Ed Christie

Muppet Builder

Ed Christie

Muppet Design

Michael Clifford

Sound Editor (Music)

Lyle Conway

Muppet Builder

Lyle Conway

Muppet Design

Patsy Delord

Production Assistant

Marcus Dods

Music Conductor

Marcel Durham

Assistant Editor

Faz Fazakas

Muppet Technical Design

Roy Field

Other

Nomi Frederick

Muppet Builder

Nomi Frederick

Muppet Design

Stuart Freeborn

Makeup Supervisor

Michael K Frith

Muppet Design Consultant

Dick Gallegly

Production Manager (Usa)

Joan Garrick

Muppet Builder

Joan Garrick

Muppet Design

Dave Goelz

Muppet Performer

Louise Gold

Muppet Performer

Jane Gootnick

Muppet Design

Jane Gootnick

Muppet Builder

Joanne Green

Costumes (Muppets)

Robyn Hamilton-doney

Set Dresser

Julie Harris

Costume Designer

Calista Hendrickson

Costumes (Muppets)

Brian Henson

Muppet Performer

Jim Henson

Muppet Performer

Richard Hunt

Muppet Performer

Larry Jameson

Muppet Technical Design

Jerry Juhl

Screenwriter

Ann Keeba-tannenbaum

Muppet Design

Ann Keeba-tannenbaum

Muppet Builder

Ian C Kelly

Video Engineer Supervisor

Ralph Kemplen

Editor

Bernard J Kingham

Production Executive

Faye Kreinberg

Muppet Workshop Research

Tadeusz Krzanowski

Muppet Technical Design

Janet Kuhl

Muppet Builder

Janet Kuhl

Muppet Design

Charles Lagus

Underwater Photography

Harry Lange

Production Designer

Nick Laws

Assistant Director

Kathy Lazar

Muppet Design

Kathy Lazar

Muppet Builder

David Lazer

Producer

Cheryl Leigh

Script Supervisor

Leigh Malone

Art Direction

Anita Mann

Choreography

Robert Mccormack

Supervisor

Perry Mclamb

Muppet Builder

Perry Mclamb

Muppet Design

Tom Mclaughlin

Muppet Design

Tom Mclaughlin

Muppet Builder

Maria Mcnamara

Muppet Builder

Maria Mcnamara

Muppet Design

Tim Miller

Muppet Design

Tim Miller

Muppet Builder

Oswald Morris

Director Of Photography

Will Morrison

Muppet Workshop Coordinator (New York)

Brian Muehl

Muppet Performer

Kathryn Mullen

Muppet Performer

Jerry Nelson

Muppet Performer

Tom Newby

Muppet Design

Tom Newby

Muppet Builder

Chris Newman

2nd Assistant Director

Richard L O'connor

Production Executive

Danielle Obinger

Costumes (Muppets)

Frank Oz

Muppet Performer

Frank Oz

Producer

Tom Patchett

Screenwriter

Bob Payne

Muppet Performer

Connie Peterson

Muppet Design

Connie Peterson

Muppet Builder

Mike Quinn

Muppet Performer

Joe Raposo

Music Conductor

Joe Raposo

Music; Music Director

Joe Raposo

Music Arranger

Joe Raposo

Original Music

Joe Raposo

Lyrics

John Richards

Sound Recording (Music), Sound Rerecording (Music)

Monica Rogers

Production Assistant

Jack Rose

Screenwriter

Tim Rose

Muppet Technical Design

Bill Rowe

Sound Rerecording

Bruce Sharman

Associate Producer

Colin Skeaping

Stunt Coordinator

Brian Smithies

Special Effects Supervisor

Carol Spier

Costumes (Muppets)

Hugh Spight

Muppet Performer

Caroll Spinney

Muppet Performer

Martin Starger

Executive Producer

Nicholas Stevenson

Sound Editor

Mary Strieff

Costumes (Muppets)

Peter Sutton

Sound Recording

Dusty Symonds

1st Assistant Director

Jay Tarses

Screenwriter

Donald Toms

Production Supervisor

Jim Tyler

Orchestration

Graham Walker

Music Coordinator

Albert Werry

Aerial Photography

Steve Whitmire

Muppet Performer

Caroly Wilcox

Muppet Design

Caroly Wilcox

Supervisor

Marc Wolff

Helicopter Pilot

Film Details

Also Known As
Great Muppet Caper
MPAA Rating
Release Date
1981
Production Company
Itc Entertainment Group
Distribution Company
Itc Entertainment Group; The Jim Henson Company

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 37m

Award Nominations

Best Song

1981

Articles

Sir Peter Ustinov (1921-2004)


Sir Peter Ustinov, the witty, multi-talented actor, director and writer whose 60-year career in entertainment included two Best Supporting Actor Oscars® for his memorable character turns in the films Spartacus and Topkapi, died of heart failure on March 28 at a clinic in Genolier, Switzerland. He was 82.

He was born Peter Alexander Ustinov on April 16, 1921 in London, England. His father was a press attache at the German embassy until 1935 - when disgusted by the Nazi regime - he took out British nationality. He attended Westminster School, an exclusive private school in central London until he was 16. He then enrolled for acting classes at the London Theater Studio, and by 1939, he made his London stage debut.

His jovial nature and strong gift for dialects made him a natural player for films, and it wasn't long after finding theatre work that Ustinov moved into motion pictures: a Dutch priest in Michael Powell's One of Our Aircraft is Missing (1941); an elderly Czech professor in Let the People Sing (1942); and a star pupil of a Nazi spy school in The Goose Steps Out (1942).

He served in the British Army for four years (1942-46), where he found his talents well utilized by the military, allowing him to join the director Sir Carol Reed on some propaganda films. He eventually earned his first screenwriting credit for The Way Ahead (1944). One of Sir Carol Reed's best films, The Way Ahead was a thrilling drama which starred David Niven as a civilian heading up a group of locals to resist an oncoming Nazi unit. It was enough of a hit to earn Ustinov his first film directorial assignment, School for Secrets (1946), a well paced drama about the discovery of radar starring Sir Ralph Richardson and Sir Richard Attenborough.

After the war, Ustinov took on another writer-director project Vice Versa (1948), a whimsical fantasy-comedy starring Roger Livesey and Anthony Newley as a father and son who magically switch personalities. Although not a huge hit of its day, the sheer buoyancy of the surreal premise has earned the film a large cult following.

Ustinov made his Hollywood debut, and garnered his first Oscar® nomination for Best Supporting Actor, as an indolent Nero in the Roman epic, Quo Vadis? (1951). After achieving some international popularity with that role, Ustinov gave some top-notch performances in quality films: the snappish Prinny in the Stewart Granger vehicle Beau Brummel (1954); holding his own against Humphrey Bogart as an escaped convict in We're No Angels (1954); the ring master who presides over the life of the lead character in Max Ophuls's resplendent Lola Montez (1955); and a garrulous settler coping with the Australian outback in The Sundowners (1960).

The '60s would be Ustinov's most fruitful decade. He started off gabbing his first Oscar® as the cunning slave dealer in Spartacus (1960); made a smooth screen adaptation by directing his smash play, Romanoff and Juliet (1961), earned critical acclaim for his co-adaptation, direction, production and performance in Herman Melville's nautical classic Billy Budd (1962); and earned a second Oscar® as the fumbling jewel thief in the crime comedy Topkapi (1964).

He scored another Oscar® nomination in the Best Original Screenplay category for his airy, clever crime romp Hot Millions (1968), in which he played a con artist who uses a computer to bilk a company out of millions of dollars; but after that, Ustinov began taking a string of offbeat character parts: the lead in one of Disney's better kiddie flicks Blackbeard's Ghost (1968); a Mexican General who wants to reclaim Texas for Mexico in Viva Max! (1969); an old man who survives the ravaged planet of the future in Logan's Run (1976); and an unfortunate turn as a Chinese stereotype in Charlie Chan and the Curse of the Dragon Queen (1981). Still, he did achieve renewed popularity when he took on the role of Hercule Poirot in the star laced, Agatha Christie extravaganza Death on the Nile (1978). He was such a hit, that he would adroitly play the Belgian detective in two more theatrical movies: Evil Under the Sun (1982) and Appointment With Death (1988); as well as three television movies: Thirteen at Dinner (1985), Murder in Three Acts, Dead Man's Folly (both 1986).

Beyond his work in films, Ustinov was justifiably praised for his humanitarian work - most notably as the unpaid, goodwill ambassador for United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF). Since 1968, he had traveled to all corners of the globe: China, Russia, Myanmar, Cambodia, Kenya, Egypt, Thailand and numerous other countries to promote and host many benefit concerts for the agency.

Ustinov, who in 1990 earned a knighthood for his artistic and humanitarian contributions, is survived by his wife of 32 years, Hélène du Lau d'Allemans; three daughters, Tamara, Pavla, Andrea; and a son, Igor.

by Michael T. Toole
Sir Peter Ustinov (1921-2004)

Sir Peter Ustinov (1921-2004)

Sir Peter Ustinov, the witty, multi-talented actor, director and writer whose 60-year career in entertainment included two Best Supporting Actor Oscars® for his memorable character turns in the films Spartacus and Topkapi, died of heart failure on March 28 at a clinic in Genolier, Switzerland. He was 82. He was born Peter Alexander Ustinov on April 16, 1921 in London, England. His father was a press attache at the German embassy until 1935 - when disgusted by the Nazi regime - he took out British nationality. He attended Westminster School, an exclusive private school in central London until he was 16. He then enrolled for acting classes at the London Theater Studio, and by 1939, he made his London stage debut. His jovial nature and strong gift for dialects made him a natural player for films, and it wasn't long after finding theatre work that Ustinov moved into motion pictures: a Dutch priest in Michael Powell's One of Our Aircraft is Missing (1941); an elderly Czech professor in Let the People Sing (1942); and a star pupil of a Nazi spy school in The Goose Steps Out (1942). He served in the British Army for four years (1942-46), where he found his talents well utilized by the military, allowing him to join the director Sir Carol Reed on some propaganda films. He eventually earned his first screenwriting credit for The Way Ahead (1944). One of Sir Carol Reed's best films, The Way Ahead was a thrilling drama which starred David Niven as a civilian heading up a group of locals to resist an oncoming Nazi unit. It was enough of a hit to earn Ustinov his first film directorial assignment, School for Secrets (1946), a well paced drama about the discovery of radar starring Sir Ralph Richardson and Sir Richard Attenborough. After the war, Ustinov took on another writer-director project Vice Versa (1948), a whimsical fantasy-comedy starring Roger Livesey and Anthony Newley as a father and son who magically switch personalities. Although not a huge hit of its day, the sheer buoyancy of the surreal premise has earned the film a large cult following. Ustinov made his Hollywood debut, and garnered his first Oscar® nomination for Best Supporting Actor, as an indolent Nero in the Roman epic, Quo Vadis? (1951). After achieving some international popularity with that role, Ustinov gave some top-notch performances in quality films: the snappish Prinny in the Stewart Granger vehicle Beau Brummel (1954); holding his own against Humphrey Bogart as an escaped convict in We're No Angels (1954); the ring master who presides over the life of the lead character in Max Ophuls's resplendent Lola Montez (1955); and a garrulous settler coping with the Australian outback in The Sundowners (1960). The '60s would be Ustinov's most fruitful decade. He started off gabbing his first Oscar® as the cunning slave dealer in Spartacus (1960); made a smooth screen adaptation by directing his smash play, Romanoff and Juliet (1961), earned critical acclaim for his co-adaptation, direction, production and performance in Herman Melville's nautical classic Billy Budd (1962); and earned a second Oscar® as the fumbling jewel thief in the crime comedy Topkapi (1964). He scored another Oscar® nomination in the Best Original Screenplay category for his airy, clever crime romp Hot Millions (1968), in which he played a con artist who uses a computer to bilk a company out of millions of dollars; but after that, Ustinov began taking a string of offbeat character parts: the lead in one of Disney's better kiddie flicks Blackbeard's Ghost (1968); a Mexican General who wants to reclaim Texas for Mexico in Viva Max! (1969); an old man who survives the ravaged planet of the future in Logan's Run (1976); and an unfortunate turn as a Chinese stereotype in Charlie Chan and the Curse of the Dragon Queen (1981). Still, he did achieve renewed popularity when he took on the role of Hercule Poirot in the star laced, Agatha Christie extravaganza Death on the Nile (1978). He was such a hit, that he would adroitly play the Belgian detective in two more theatrical movies: Evil Under the Sun (1982) and Appointment With Death (1988); as well as three television movies: Thirteen at Dinner (1985), Murder in Three Acts, Dead Man's Folly (both 1986). Beyond his work in films, Ustinov was justifiably praised for his humanitarian work - most notably as the unpaid, goodwill ambassador for United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF). Since 1968, he had traveled to all corners of the globe: China, Russia, Myanmar, Cambodia, Kenya, Egypt, Thailand and numerous other countries to promote and host many benefit concerts for the agency. Ustinov, who in 1990 earned a knighthood for his artistic and humanitarian contributions, is survived by his wife of 32 years, Hélène du Lau d'Allemans; three daughters, Tamara, Pavla, Andrea; and a son, Igor. by Michael T. Toole

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Summer June 1981

Re-released in United States on Video March 24, 1995

Released in United States Summer June 1981

Re-released in United States on Video March 24, 1995