Gorillas in the Mist


2h 20m 1988
Gorillas in the Mist

Brief Synopsis

Nature lover Dian Fossey risks her life to study and protect gorillas in the wild.

Film Details

Also Known As
Gorilas en la niebla, Gorille dans la brume, dimhöljda bergens gorillor
MPAA Rating
Genre
Drama
Adventure
Biography
Nature
Release Date
1988
Production Company
Guber/Peters Company; Joe Dunton & Company International, Inc.; Universal Pictures; Warner Bros. Pictures
Distribution Company
Universal Pictures; Mca Home Video; StudioCanal; Universal Pictures; Warner Bros. Pictures International
Location
Lee International Studios, Shepperton, England, United Kingdom; Aberdare Mountains, Kenya; Rwanda; Nairobi, Kenya

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 20m

Synopsis

The story of anthropologist Dian Fossey, centering around the extensive work she accomplished with gorillas, and her murder in Rwanda in 1985.

Crew

Edna Alexander

Song ("Sugar")

Barbara Allen

Location Manager (Rwanda)

Jennifer Alward

Consultant

Helen Archer

Casting (Kenya)

Stuart Artingstall

Special Effects Hair Designer

Stuart Baird

Editor

Rick Baker

Associate Producer

Rick Baker

Special Makeup Effects

Dave Barbour

Song ("It'S A Good Day")

Ray Barrett

Construction Manager

Chrissie Beveridge

Makeup Supervisor

Lucy Boulting

Casting Assistant

Elaine Bowerbank

Hairdresser

Richard Brierley

Other

Chris Brock

Assistant Director

Donald D Brown

Sound Maintenance

Rona Brown

Animal Trainer

Robin Browne

Camera Operator (Special Effects)

Steve Burgess

Other

Johnny Butler

Dressing Props

Bob Campbell

Special Photography

Bob Campbell

Technical Advisor

Rosamund Carr

Technical Advisor

Rosamund Carr

Assistance

Nobby Clark

Construction Floor (Standby)

Stephanie Clark

Other

Robin Clarke

Music Editor

Patrick Clayton

Assistant Director

Terence Clegg

Producer

Murray Close

Stills

Stacey Coil

Assistance (Digit Fund)

Mark Condiotti

Assistance (Mountain Gorilla Project)

Stephen Cooper

Art Direction Assistant

Ken Court

Art Direction

Con Cremins

Location Accountant

Kenny Crouch

Wardrobe Master

Susan D'arcy

Publicist

Bruce Davidson

Other

Roger Deer

Sketch Artist

David Docker

Sound Editor Assistant

Cordelia Donahoe

Other

Marion Dougherty

Casting

Al Dubin

Song ("September In The Rain")

Michele Archambault Dulman

Assistant (To Arnold Glimcher)

Arthur Dunne

Transportation Manager

Harry Eckford

Key Grip

Peter Elliott

Choreography (Mime Artist)

Danny Evans

Props

John Fletcher

Other

Vic Floyd

Other

Dian Fossey

Other

Harold Fryer

Construction Floor (Standby)

Reg Garside

Gaffer

Pat Gilbert

Sound Editor Assistant

Mark Gill

Assistant Editor

Arne Glimcher

Producer

John Graysmark

Production Designer

Carl Griffin

Location Accountant

Peter Guber

Executive Producer

Peter Handford

Sound Recording Mixer

Jamie Harcourt

Camera Operator

David Harris

Special Effects Supervisor

Kevin Harris

Construction Supervisor

Bernard Harvey-langton

Dressing Props

Harold T P Hayes

Source Material (From Article)

Camilla Henneman

Special Costume Key Person

Tom Hester

Makeup Effects Designer

Martin Hitchcock

Art Direction Assistant

Mary Holdsworth

Script Supervisor

Robin Hollister

Other

Robin Hollister

Special Assistant

Fanny Jakubowicz

Wardrobe Assistant

Allan James

Location Manager (Kenya)

Colin Jamison

Chief Hairdresser

Maurice Jarre

Music

Lisa M Johnson

Wardrobe Assistant

George K Kabiru

Other

Babu Kamau

Production Runner

Dennis Kane

Consultant

Laurie Kerr

Construction Manager Assistant

Judy Kessler

Co-Producer

Dave Kindlon

Special Effects Mechnical Designer

Leila Kirkpatrick

Production Coordinator

John Lanzer

Production Buyer

Peggy Lee

Song ("It'S A Good Day")

Peggy Lee

Song Performer ("September In The Rain" "It'S A Good Day" "Sugar")

Jason Lehel

Other

Catherine Leterrier

Costume Designer

Gerry Levy

Unit Manager (Studio)

Tim Lewis

Assistant Director

Archie Ludski

Dialogue Editor

Ted Lynch

Construction Floor (Standby)

Steve Mason

Camera Operator

Diane Mcmeekin

Assistance (African Wildlife Foundation)

Ray Meehan

Bestboy

Sidney D. Mitchell

Song ("Sugar")

Joel Moss

Music Recording

Robert Mugemana

Assistant Director

Tab Murphy

Story By

Tab Murphy

From Story

Phil Murray

Construction Floor (Standby)

Andy Nelson

Sound Rerecording Mixer

Pat Newcombe

Publicity Coordinator

Robert Nixon

Co-Producer

Phil Notaro

Special Effects Mechanical Designer

Deo Ntakirutimana

Production Assistant

Dr. Perez Olinda

Assistance (Wildlife Conservation And Management Department)

Cecilia Penasse

Production Assistant (Location)

Pat Pennelegion

Production Coordinator

Jon Peters

Executive Producer

Anna Hamilton Phelan

Story By

Anna Hamilton Phelan

From Story

Anna Hamilton Phelan

Screenwriter

Rocky Phelan

Foley Editor

Maceo Pinkard

Song ("Sugar")

Keith Pitt

Props

Ann Pollack

Assistant (To Michael Apted)

Anna Reinhardt

Assistant (To Producers)

Michael Roberts

Camera Operator

Roger Robson

Other

Alan Root

Special Photography (Gorillas/Zaire)

Monty Ruben

Location Liaison (Kenya)

Christine Samways

Deputy Accountant

Brian Saunders

Sound Rerecording Mixer Assistant

Matthew Scudamore

Floor Runner

John Seale

Dp/Cinematographer

John Seale

Director Of Photography

Mary Selway

Casting

David Sharpe

Sound Editor Assistant

David Sharpe

Sound Editor

Don Sharpe

Sound Editor Supervisor

Steve Short

Props

Alex Shoumatoff

Consultant

Steve Sleap

Puppeteer

Steve Sleap

Other

Keith Stack

Location Unit Doctor

John Stevenson

Boom Operator

Karen Tangaere

Script Supervisor Assistant

Paul Thompson

Key Grip

Richard Tindall

Other

John Trehy

Other

Simon Trevor

Camera Operator

Barbara Tyack

Assistant (To Simon Trevor)

Thierry Verrier

Location Manager Assistant (Rwanda)

Simon Wakefield

Set Decorator

Harry Warren

Song ("September In The Rain")

Dr. David Watts

Assistance (Karisoke Research Station)

Julia Waye

Production Runner

Norma Webb

Makeup

Russ Woolnough

1st Assistant Editor

Paul Zydel

Adr Mixer

Film Details

Also Known As
Gorilas en la niebla, Gorille dans la brume, dimhöljda bergens gorillor
MPAA Rating
Genre
Drama
Adventure
Biography
Nature
Release Date
1988
Production Company
Guber/Peters Company; Joe Dunton & Company International, Inc.; Universal Pictures; Warner Bros. Pictures
Distribution Company
Universal Pictures; Mca Home Video; StudioCanal; Universal Pictures; Warner Bros. Pictures International
Location
Lee International Studios, Shepperton, England, United Kingdom; Aberdare Mountains, Kenya; Rwanda; Nairobi, Kenya

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 20m

Award Nominations

Best Actress

1988
Sigourney Weaver

Best Adapted Screenplay

1988

Best Editing

1988
Stuart Baird

Best Score

1988

Best Sound

1988

Articles

Gorillas in the Mist


Gorillas in the Mist (1988) is the story of famed naturalist Dian Fossey's ultimately fatal struggle to protect wild Rwandan gorillas from poachers. The film was directed by Michael Apted from a screenplay by Anna Hamilton Phelan, based on an article by Harold T.P Hayes, the work of Dian Fossey, and a story Phelan had written with Tab Murphy. Sigourney Weaver was chosen to play Fossey, with her love interest played by Bryan Brown. Also in the cast were Julie Harris and John Omirah Miluwi.

In 1985, Universal and producer Arne Glimcher had purchased the rights to Fossey's 1983 memoir Gorillas in the Mist . Universal wasn't the only studio interested - Warner Bros. had their own Fossey film in pre-production, based on an article by Harold Hayes for Life magazine. Rather than battle it out, the two studios decided on a co-production, with the screenplay based on both sources. In December 1985, Glimcher traveled to Rwanda to meet with Fossey in preparation for the film. Just hours before they were to meet, Dian Fossey was murdered in her bedroom.

With a very modest $12 million budget, filming took place in various location in Africa, as well as two months in Rwanda at Fossey's Karisoke Research Centre, which was 12,000 feet above sea level. Base camp had to be established at 8,500 feet, so everyone had to hike 4,000 feet each day with their gear through the brush and cold. They could only shoot with the gorillas for one hour a day because of government restrictions on the number of humans who could be with the gorillas at a time. As a result, there were only five people with Weaver during those shots. Other scenes were done with stuntmen wearing gorilla suits created by legendary makeup artist Rick Baker, who had worked on Michael Jackson's Thriller video, as well as many major motion pictures.

Karisoke was a tough location shoot; in those days there was no phone service or mail, so producer Terence Clegg had to hire 400 Rwandans to bring mail and packages up the mountain. Because lions still roamed the area, park rangers with rifles were constantly on patrol.

When the film was released in the fall of 1988, Roger Ebert lauded Weaver's performance, writing "It is impossible to imagine a more appropriate choice for the role," but, like many other critics, including Hal Hanson of The Washington Post, Ebert felt that the film "tells us what Dian Fossey accomplished and what happened to her, but doesn't tell us who she was, and at the end that's what we want to know."

Although the film was nominated for five Academy Awards™ - Best Actress for Weaver, Best Writing, Screenplay Based on Material from Another Medium for Anna Hamilton Phelan and Tab Murphy, Best Sound for Andy Nelson and his crew, Best Film Editing for Stuart Baird and Best Music, Original Score for Maurice Jarre, Gorillas in the Mist didn't win a single Oscar™. Weaver and Jarre would go on to win Golden Globes in their respective categories.

Sigourney Weaver was so moved by her experience while making this film that she started an "adopt-a-gorilla" campaign to fund research at the Karisoke Research Centre and to fund patrols to stop gorilla poaching. She called it "The Digit Fund," after the gorilla that was killed by poachers in 1977, made famous by Dian Fossey. She and producer Arnold Glimcher "adopted" Maggie, one of the gorillas used in the film. In 2008, twenty years after filming Gorillas in the Mist , Sigourney Weaver returned to Karisoke with a BBC documentary crew. She found that many of the gorillas had survived, and the population had risen to around 700. Sadly, many of the Rwandans she had worked with had been killed or had disappeared and were presumed dead after the genocide in 1994. As for the murder of Dian Fossey, a Rwandan court tried and convicted her assistant Wayne McGuire in absentia for the killing. McGuire, however, had returned to the United States, and because there was no extradition treaty with Rwanda, McGuire has never served his sentence.

SOURCES:

Ebert, Roger "Gorillas in the Mist Buries Weaver's Character in the Jungle" Moscow-Pullman Daily News 13 Oct 88
The Internet Movie Database
''Mist' Actress Starts Adopt-A-Gorilla'" Ocala Star-Banner 28 Oct 88
http://news.moviefone.com/2013/09/21/gorillas-in-the-mist-sigourney-weaver/

By Lorraine LoBianco
Gorillas In The Mist

Gorillas in the Mist

Gorillas in the Mist (1988) is the story of famed naturalist Dian Fossey's ultimately fatal struggle to protect wild Rwandan gorillas from poachers. The film was directed by Michael Apted from a screenplay by Anna Hamilton Phelan, based on an article by Harold T.P Hayes, the work of Dian Fossey, and a story Phelan had written with Tab Murphy. Sigourney Weaver was chosen to play Fossey, with her love interest played by Bryan Brown. Also in the cast were Julie Harris and John Omirah Miluwi. In 1985, Universal and producer Arne Glimcher had purchased the rights to Fossey's 1983 memoir Gorillas in the Mist . Universal wasn't the only studio interested - Warner Bros. had their own Fossey film in pre-production, based on an article by Harold Hayes for Life magazine. Rather than battle it out, the two studios decided on a co-production, with the screenplay based on both sources. In December 1985, Glimcher traveled to Rwanda to meet with Fossey in preparation for the film. Just hours before they were to meet, Dian Fossey was murdered in her bedroom. With a very modest $12 million budget, filming took place in various location in Africa, as well as two months in Rwanda at Fossey's Karisoke Research Centre, which was 12,000 feet above sea level. Base camp had to be established at 8,500 feet, so everyone had to hike 4,000 feet each day with their gear through the brush and cold. They could only shoot with the gorillas for one hour a day because of government restrictions on the number of humans who could be with the gorillas at a time. As a result, there were only five people with Weaver during those shots. Other scenes were done with stuntmen wearing gorilla suits created by legendary makeup artist Rick Baker, who had worked on Michael Jackson's Thriller video, as well as many major motion pictures. Karisoke was a tough location shoot; in those days there was no phone service or mail, so producer Terence Clegg had to hire 400 Rwandans to bring mail and packages up the mountain. Because lions still roamed the area, park rangers with rifles were constantly on patrol. When the film was released in the fall of 1988, Roger Ebert lauded Weaver's performance, writing "It is impossible to imagine a more appropriate choice for the role," but, like many other critics, including Hal Hanson of The Washington Post, Ebert felt that the film "tells us what Dian Fossey accomplished and what happened to her, but doesn't tell us who she was, and at the end that's what we want to know." Although the film was nominated for five Academy Awards™ - Best Actress for Weaver, Best Writing, Screenplay Based on Material from Another Medium for Anna Hamilton Phelan and Tab Murphy, Best Sound for Andy Nelson and his crew, Best Film Editing for Stuart Baird and Best Music, Original Score for Maurice Jarre, Gorillas in the Mist didn't win a single Oscar™. Weaver and Jarre would go on to win Golden Globes in their respective categories. Sigourney Weaver was so moved by her experience while making this film that she started an "adopt-a-gorilla" campaign to fund research at the Karisoke Research Centre and to fund patrols to stop gorilla poaching. She called it "The Digit Fund," after the gorilla that was killed by poachers in 1977, made famous by Dian Fossey. She and producer Arnold Glimcher "adopted" Maggie, one of the gorillas used in the film. In 2008, twenty years after filming Gorillas in the Mist , Sigourney Weaver returned to Karisoke with a BBC documentary crew. She found that many of the gorillas had survived, and the population had risen to around 700. Sadly, many of the Rwandans she had worked with had been killed or had disappeared and were presumed dead after the genocide in 1994. As for the murder of Dian Fossey, a Rwandan court tried and convicted her assistant Wayne McGuire in absentia for the killing. McGuire, however, had returned to the United States, and because there was no extradition treaty with Rwanda, McGuire has never served his sentence. SOURCES: Ebert, Roger "Gorillas in the Mist Buries Weaver's Character in the Jungle" Moscow-Pullman Daily News 13 Oct 88 The Internet Movie Database ''Mist' Actress Starts Adopt-A-Gorilla'" Ocala Star-Banner 28 Oct 88 http://news.moviefone.com/2013/09/21/gorillas-in-the-mist-sigourney-weaver/ By Lorraine LoBianco

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Limited Release in United States September 23, 1988

Released in United States Fall September 23, 1988

Released in United States July 1989

Released in United States on Video April 13, 1989

Released in United States September 14, 1988

Wide Release in United States September 30, 1988

Shown at Moscow International Film Festival (market) July 7-18, 1989.

Shown at Toronto Festival of Festivals September 14, 1988.

Began shooting June 1, 1987.

Completed shooting October 1987.

Released in United States on Video April 13, 1989

Released in United States September 14, 1988 (Shown at Toronto Festival of Festivals September 14, 1988.)

Limited Release in United States September 23, 1988

Released in United States Fall September 23, 1988

Wide Release in United States September 30, 1988

Released in United States July 1989 (Shown at Moscow International Film Festival (market) July 7-18, 1989.)