Goodfellas


2h 26m 1990
Goodfellas

Brief Synopsis

A young man works his way up through the New York City mobs.

Film Details

Also Known As
Les Affranchis, Maffiabröder, Uno de los nuestros, affranchis
MPAA Rating
Genre
Drama
Crime
Biography
Adaptation
Release Date
1990
Distribution Company
WARNER BROS. PICTURES DISTRIBUTION (WBPD)/WARNER BROS. PICTURES INTERNATIONAL (WBI)
Location
Queens, New York City, New York, USA; Fort Lee, New Jersey, USA; New York City, New York, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 26m

Synopsis

Follow the true tale of mobster and FBI informant Henry Hill. The Brooklyn native rises to the upper crust of Brooklyn's notorious mafia then endures a long fall to the bottom of addiction, infidelity, and incarceration.

Cast

Robert De Niro

Ray Liotta

Joe Pesci

Lorraine Bracco

Michael Imperioli

Larry Silvestri

Clem Caserta

Margo Winkler

Suzanne Shepherd

Steve Forleo

Lou Eppolito

Joel Blake

Catherine Scorsese

Nicole Burdette

Jesse Kirtzman

Anthony Valentin

Paula Gallo

Joseph D'onofrio

Robbie Vinton

Welker White

Isiah Whitlock

Ruby Gaynor

Lisa Dapolito

Vito Picone

Julie Garfield

Jerry Vale

Himself

Manny Alfaro

Adam Wandt

Gaetano Logiudice

Ronald Maccone

Elizabeth Whitcraft

Gina Mastrogiacomo

Dino Laudicina

Russell Halley

Paul Sorvino

Tony Ellis

Janis Corsair

Erasmus C Alfano

Thomas Hewson

Vincent Pastore

Richard Dioguardi

Katherine Wallach

Joel Calendrillo

Vito Antuofermo

Edward D Murphy

Michael Calandrino

Charles Scorsese

Chuck Low

Gina Mattia

John Ciarcia

Edward Mcdonald

Himself

Anthony Polemeni

Richard Mullally

Debi Mazar

Vito Balsamo

Tony Sirico

Tony Darrow

Stella Kietel

Vincent Gallo

Joseph Gioco

James Quattrochi

Andrew Scudiero

Angela Pietropinto

Daniela Barbosa

Michelangelo Graziano

Peter Fain

Kevin Corrigan

Paul Mcissac

Frank Aquilino

Margaux Guerard

Philip Suriano

Thomas Lowry

Illeana Douglas

Christopher Serrone

Beau Starr

Thomas E Camuti

John Williams

Frank Albanese

Mike Contessa

Michael Citriniti

H Clay Dear

Mikey Black

Victor Colicchio

Spencer Bradley

Tony Lip

Frank Sivero

Fran Mcgee

Bob Altman

Norman Barbera

Melissa Prophet

John Manca

Richard Dietl (bo)

Peter Cicale

Garry Blackwood

Marianne Leone

Bob Golub

Berlinda Tolbert

Jamie Deroy

Peter Hock

Frank Dileo

Tobin Bell

Gayle Lewis

Alyson Jones

Samuel L. Jackson

Joseph Bono

Gene Canfield

Paul Herman

Dominique Devito

Marie Michaels

Gaetano Lisi

Daniel P Conte

Nancy Cassaro

Edward Hayes

Ed Deacy

Anthony Alessandro

Frank Adonis

John Dibenedetto

Mark Evan Jacobs

Elaine Kagan

Johnny Williams

Mike Starr

Tony Conforti

Paul Mougey

Peter Onorati

Susan Varon

Anthony Powers

Margaret Smith

Violet Gaynor

Luke Walter

Frank Vincent

Joanna Bennett

Henny Youngman

Himself

Nadine Kay

Lawrence Sacco

Frank Pellegrino

Lo Nardo

Irving Welzer

Crew

Richard Adler

Song

Maher Ahmad

Art Director

Robert Allen

Song

Steve Allen

Song

Arthur Altman

Song

Todd Arnow

Production Accountant

Amy Auchincloss

Assistant Editor

Burt Bacharach

Song

Florian Ballhaus

Assistant Camera Operator

Michael Ballhaus

Other

Michael Ballhaus

Director Of Photography

Richard Barrett

Song

Jeff Barry

Song

Elaine Bass

Titles

Saul Bass

Titles

Robert Bateman

Song

Tony Bennett

Song Performer

Michael Berenbaum

Sound Editor

Cesare Andrea Bixio

Song

Kent Blocher

Assistant Editor

Leslie Bloom

Set Decorator

Ron Bochar

Foley Editor

Vebe Borge

Assistant Director

Sharon A Briggs

Assistant

Conrad Brink

Special Effects

Christopher S Brooks

Music Editor

Richard Bruno

Costume Designer

Jennifer L Bryan

Wardrobe

Paul Bucossi

Stunts

Pete Bucossi

Stunts

Al Byron

Song

Sammy Cahn

Song

Hoagy Carmichael

Song

Cesarini

Song

Robin Chambers

Assistant

Raul Cita

Song

Eric Clapton

Song Performer

Dermot Conley

Assistant

Danny Coss

Location Assistant

Herbert Cox

Song

Janet Crosby

Production Associate

Alesandra M Cuomo

Production Coordinator

Bill Curry

Transportation Captain

Betty Curtis

Song Performer

Alan D'angerio

Hair

Bobby Darin

Song Performer

Hal David

Song

Barbara De Fina

Executive Producer

Jerry Deblau

Gaffer

Jerry Deblau

Lighting Technician

Michael Decasper

Production Assistant

Giuseppe Distefano

Song Performer

William Docker

Sound Editor

Norman Douglass

Stunts

Al Dubin

Song

David Dunlap

Camera Operator

Ernie Erdman

Song

Paul Evans

Song

Roy Farfel

Stunts

William Farley

Hair

Ted Fio Rito

Song

Susan Fiore

Dga Trainee

John Fisher

Production Assistant

Brian Fitzsimons

Grip

Tom Fleischman

Sound

John R Ford

Property Master Assistant

Aretha Franklin

Song Performer

Alan Freed

Song

Carl Fullerton

Makeup

Harvey Fuqua

Song

Dennis Gamiello

Key Grip

Nicholas J Giangiulio

Stunts

Norman Gimbel

Song

Michele Giordano

Production Associate

Frank Graziadei

Sound

Ellie Greenwich

Song

Robert Griffon

Property Master

Tony Guida

Stunts

Amy Herman

Location Assistant

Ilona Herman

Makeup

Ilona Herman

Hair

Mildred Hill

Song

Patty Hill

Song

Brian Holland

Song

Larry Huston

Other

Dean Jackson

Wardrobe Supervisor

Rudy Jackson

Song

Mick Jagger

Song

Brian Johnson

Sound Editor

Jack Jones

Song Performer

Julia Judge

Assistant

Gus Kahn

Song

Thomas L Keller

Assistant

Frank Kern

Foley Editor

Bruce Kitzmeyer

Dialogue Editor

James Kwei

Editor

Jack Lawrence

Song

Robert Leddy

Transportation Captain

Donovan Leitch

Song Performer

Donovan Leitch

Song

David Leonard

Assistant Editor

Morris Levy

Song

Cayle Lewis

Production Assistant

Ellen Lewis

Casting

Skip Lievsay

Sound Editor

Marissa Littlefield

Dialogue Editor

Caryl Loeb

Scenic Artist

John B Lowry

Grip

Deborah Lupard

Assistant Director

John Manca

Technical Advisor

Bobby Mancuso

Assistant Camera Operator

Barry Mann

Song

Dean Martin

Song Performer

Johnny Mathis

Song Performer

Edward Mcdonald

Other

John Mcdonnell

Property Master Assistant

David I Miller

Production Assistant

Mogal

Song

George Morton

Song

Esther Navarro

Song

Phil Neilson

Stunts

Enrico Neri

Song

Jan Nizen

Assistant

Heather Norton

Production Assistant

Susan O'donnell

Assistant

Arne Olsen

Foreman

Stephen R Pacca

Other

Sheila Paige

Script Supervisor

Janet Paparazzo

Stunts

Mitchell Parish

Song

John Petraglia

Lighting Technician

Don Picard

Stunts

Nicholas Pileggi

Screenplay

Nicholas Pileggi

Book As Source Material

Susan Pileggi

Other

Tony Polizzi

Assistant

Bruce Pross

Foley Editor

Bruce Pustin

Associate Producer

Bruce Pustin

Unit Production Manager

Eddie Ray

Song

Raye

Song

Joseph Reidy

Assistant Director

Keith Richard

Song

Del Roma

Song

Miguel Romero

Assistant

Steve Rose

Location Manager

Fred Rosenberg

Dialogue Editor

Laura Rosenthal

Casting Associate

Jerry Ross

Song

Mike Russo

Stunt Coordinator

Mike Russo

Stunts

James Sabat

Sound Mixer

Louis Sabat

Boom Operator

Louis Sanchez

Construction Coordinator

Anne Sawyer

Sound Editor

Thelma Schoonmaker

Editor

Martin Scorsese

Screenplay

Ronny Shannon

Song

Gail Showalter

Adr Editor

Phil Spector

Song

Robin Standefer

Artistic Advisor

Jeff Stern

Dialogue Editor

Alex Stevens

Stunts

William Stevenson

Song

Al Stillman

Song

Philip Stockton

Dialogue Editor

J W Stole

Song

Bruce E Swanson

On-Set Dresser

Christopher Swartout

Production Assistant

Neri Kyle Tannenbaum

Location Assistant

The Moonglows

Song Performer

Toang

Song

Charles Trenet

Song

Jerry Vale

Other

Jerry Vale

Song Performer

James Van Heusen

Song

Bobby Vinton

Song Performer

Bill Ward

Song Performer

Harry Warren

Song

Cynthia Weil

Song

Allen Weisinger

Makeup

Harvey Weiss

Song

Barry Wetcher

Photography

Robert Lee Whitlock

Craft Service

Otis Williams

Song Performer

Irwin Winkler

Producer

Steve Wright

Camera Trainee

Henny Youngman

Other

Kristi Zea

Production Designer

Film Details

Also Known As
Les Affranchis, Maffiabröder, Uno de los nuestros, affranchis
MPAA Rating
Genre
Drama
Crime
Biography
Adaptation
Release Date
1990
Distribution Company
WARNER BROS. PICTURES DISTRIBUTION (WBPD)/WARNER BROS. PICTURES INTERNATIONAL (WBI)
Location
Queens, New York City, New York, USA; Fort Lee, New Jersey, USA; New York City, New York, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 26m

Award Wins

Best Supporting Actor

1990
Joe Pesci

Award Nominations

Best Adapted Screenplay

1990

Best Director

1990
Martin Scorsese

Best Editing

1990
Thelma Schoonmaker

Best Picture

1990

Best Supporting Actress

1990
Lorraine Bracco

Articles

Goodfellas


It has been rated by various polls as among the 100 greatest movies of all times and the second greatest gangster film ever; fans can recite sections of scenes verbatim, and lines from it have been ranked among the greatest bits of dialogue in movie history; critics, filmmakers, and admirers have argued that it deserves a place equal to director Martin Scorsese's acknowledged masterpiece Raging Bull (1980). And, in 2000, Goodfellas (1990) was selected by the National Film Preservation Board to be one of the cinema treasures preserved in the National Film Registry of the Library of Congress. Not bad for a movie that initial preview audiences either walked out of in disgust or commented on with extreme negativity.

As much as its style, characters, and subject matter have become identified with its creator, Scorsese has said he never had a desire to make just another mob movie. The Godfather saga had already indelibly stamped the genre with perhaps its greatest myth almost 20 years earlier, and any number of imitators of Francis Ford Coppola's epic have looked at the Mafia from a wide range of angles over the years. What grabbed Scorsese's eye, however, was journalist Nicholas Pileggi's 1986 book Wiseguy: Life in a Mafia Family, which in its true story of mobster-turned-informant Henry Hill focused on the ordinary "soldier" rather than the larger-than-life bosses. Thanks to Coppola's work, the Mafia don had become a mythic figure, one whose actions and motives came to be seen as indicative of American society and corporate capitalism as a whole. With Pileggi's book, Scorsese saw an opportunity to present the story of the common thieves and killers, the guys who follow the orders and carry out the day-to-day criminal tasks. He was also excited about finding a film language that would capture the style of Pileggi's lean, tough, fast-moving journalistic prose.

The story follows Henry Hill from his teenage years, staring out the window of his family's apartment at the hoods and crooks operating out of a neighborhood storefront (much as Scorsese had done as a child in Little Italy), longing to be a part of their exciting world. Although half-Irish and therefore unqualified to ever be a "made man" (one officially inducted into the Mafia inner circle through a solemn oath), Hill eventually becomes a trusted and busy soldier of mob boss Paulie Cicero and falls in with two other henchmen, professional thief Jimmy Conway and sociopathic killer Tommy DeVito. The story also relates details of his marriage, his affair with a hotheaded mistress, and his descent into heavy cocaine use. By the end, Hill runs afoul of the law and the mob, turns state's evidence against his former associates, and ends up in the Witness Protection Program. The mere recounting of this plot, however, does little justice to Scorsese's bravura approach to the material, incorporating freeze frames and jump cuts characteristic of the French New Wave films of the early 1960s, voiceovers and direct address to the camera to amplify the action and passage of time, and the use of popular songs that has become so identified with the director's style.

Scorsese hired Pileggi to co-write the script (the first time Scorsese took writing credit since Mean Streets in 1973), and kept much of the language and details from the book intact. Pileggi credits Scorsese with a great deal of help and inspiration in the process: "He was stuck with somebody who really didn't know anything so he really had to bring me along as far as film was concerned."

For Hill's two partners in crime, Scorsese turned to the stars of Raging Bull, casting Robert De Niro as Jimmy and Joe Pesci as Tommy. Actually, he didn't think he had a part in the movie for a star of De Niro's caliber, but the actor himself suggested he play the supporting role, and his presence helped encourage the studio to boost the budget to $25 million, the most Scorsese was allotted for a production up to that point. For the central character, Henry Hill, Scorsese wanted Ray Liotta, who had never carried a major film himself but who had attracted a lot of attention for his supporting role as Melanie Griffith's dangerous ex-husband in Jonathan Demme's Something Wild (1986). Producer Irwin Winkler was against using Liotta until the actor pulled him aside for a long private talk. There's no record of what was said, but when it was over Liotta had the part.

To prepare for the part, Liotta obsessively listened to tapes of Pileggi's interview with Henry Hill while driving back and forth between New York and his parents' New Jersey home. De Niro talked personally to Hill many times about Jimmy Conway, whose real last name was Burke. According to Hill, De Niro would call him up to five times a day to discuss the minutest detail of every small action or gesture.

Arguably the film's most memorable scene, Tommy goading Henry with the threatening "How am I funny?" banter, was actually an incident that happened to Joe Pesci years before. As with many other scenes (and typical of the way Scorsese usually worked with De Niro), it was improvised between Liotta and Pesci several times, then incorporated into the script. Scorsese decided to capture it in a medium shot rather than intercutting to a lot of close-ups, so that he could get the full effect of Tommy's diatribe on all the other characters in the scene.

The cast also includes a number of actors familiar to any fan of the genre, particularly those who watched The Sopranos television series. One such player is Michael Imperioli, who played the major role of Christopher on The Sopranos, making his third feature film appearance with Goodfellas as a young man who waits on the mob guys in their social club and gets his foot shot by psycho Tommy. The creators of the TV series paid homage to this film by having Christopher do the same thing to a bakery employee and then remarking casually, "It happens."

Scorsese also used members of his own family and not for the first time. Mother Catherine makes her third appearance in one of her son's films as Tommy's mother, improvising a kitchen scene with De Niro, Liotta, and Pesci. Father Charles, in his fifth Scorsese film, plays the prisoner who gets chided for putting too many onions in the tomato sauce. Also in the cast, as Jimmy's wife, is Julie Garfield, whose father, John Garfield, often played an early prototype of the New York tough guy in his brief but memorable film career (1938-1951). And the U.S. attorney who negotiates with Karen and Henry Hill about entering the Witness Protection Program is played by Edward McDonald, the real-life federal attorney who did the actual negotiating with the Hills.

Following the popularity and critical praise for the film upon its release, Henry Hill couldn't resist letting people know he was the basis for the lead character. Some sources say this was why he was taken out of the protection program, although other sources cite multiple drug arrests as the reason. In the years since the end of this story, Hill has been, among other things, an Italian chef, and once operated a restaurant called Wise Guys. He was sentenced to two years probation for public drunkenness in March 2009. Hill is the only one of the principals in the famous 1978 Lufthansa heist (a central plot point of the film) still alive. Jimmy Burke lived to see the release of the movie (and claimed De Niro consulted with him frequently, although that has been disputed) but died in prison in 1996 of lung cancer, eight years before he would have been eligible for parole.

Goodfellas received Academy Award nominations for Best Picture, Director, Writing, Editing, and Supporting Actress (Lorraine Bracco as Karen Hill). Joe Pesci won Best Supporting Actor, an award he also received from the National Board of Review. The film racked up five Golden Globe nominations, five British Academy Awards (including Best Film) and two other nominations from that group, five Los Angeles Film Critics Awards and three New York Film Critics Awards, as well as many other awards and nominations from a number of critics groups and festivals worldwide.

Producers: Barbara De Fina, Irwin Winkler
Director: Martin Scorsese
Screenplay: Martin Scorsese; Nicholas Pileggi (screenplay and book "Wise Guy")
Cinematography: Michael Ballhaus
Art Direction: Maher Ahmad
Film Editing: James Kwei, Thelma Schoonmaker
Cast: Robert De Niro (James 'Jimmy' Conway), Ray Liotta (Henry Hill), Joe Pesci (Tommy DeVito), Lorraine Bracco (Karen Hill), Paul Sorvino (Paul Cicero), Frank Sivero (Frankie Carbone), Tony Darrow (Sonny Bunz), Mike Starr (Frenchy), Frank Vincent (Billy Batts), Chuck Low (Morris 'Morrie' Kessler), Frank DiLeo (Tuddy Cicero), Henny Youngman (Himself), Gina Mastrogiacomo (Janice Rossi), Catherine Scorsese (Tommy's Mother).
C-146m. Letterboxed.

by Rob Nixon
Goodfellas

Goodfellas

It has been rated by various polls as among the 100 greatest movies of all times and the second greatest gangster film ever; fans can recite sections of scenes verbatim, and lines from it have been ranked among the greatest bits of dialogue in movie history; critics, filmmakers, and admirers have argued that it deserves a place equal to director Martin Scorsese's acknowledged masterpiece Raging Bull (1980). And, in 2000, Goodfellas (1990) was selected by the National Film Preservation Board to be one of the cinema treasures preserved in the National Film Registry of the Library of Congress. Not bad for a movie that initial preview audiences either walked out of in disgust or commented on with extreme negativity. As much as its style, characters, and subject matter have become identified with its creator, Scorsese has said he never had a desire to make just another mob movie. The Godfather saga had already indelibly stamped the genre with perhaps its greatest myth almost 20 years earlier, and any number of imitators of Francis Ford Coppola's epic have looked at the Mafia from a wide range of angles over the years. What grabbed Scorsese's eye, however, was journalist Nicholas Pileggi's 1986 book Wiseguy: Life in a Mafia Family, which in its true story of mobster-turned-informant Henry Hill focused on the ordinary "soldier" rather than the larger-than-life bosses. Thanks to Coppola's work, the Mafia don had become a mythic figure, one whose actions and motives came to be seen as indicative of American society and corporate capitalism as a whole. With Pileggi's book, Scorsese saw an opportunity to present the story of the common thieves and killers, the guys who follow the orders and carry out the day-to-day criminal tasks. He was also excited about finding a film language that would capture the style of Pileggi's lean, tough, fast-moving journalistic prose. The story follows Henry Hill from his teenage years, staring out the window of his family's apartment at the hoods and crooks operating out of a neighborhood storefront (much as Scorsese had done as a child in Little Italy), longing to be a part of their exciting world. Although half-Irish and therefore unqualified to ever be a "made man" (one officially inducted into the Mafia inner circle through a solemn oath), Hill eventually becomes a trusted and busy soldier of mob boss Paulie Cicero and falls in with two other henchmen, professional thief Jimmy Conway and sociopathic killer Tommy DeVito. The story also relates details of his marriage, his affair with a hotheaded mistress, and his descent into heavy cocaine use. By the end, Hill runs afoul of the law and the mob, turns state's evidence against his former associates, and ends up in the Witness Protection Program. The mere recounting of this plot, however, does little justice to Scorsese's bravura approach to the material, incorporating freeze frames and jump cuts characteristic of the French New Wave films of the early 1960s, voiceovers and direct address to the camera to amplify the action and passage of time, and the use of popular songs that has become so identified with the director's style. Scorsese hired Pileggi to co-write the script (the first time Scorsese took writing credit since Mean Streets in 1973), and kept much of the language and details from the book intact. Pileggi credits Scorsese with a great deal of help and inspiration in the process: "He was stuck with somebody who really didn't know anything so he really had to bring me along as far as film was concerned." For Hill's two partners in crime, Scorsese turned to the stars of Raging Bull, casting Robert De Niro as Jimmy and Joe Pesci as Tommy. Actually, he didn't think he had a part in the movie for a star of De Niro's caliber, but the actor himself suggested he play the supporting role, and his presence helped encourage the studio to boost the budget to $25 million, the most Scorsese was allotted for a production up to that point. For the central character, Henry Hill, Scorsese wanted Ray Liotta, who had never carried a major film himself but who had attracted a lot of attention for his supporting role as Melanie Griffith's dangerous ex-husband in Jonathan Demme's Something Wild (1986). Producer Irwin Winkler was against using Liotta until the actor pulled him aside for a long private talk. There's no record of what was said, but when it was over Liotta had the part. To prepare for the part, Liotta obsessively listened to tapes of Pileggi's interview with Henry Hill while driving back and forth between New York and his parents' New Jersey home. De Niro talked personally to Hill many times about Jimmy Conway, whose real last name was Burke. According to Hill, De Niro would call him up to five times a day to discuss the minutest detail of every small action or gesture. Arguably the film's most memorable scene, Tommy goading Henry with the threatening "How am I funny?" banter, was actually an incident that happened to Joe Pesci years before. As with many other scenes (and typical of the way Scorsese usually worked with De Niro), it was improvised between Liotta and Pesci several times, then incorporated into the script. Scorsese decided to capture it in a medium shot rather than intercutting to a lot of close-ups, so that he could get the full effect of Tommy's diatribe on all the other characters in the scene. The cast also includes a number of actors familiar to any fan of the genre, particularly those who watched The Sopranos television series. One such player is Michael Imperioli, who played the major role of Christopher on The Sopranos, making his third feature film appearance with Goodfellas as a young man who waits on the mob guys in their social club and gets his foot shot by psycho Tommy. The creators of the TV series paid homage to this film by having Christopher do the same thing to a bakery employee and then remarking casually, "It happens." Scorsese also used members of his own family and not for the first time. Mother Catherine makes her third appearance in one of her son's films as Tommy's mother, improvising a kitchen scene with De Niro, Liotta, and Pesci. Father Charles, in his fifth Scorsese film, plays the prisoner who gets chided for putting too many onions in the tomato sauce. Also in the cast, as Jimmy's wife, is Julie Garfield, whose father, John Garfield, often played an early prototype of the New York tough guy in his brief but memorable film career (1938-1951). And the U.S. attorney who negotiates with Karen and Henry Hill about entering the Witness Protection Program is played by Edward McDonald, the real-life federal attorney who did the actual negotiating with the Hills. Following the popularity and critical praise for the film upon its release, Henry Hill couldn't resist letting people know he was the basis for the lead character. Some sources say this was why he was taken out of the protection program, although other sources cite multiple drug arrests as the reason. In the years since the end of this story, Hill has been, among other things, an Italian chef, and once operated a restaurant called Wise Guys. He was sentenced to two years probation for public drunkenness in March 2009. Hill is the only one of the principals in the famous 1978 Lufthansa heist (a central plot point of the film) still alive. Jimmy Burke lived to see the release of the movie (and claimed De Niro consulted with him frequently, although that has been disputed) but died in prison in 1996 of lung cancer, eight years before he would have been eligible for parole. Goodfellas received Academy Award nominations for Best Picture, Director, Writing, Editing, and Supporting Actress (Lorraine Bracco as Karen Hill). Joe Pesci won Best Supporting Actor, an award he also received from the National Board of Review. The film racked up five Golden Globe nominations, five British Academy Awards (including Best Film) and two other nominations from that group, five Los Angeles Film Critics Awards and three New York Film Critics Awards, as well as many other awards and nominations from a number of critics groups and festivals worldwide. Producers: Barbara De Fina, Irwin Winkler Director: Martin Scorsese Screenplay: Martin Scorsese; Nicholas Pileggi (screenplay and book "Wise Guy") Cinematography: Michael Ballhaus Art Direction: Maher Ahmad Film Editing: James Kwei, Thelma Schoonmaker Cast: Robert De Niro (James 'Jimmy' Conway), Ray Liotta (Henry Hill), Joe Pesci (Tommy DeVito), Lorraine Bracco (Karen Hill), Paul Sorvino (Paul Cicero), Frank Sivero (Frankie Carbone), Tony Darrow (Sonny Bunz), Mike Starr (Frenchy), Frank Vincent (Billy Batts), Chuck Low (Morris 'Morrie' Kessler), Frank DiLeo (Tuddy Cicero), Henny Youngman (Himself), Gina Mastrogiacomo (Janice Rossi), Catherine Scorsese (Tommy's Mother). C-146m. Letterboxed. by Rob Nixon

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Martin Scorsese was nominated for the Directors Guild of America's 1990 Outstanding Directorial Achievement Award.

Voted Best Picture of the Year (1990) by the Los Angeles Film Critics Association. Also cited for Best Director, Best Supporting Actor (Joe Pesci), Best Supporting Actress (Lorraine Bracco), and Best Cinematography.

Voted Best Picture of the Year (1990) by the National Society of Film Critics.

Voted Best Picture of the Year (1990) by the New York Film Critics Circle. Also cited for Best Director. In addition, Robert De Niro was named Best Actor for his performances in "Goodfellas" and "Awakenings" (USA/90).

Released in United States Fall September 19, 1990

Released in United States September 21, 1990

Expanded Release in United States February 15, 1991

Released in United States on Video Summer 1991

Released in United States on Video June 19, 1991

Released in United States 1990

Released in United States September 1990

Released in United States April 1991

Released in United States February 1996

Released in United States 2015

Martin Scorsese won the Silver Lion at the 1990 Venice Film Festival.

Shown at Venice Film Festival (in competition) September 4-15, 1990.

Shown in New York City (American Museum of the Moving Image) as part of program "Scorsese/De Niro Retrospective" April 20 & 21, 1991.

Shown in New York City (American Museum of the Moving Image) as part of program "Martin Scorsese" February 17-25, 1996.

Joe Pesci received the 1990 Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor.

Began shooting May 3, 1989.

Completed shooting August 9, 1989.

Selected in 2000 for inclusion in the Library of Congress' National Film Registry.

Released in United States Fall September 19, 1990

Released in United States September 21, 1990

Expanded Release in United States February 15, 1991

Released in United States on Video Summer 1991 (letterboxed version)

Released in United States on Video June 19, 1991

Released in United States 1990 (Martin Scorsese won the Silver Lion at the 1990 Venice Film Festival.)

Released in United States September 1990 (Shown at Venice Film Festival (in competition) September 4-15, 1990.)

Released in United States April 1991 (Shown in New York City (American Museum of the Moving Image) as part of program "Scorsese/De Niro Retrospective" April 20 & 21, 1991.)

Released in United States February 1996 (Shown in New York City (American Museum of the Moving Image) as part of program "Martin Scorsese" February 17-25, 1996.)

Released in United States 2015 (Gala - 25th Anniversary Celebration)

Joe Pesci was named best supporting actor of 1990 by the National Board of Review.