The Good Son


1h 27m 1993

Brief Synopsis

In this suspense thriller a 12-year-old boy goes to live with relatives after his mother's death and comes under the influence of his malevolent cousin.

Film Details

Also Known As
Good Son, Ondskans ansikte, bon fils
MPAA Rating
Release Date
1993
Production Company
Al Jacques
Distribution Company
20th Century Fox Distribution
Location
Two Harbors, Minnesota, USA; Gloucester, Massachusetts, USA; Silver Bay, Minnesota, USA; Cape Ann, Massachusetts, USA; Las Vegas, Nevada, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 27m

Synopsis

In this suspense thriller a 12-year-old boy goes to live with relatives after his mother's death and comes under the influence of his malevolent cousin.

Crew

Suzy Abbott

Other

Jim Adler

Production Assistant

Deborah Aquila

Casting

Dorothy Aufiero

Production Coordinator

Heidi August

Production Accountant

Joni Avery

Stunts

Rick Avery

Stunts

Gregory J Barnett

Stunts

Gail Barringer

Accounting Assistant

Clay Bartholomew

Transportation Coordinator

Ken Bates

Stunts

Bill Beard

Key Grip

Bob Becchio

Camera Assistant

Carlos Bermudez

Electrician

Elmer Bernstein

Music

Emilie A Bernstein

Music Arranger

Elisha Birnbaum

Foley

Sue Blainey

Assistant Editor

Stan Bochner

Sound Editor

Harry Peck Bolles

Assistant Sound Editor

Richard Boris

Other

George Bowers

Editor

Steve Boyd

Transportation Coordinator

Nick Brett

Stunts

Rolland M. Brooks

Other

Cheryl M Broussard

Other

Gary Burritt

Negative Cutting

Tony Campenni

Grip

Janet Campolito

Other

Jay Cannold

Accounting Assistant

Anthony Cappello

Assistant Camera Operator

Lon Caracappa

Electrician

Richard L Carden

Dolly Grip

Richard L Carden

Key Grip

Debbie Lee Carrington

Stunts

Phillip V Caruso

Photography

Andrew Casey

Assistant Camera Operator

Mike Cassidy

Stunts

Kimberly Catalano

Assistant Production Coordinator

Lou Cerborino

Sound Editor

Richard P. Cirincione

Sound Editor

Peter C Clarke

Props Assistant

Almarie Clifford

Other

Beth Cohen

Camera Assistant

David D. Collins

Assistant Location Manager

K.c. Colwell

Assistant Director

Eddie Conna

Stunts

Elizabeth Crane

Other

David Crone

Steadicam Operator

Stephen Lee Davis

Assistant Director

Sandy De Crescent

Music Contractor

Anna Delanzo

Boom Operator

Antonio Deleon

Other

George Detitta Jr.

Set Decorator

Marjorie Deutsch

Editor

Gerald Donlan

Assistant Sound Editor

Thomas Doran

Grip

Twentieth Century Draperies

Special Thanks To

Kathy Durning

Music Editor

Stuart Emanuel

Sound Editor

Christopher Epper

Stunts

Tempest S Farley

On-Set Dresser

Michael Fauntleroy

Assistant Camera Operator

Elizabeth Feldbauer

Wardrobe Supervisor

Harriet Fidlow

Adr Editor

Glory Fioramonti

Stunts

Ray Fisher

On-Set Dresser

Ken Fitzgibbons

Other

Tom Fleischman

Rerecording

Frank Fleshman

Other

Jimmy Flynn

Other

Cynthia Flynt

Costume Designer

Andy Gill

Stunt Coordinator

Danny Gill

Special Effects Assistant

Jack Gill

Stunt Coordinator

Anne Gordon

Animal Wrangler

Joseph A Graham

Dolly Grip

Debbie Greg

Stunts

Tony Grocki

Assistant Sound Editor

Bill Groom

Production Designer

David Gulick

Property Master

Andy Harris

Assistant Camera Operator

Laurel Harris

Art Department Coordinator

Gene Harrison

Stunts

Kerry Hayes

Photography

Donald G Helderle

Other

Phil Hetos

Color Timer

Debbie Holbrook

Set Costumer

Sheri Hooper

Assistant

Susan Hooper

Assistant

Jeff Howery

Crane Grip

Bobby Huber

Key Grip

Colette Irving

Stunts

Eli Irving

Stunts

Al Jacques

Cable Operator

Diane Jessup

Animal Wrangler

Charlene Joyce

Production Assistant

Thomas Kane

Unit Production Manager

Jason Kasperski

Production Assistant

David Katz

Video Assist/Playback

Richard King

Assistant Sound Editor

Henry Kingi

Stunts

Sarah E. Knowles

Assistant Art Director

Scott Koenig

Assistant

Kenneth M Kroll

Accounting Assistant

Kevin Kubota

Boom Operator

Marilee Lear

Extras Agent/Coordinator

Andre Leavitt

Craft Service

Louie Lefande

Video Assist/Playback

Julie Lichter

Casting Associate

John Lindley

Dp/Cinematographer

John Lindley

Director Of Photography

James Macdonald

Other

Barry Malawski

Sound Editor

Bernadette Mazur

Makeup Artist

Larry Mccarron

Dolly Grip

Stan Mcclain

Camera Operator

Larry Mcconkey

Steadicam Operator

Cassy Mcevoy

Set Costumer

Ian Mcewan

Screenplay

Kristy Mcgill

Stunts

Sandra Mcneil

Other

Steve Mcnulty

Props

Elizabeth Miller

Craft Service

Leigh A Miller

Production Coordinator

Kris Moran

Production Assistant

Kris Moran

Props Assistant

Len Morganti

Storyboard Artist

Matt Morris

Location Assistant

Margo Myers

Accounting Assistant

James H Nau

Assistant Sound Editor

Peter Nauyokas

On-Set Dresser

John M Neal

Accounting Assistant

Keith Neely

Assistant Art Director

Larry Nicholas

Stunts

Peter Norman

Camera Operator

Anne O'brien

Apprentice

Billy O'brien

Other

Bitty O'sullivan-smith

Sound Editor

Timothy O'toole

Video Assist/Playback

Noon Orsatti

Stunts

Raquel Osborne

Extras Agent/Coordinator

Mary Ann Page

Producer

Francesca Paris

Hair Stylist

Stanley Pasay

Other

Frederic Perrin

Other

Jonathan Pessin

Production Assistant

Juliet Polcsa

Assistant Costume Designer

Arthur Pottie

On-Set Dresser

Ashleigh Powell

Stunts

Kim Quam

Other

Pam Ranger

Location Assistant

Ronald H Raschke

Camera Assistant

Barbara Ravis

Assistant Director

Spiro Razatos

Stunts

Van Redin

Photography

Brian Ricci

Special Effects Assistant

Stephen R Ricci

Special Effects Assistant

Paul Richards

On-Set Dresser

Marc Rogers

Gaffer

Daniel Rogosin

Executive Producer

Joseph Ruben

Producer

David Rudolph

Grip

Dan Runyon

Craft Service

Julio Salazar

Transportation Captain

Jackie Savetsky

Production Assistant

Bob Schneig

On-Set Dresser

Jane Shannon

Casting Associate

Doron Shauly

Assistant Editor

Jerry Siegel

Titles And Opticals

Kurt L Smith

Other

Rusty Smith

Art Director

Jay Sparks

Medic

Gregory Speed

Assistant Editor

Ira Spiegel

Sound Editor

Gary Stanek

Location Manager

Stuart Stanley

Sound Editor

Don Steele

Wrangler

Michael Steele

Assistant Director

Michael Steele

Coproducer

Madi Stein

Assistant

Eric Swanek

Assistant Camera Operator

Ezra Swerdlow

Executive Producer

Samantha Z Timmerman

Script Supervisor

Susumu Tokunow

Sound Mixer

Robert Topol

Scenic Artist

Neil Trifunovich

Special Effects Coordinator

Tony Trotta

Scenic Artist

Derrick Tseng

Best Boy

Anthony F Veader

Hairdresser

Donna Vega

Electrician

Roger J. Vernon

Camera Operator

Monica Von Huene

Production Assistant

David Wahnon

Assistant Sound Editor

Dan Wallin

Other

Barth W Ward

Video Assist/Playback

William M Weberg

Grip

Jamie Weidenhorn

Production Assistant

Earl Wiggins

Other

Michael L. Williams

Location Manager

Film Details

Also Known As
Good Son, Ondskans ansikte, bon fils
MPAA Rating
Release Date
1993
Production Company
Al Jacques
Distribution Company
20th Century Fox Distribution
Location
Two Harbors, Minnesota, USA; Gloucester, Massachusetts, USA; Silver Bay, Minnesota, USA; Cape Ann, Massachusetts, USA; Las Vegas, Nevada, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 27m

Articles

Elmer Bernstein (1922-2004)


Elmer Bernstein, the film composer who created unforgettable music for such classics as The Magnificent Seven, To Kill a Mockingbird, and won his only Academy Award for Thoroughly Modern Millie, died of natural causes at his Ojai, California home on August 17. He was 82.

Elmer Bernstein, who was not related to Leonard Bernstein, was born on August 4, 1922, in New York City. He displayed a talent in music at a very young age, and was given a scholarship to study piano at Juilliard when he was only 12. He entered New York University in 1939, where he majored in music education. After graduating in 1942, he joined the Army Air Corps, where he remained throughout World War II, mostly working on scores for propaganda films. It was around this time he became interested in film scoring when he went to see William Dieterle's The Devil and Daniel Webster (1941), a film whose score was composed by Bernard Herrmann, a man Bernstein idolized as the ideal film composer.

Bernstein, who originally intended to be a concert pianist and gave several performances in New York after being discharged from military service, decided to relocate to Hollywood in 1950. He did his first score for the football film Saturday's Hero (1950), and then proved his worth with his trenchant, moody music for the Joan Crawford vehicle Sudden Fear (1952). Rumors of his "communist" leanings came to surface at this time, and, feeling the effects of the blacklist, he found himself scoring such cheesy fare as Robot Monster; Cat Women of the Moon (both 1953); and Miss Robin Caruso (1954).

Despite his politics, Otto Preminger hired him to do the music for The Man With the Golden Arm, (1955) in which Frank Sinatra played a heroin-addicted jazz musician. Fittingly, Bernstein used some memorable jazz motifs for the film and his fine scoring put him back on the map. It prompted the attention of Cecil B. De Mille, who had Bernstein replace the ailing Victor Young on The Ten Commandments (1956). His thundering, heavily orchestrated score perfectly suite the bombastic epic, and he promptly earned his first Oscar® nod for music.

After The Ten Commandments (1956), Bernstein continued to distinguish himself in a row of fine films: The Rainmaker (1956), Sweet Smell of Success (1957), Some Came Running (1958), The Magnificent Seven (a most memorable galloping march, 1960); To Kill a Mockingbird (unique in its use of single piano notes and haunting use of a flute, 1962); Hud (1963); earned a deserved Academy Award for the delightful, "flapper" music for the Julie Andrews period comedy Thoroughly Modern Mille (1967), and True Grit (1969).

His career faltered by the '80s though, as he did some routine Bill Murray comedies: Meatballs (1980) and Stripes (1981). But then director John Landis had Bernstein write the sumptuous score for his comedy Trading Places (1983), and Bernstein soon found himself back in the game. He then graced the silver screen for a few more years composing some terrific pieces for such popular commercial hits as My Left Foot (1989), A River Runs Through It (1992) and The Age of Innocence (1993). Far From Heaven, his final feature film score, received an Oscar® nomination for Best Score in 2002. He is survived by his wife, Eve; sons Peter and Gregory; daughters Emilie and Elizabeth; and five grandchildren.

by Michael T. Toole
Elmer Bernstein (1922-2004)

Elmer Bernstein (1922-2004)

Elmer Bernstein, the film composer who created unforgettable music for such classics as The Magnificent Seven, To Kill a Mockingbird, and won his only Academy Award for Thoroughly Modern Millie, died of natural causes at his Ojai, California home on August 17. He was 82. Elmer Bernstein, who was not related to Leonard Bernstein, was born on August 4, 1922, in New York City. He displayed a talent in music at a very young age, and was given a scholarship to study piano at Juilliard when he was only 12. He entered New York University in 1939, where he majored in music education. After graduating in 1942, he joined the Army Air Corps, where he remained throughout World War II, mostly working on scores for propaganda films. It was around this time he became interested in film scoring when he went to see William Dieterle's The Devil and Daniel Webster (1941), a film whose score was composed by Bernard Herrmann, a man Bernstein idolized as the ideal film composer. Bernstein, who originally intended to be a concert pianist and gave several performances in New York after being discharged from military service, decided to relocate to Hollywood in 1950. He did his first score for the football film Saturday's Hero (1950), and then proved his worth with his trenchant, moody music for the Joan Crawford vehicle Sudden Fear (1952). Rumors of his "communist" leanings came to surface at this time, and, feeling the effects of the blacklist, he found himself scoring such cheesy fare as Robot Monster; Cat Women of the Moon (both 1953); and Miss Robin Caruso (1954). Despite his politics, Otto Preminger hired him to do the music for The Man With the Golden Arm, (1955) in which Frank Sinatra played a heroin-addicted jazz musician. Fittingly, Bernstein used some memorable jazz motifs for the film and his fine scoring put him back on the map. It prompted the attention of Cecil B. De Mille, who had Bernstein replace the ailing Victor Young on The Ten Commandments (1956). His thundering, heavily orchestrated score perfectly suite the bombastic epic, and he promptly earned his first Oscar® nod for music. After The Ten Commandments (1956), Bernstein continued to distinguish himself in a row of fine films: The Rainmaker (1956), Sweet Smell of Success (1957), Some Came Running (1958), The Magnificent Seven (a most memorable galloping march, 1960); To Kill a Mockingbird (unique in its use of single piano notes and haunting use of a flute, 1962); Hud (1963); earned a deserved Academy Award for the delightful, "flapper" music for the Julie Andrews period comedy Thoroughly Modern Mille (1967), and True Grit (1969). His career faltered by the '80s though, as he did some routine Bill Murray comedies: Meatballs (1980) and Stripes (1981). But then director John Landis had Bernstein write the sumptuous score for his comedy Trading Places (1983), and Bernstein soon found himself back in the game. He then graced the silver screen for a few more years composing some terrific pieces for such popular commercial hits as My Left Foot (1989), A River Runs Through It (1992) and The Age of Innocence (1993). Far From Heaven, his final feature film score, received an Oscar® nomination for Best Score in 2002. He is survived by his wife, Eve; sons Peter and Gregory; daughters Emilie and Elizabeth; and five grandchildren. by Michael T. Toole

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Fall September 24, 1993

Released in United States on Video March 2, 1994

Macaulay Culkin reportedly received between $5 and $6 million for his role.

Macaulay Culkin reportedly received between $5 and $6 million for his role.

Began shooting November 19, 1992.

Project was originally set to start production November 1991 with Michael Lehmann as director.

Completed shooting March 25, 1993.

Released in United States Fall September 24, 1993

Released in United States on Video March 2, 1994