Goldeneye


2h 10m 1995
Goldeneye

Brief Synopsis

Armed with his license to kill, James Bond (Agent 007) races to Russia in search of the stolen access codes for "GoldenEye," an awesome space weapon that can fire a devastating electromagnetic pulse toward the Earth. However, Bond is up against an enemy who anticipates his every move: Alec Trevelyan, a.k.a. Agent 006, a mastermind motivated by years of simmering hatred. As Bond squares off against his former compatriot, he also battles Trevelyan's stunning ally, Xenia Onatopp, an assassin who uses pleasure as her ultimate weapon. When the horrifying extent of Trevelyan's plans is revealed, Bond must call upon his sharp wits and killer instincts in a deadly confrontation. From a destructive tank chase through the streets of St. Petersburg to the treacherous Cuban jungle, Bond finds himself playing a cat-and-mouse game to the finish.

Film Details

Also Known As
Bond - Goldeneye
MPAA Rating
Genre
Action
Adventure
Mystery
Thriller
Spy
Adaptation
Release Date
1995
Distribution Company
METRO-GOLDWYN-MAYER STUDIOS INC. (MGM )/UNITED INTERNATIONAL PICTURES (UIP)
Location
London, England, United Kingdom; Puerto Rico; Caribbean; Monte Carlo, Monaco

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 10m

Synopsis

Armed with his license to kill, James Bond (Agent 007) races to Russia in search of the stolen access codes for "GoldenEye," an awesome space weapon that can fire a devastating electromagnetic pulse toward the Earth. However, Bond is up against an enemy who anticipates his every move: Alec Trevelyan, a.k.a. Agent 006, a mastermind motivated by years of simmering hatred. As Bond squares off against his former compatriot, he also battles Trevelyan's stunning ally, Xenia Onatopp, an assassin who uses pleasure as her ultimate weapon. When the horrifying extent of Trevelyan's plans is revealed, Bond must call upon his sharp wits and killer instincts in a deadly confrontation. From a destructive tank chase through the streets of St. Petersburg to the treacherous Cuban jungle, Bond finds himself playing a cat-and-mouse game to the finish.

Crew

Andrew Ackland-snow

Art Director

John Altman

Original Music

John Altman

Music Conductor

Darren Andrews

Visual Effects

David Arch

Original Music

Martin Asbury

Storyboard Artist

Peter Aston

Visual Effects

Kenny Atherfold

Grip

Norman Baillie

Special Effects

Richard Bain

Special Effects

Jolyon Bambridge

Visual Effects

Duncan Barbour

Stunts

Nikki Barton

Special Effects

Steve Begg

Visual Effects

Tony Bell

Boom Operator

Jacqueline Benloulou

Accountant

Brian Bishop

Scenic Artist

Luigi Bisioli

Gaffer

Nigel Blake

Visual Effects

Charles Bodycomb

Other

Bono

Song

Mike Boone

Assistant Art Director

Nigel Brackley

Visual Effects

Tony Bradley

Other

Jake Brake

Other

Barbara Broccoli

Producer

Sylvie Brocheré

Casting

Christopher Brosnan

Office Runner

Clive Brown

Construction Manager

Regis Brun

Location Manager

Kathrin Brunner

Art Director

Mara Bryan

Effects Coordinator

Mark Bullimore

Visual Effects

Syd Cain

Storyboard Artist

Jeffrey Caine

Screenplay

Angus Cameron

Visual Effects

Kathy Caraveo

Production Coordinator

David Carrigan

Assistant Director

Michael A Carter

Sound Re-Recording Mixer

Jamie Christopher

Assistant Director

Paul Clancy

Special Effects

Sean Connor

Camera

Chris Corbould

Special Effects Supervisor

Brenda Coxon

Visual Effects

Simon Crane

Stunt Coordinator

Steve Crawley

Digital Effects Supervisor

Tom Danaher

Pilot

David Deane

Other

Linda Devetta

Makeup Supervisor

Pam Dixon Mickelson

Casting

Delta Doric

Other

Jim Dowdall

Stunts

Paul Dunn

Special Effects

Harriet Earle

Location Manager

Tracey Eddon

Stunts

Jamie Edgell

Stunts

Nigel Egerton

Wardrobe

David Eltham

Special Effects

Fred Evans

Chief Modelmaker

Mike Evans

Camera

Anthony Fabian

Advisor

Bruce Feirstein

Screenplay

Jasper Fforde

Camera

Sue Field

Continuity

Nicholas Finlayson

Special Effects

John Fisher

Video

Ian Fleming

Characters As Source Material

Peter Flynn

Pilot

Michael Ford

Set Decorator

Steve Foster

Gaffer

Eric Fourniols

Assistant Director

Michael France

Story By

Michael France

From Story

Bob Freeman

Grip

Susan French

Assistant Editor

Christoph Frutiger

Camera

Irina Ganina

Accountant

Gerry Gavigan

Assistant Director

Roger Gibbon

Visual Effects

Pat Gilbert

Assistant Sound Editor

Leonhard Gmur

Production Manager

Ellen S Gordon

Production Manager

Tony Graysmark

Construction

Steve Griffin

Stunts

Ana Groennou

Location Manager

Tim Grover

Effects Assistant

Hilary Haines

Hairdresser

Ricky Hall

Grip

Stephen Hamilton

Digital Effects Supervisor

Keith Hamshere

Photography

Harvey Harrison

Director Of Photography

Harvey Harrison

Dp/Cinematographer

Graham V Hartstone

Sound Re-Recording Mixer

Bob Hathaway

Music Editor

John Hayward

Sound Re-Recording Mixer

Paul Heasman

Stunts

Lindy Hemming

Costume Designer

Etienne Herrenschmidt

Pilot

Dick Hewitt

Video

Ron Higgins

Props

Sarah Hinch

Assistant

Matthew Holben

Special Effects

John Holmes

Visual Effects

Nellee Hooper

Song

Andy Hopkins

Other

Mathew Horton

Chief Modelmaker

Antony Hunt

Visual Effects

Eunice Huthart

Stunts

Celia Irvin

Assistant

Andrew Jack

Dialogue Coach

Jamie Jackson-moore

Visual Effects

Kate Rhodes James

Casting Associate

Colin Jamison

Hair

Jan Jamison

Hairdresser

Andrew Jeffery

Visual Effects

David John

Sound Recordist

B D Johnson

Other

Peter Jones

Video

Dominique Julienne

Stunts

Remy Julienne

Stunts

Dave Keen

Special Effects

Risa Kes

Casting

Daniel Kleinman

Main Title Design

David Knowles

Special Effects

Paul Knowles

Special Effects

Philip Kohler

Production Manager

Hans-peter Kuenzli

Pilot

Steve Lamonby

Stunts

Michael Lamont

Art Director

Neil Lamont

Art Director

Peter Lamont

Production Designer

Steven Lawrence

Assistant Art Director

Maryline Lebec

Stunts

Charles Dwight Lee

Art Director

Tim Lewis

Assistant Director

Didier Lozahic

Sound Mixer

Richard Lucas

Special Effects

Jim Machin

Visual Effects

Terry Madden

Assistant Director

Jacques Malnuit

Other

Alan Marques

Visual Effects

Sean Mccabe

Stunts

Sean Mcconville

Visual Effects

Callum Mcdougall

Production Manager

Debbie Mcwilliams

Casting

Jane Meagher

Accountant

Derek Meddings

Digital Effects Supervisor

Elliott Meddings

Assistant Director

Philip Meheux

Dp/Cinematographer

Philip Meheux

Director Of Photography

Karin Mercurio

Accountant

Wayne Michaels

Stunts

Ernst Michel

Other

Rick Mietkowski

Visual Effects

John Modder

Special Effects

Roy Moores

Other

Greg Morgan

Visual Effects

John Morgan

Camera Operator

Peter Musgrave

Dialogue Editor

Sybil Nicolas-eprendre

Location Manager

Andrew Noakes

Production Accountant

Douglas Noakes

Other

Charlie Noble

Special Effects

Monty Norman

Music

Peter Notley

Special Effects

Chrissie Overs

Chief Modelmaker

Justin Owen

Other

David Paris

Pilot

Helga Patry-ploiner

Accountant

Roger Pearce

Camera Operator

Grahame Peters

Assistant Editor

Rebecca Peters

Video Assist/Playback

Tom Pevsner

Executive Producer

Bill Pochetty

Gaffer

Ray Potter

Best Boy

Gary Powell

Stunts

Steve Price

Sound Mixer

Trefor Proud

Makeup

Ron Quelch

Production

Roy Quinn

Special Effects

Herbert Raditschnig

Camera Operator

June Randall

Script Supervisor

Neil Ravan

Location Manager

Terry Rawlings

Editor

Crispin Reece

Production Manager

David Relfe

Visual Effects

Candida Richardson

Video Assist/Playback

Graham Riddell

Visual Effects

Paul Riddle

Special Effects

Bob Risk

Foley Editor

Penny Robinson

Accountant

Stuart Robinson

Visual Effects

John Roebuck

Accountant

Iris Rose

Unit Manager

Marge Rowland

Other

Jane Royle

Makeup

Luke Rutter

Special Effects

Shaun Rutter

Special Effects

Mark Sale

Assistant Sound Editor

1st Lt Dustin Salem

Other

Videos

Movie Clip

Goldeneye (1995) - Call It Professional Courtesy In St. Petersburg we meet Robbie Coltrane as Russian KGB man-turned-gangster Zukovsky, pursued by Bond (Pierce Brosnan) looking into the Janus crime syndicate, wrapped around Minnie Driver’s kooky cameo as a girlfriend and country singer, performing the Tammy Wynette standard, in Goldeneye, 1995.
Goldeneye (1995) - I Made It Easy This Time Neatly arrayed (presumably) enemies, at the ex-Soviet weapon center, we meet Izabella Scorupco as Natalya, and Alan Cumming as Boris, computer-espionage nerds, with provocative chat, their relation to James Bond’s activities unclear until Xenia (Famke Janssen) arrives with Ourumov (Gottfried John), in Goldeneye, 1995.
Goldeneye (1995) - Open, For England Just the beginning of the over ten-minute action prologue, boffo bungee jump (shot at Verzasca Dam, Switzerland) and Pierce Brosnan’s first appearance as Ian Fleming’s James Bond, 007, joined by Sean Bean as Alec Trevelyan, 006, in Goldeneye, 1995.
Goldeneye (1995) - No Problem With Female Authority In his signature Aston Martin, on French mountain roads near Monaco, Pierce Brosnan as James Bond, six years after the death of a colleague in an anti-Soviet operation, is being evaluated by psychiatrist Caroline (Serena Gordon), then overtaken by Famke Janssen in a Ferrari, early in Goldeneye, 1995.
Goldeneye (1995) - The Evil Queen Of Numbers First events in London, Bond (Pierce Brosnan, in his first feature as 007), jousts with Moneypenny (first appearance in the role for Samantha Bond), gets his suspicions confirmed by Tanner (Michael Kitchen, later the celebrated title character in TV’s Foyle’s War) then we meet Judi Dench, in her landmark introduction as the new “M,” in Goldeneye, 1995.

Hosted Intro

Film Details

Also Known As
Bond - Goldeneye
MPAA Rating
Genre
Action
Adventure
Mystery
Thriller
Spy
Adaptation
Release Date
1995
Distribution Company
METRO-GOLDWYN-MAYER STUDIOS INC. (MGM )/UNITED INTERNATIONAL PICTURES (UIP)
Location
London, England, United Kingdom; Puerto Rico; Caribbean; Monte Carlo, Monaco

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 10m

Articles

GoldenEye - Goldeneye


GoldenEye (1995) is one of the pivotal films in the James Bond franchise. Due to corporate legal wrangling, it had been six years after the last Bond film (Licence to Kill, 1989), and there was some question about how it would connect with modern audiences used to the grittier Die Hards and Lethal Weapons. The role had been recast with Pierce Brosnan, nearly a decade after he had to drop out of The Living Daylights (1987) due to his contract on the TV series Remington Steele. And, in an attempt to address the much-derided role of women in the films, Judi Dench was cast as the first female M. How GoldenEye fared would dictate the future of Bond. It turned out to be an enormous worldwide hit, ensuring that Bond would continue to suavely save the world in the decades to come.

Brosnan's path to Bond was a long and winding one. In 1986, he had beaten out Sam Neill and Timothy Dalton for the part in The Living Daylights and went so far as to take publicity photos at Pinewood Studios. His NBC show Remington Steele had been canceled, so he was free to take the job. But the news generated so much interest, that ratings on Steele spiked, and NBC reversed their decision, ordering six more episodes as a mid-season replacement. This angered Bond producer Albert "Cubby" Broccoli, whose aide was quoted in People magazine as saying, "He's not going to have another company riding on our publicity." The role instead went to Dalton.

So, when the part became available again for GoldenEye, Brosnan was the obvious choice. He felt the pressure, as he told The Guardian: "The skeptics were out in full: the world felt there was no need for another James Bond. So the challenge was enormous. I didn't want to get caught between what Sean and Roger had done. Yet, at the end of the day, my take was a little bit of what both had brought to the role. I leant towards Sean's style, but I couldn't deny Roger because GoldenEye was in the tongue-in-cheek style people had become used to." The film's pre-credit action sequence in the USSR takes place in 1986, essentially retconning the casting process so Brosnan has been Bond the whole time.

And the opening stunt, conceived by director Martin Campbell, is a stunner. It was a 700-foot bungee jump down the face of the Contra Dam in Switzerland, performed by stuntman Wayne Michaels, who, according to Campbell in The Guardian, nailed it on the first take. It is a bravura re-introduction to the character and by itself might have ensured GoldenEye's success.

The story by Michael France and screenplay by Jeffrey Caine and Bruce Feirstein reframes the post-Soviet Bond universe, including a more analytics-oriented MI6 led by Judi Dench as the new M and Samantha Bond as the new Moneypenny. Both women joust with Bond over his attitude towards women, with M calling him, "a sexist, misogynist dinosaur. A relic of the Cold War." But they still need him to save the world, of course. This time the world is endangered by Bond's former partner Alec Trevelyan (Sean Bean), who has gone rogue and started an international crime syndicate known as Janus. With the help of Russian General Ourumov (Gottfried John) and the man-crushing Xenia Onatopp (Famke Janssen) he seeks control of two "GoldenEye" satellites, electromagnetic pulse weapons that could shut down all electronic devices it targets, causing chaos.

Bond is aided by Russian computer programmer Natalya Simonova (Izabella Scorupco), the sole survivor from the first blast of the GoldenEye satellite. Their search for Trevelyan and the satellite takes them from St. Petersburg to Cuba, with some assistance from the CIA in the form of Jack Wade (a gruff and delightful Joe Don Baker). Pinewood Studios was at full capacity at the time of shooting, so according to James Chapman's Licence to Thrill, they "converted a disused Rolls-Royce factory at Leavesden Aerodome, near Watford, into a makeshift studio facility."

The most memorable moment shot in the studio occurs in a chase through the streets of St. Petersburg after Bond borrows a tank. Campbell told The Guardian, "We were getting very tight on budget by the time we got to the tank chase through the streets of St Petersburg, so we built replica streets in the studios at Leavesden. We had three or four Soviet battle tanks, T-55s, the proverbial unstoppable force. You just let the bloody thing go and it knocks anything down." It was everything a James Bond sequence should be - preposterously thrilling, seamlessly crafted and pulled off with a gleam in Brosnan's eye. GoldenEye would go on to make over $350 million worldwide and ensure a future for James Bond.

By R. Emmet Sweeney
Goldeneye - Goldeneye

GoldenEye - Goldeneye

GoldenEye (1995) is one of the pivotal films in the James Bond franchise. Due to corporate legal wrangling, it had been six years after the last Bond film (Licence to Kill, 1989), and there was some question about how it would connect with modern audiences used to the grittier Die Hards and Lethal Weapons. The role had been recast with Pierce Brosnan, nearly a decade after he had to drop out of The Living Daylights (1987) due to his contract on the TV series Remington Steele. And, in an attempt to address the much-derided role of women in the films, Judi Dench was cast as the first female M. How GoldenEye fared would dictate the future of Bond. It turned out to be an enormous worldwide hit, ensuring that Bond would continue to suavely save the world in the decades to come. Brosnan's path to Bond was a long and winding one. In 1986, he had beaten out Sam Neill and Timothy Dalton for the part in The Living Daylights and went so far as to take publicity photos at Pinewood Studios. His NBC show Remington Steele had been canceled, so he was free to take the job. But the news generated so much interest, that ratings on Steele spiked, and NBC reversed their decision, ordering six more episodes as a mid-season replacement. This angered Bond producer Albert "Cubby" Broccoli, whose aide was quoted in People magazine as saying, "He's not going to have another company riding on our publicity." The role instead went to Dalton. So, when the part became available again for GoldenEye, Brosnan was the obvious choice. He felt the pressure, as he told The Guardian: "The skeptics were out in full: the world felt there was no need for another James Bond. So the challenge was enormous. I didn't want to get caught between what Sean and Roger had done. Yet, at the end of the day, my take was a little bit of what both had brought to the role. I leant towards Sean's style, but I couldn't deny Roger because GoldenEye was in the tongue-in-cheek style people had become used to." The film's pre-credit action sequence in the USSR takes place in 1986, essentially retconning the casting process so Brosnan has been Bond the whole time. And the opening stunt, conceived by director Martin Campbell, is a stunner. It was a 700-foot bungee jump down the face of the Contra Dam in Switzerland, performed by stuntman Wayne Michaels, who, according to Campbell in The Guardian, nailed it on the first take. It is a bravura re-introduction to the character and by itself might have ensured GoldenEye's success. The story by Michael France and screenplay by Jeffrey Caine and Bruce Feirstein reframes the post-Soviet Bond universe, including a more analytics-oriented MI6 led by Judi Dench as the new M and Samantha Bond as the new Moneypenny. Both women joust with Bond over his attitude towards women, with M calling him, "a sexist, misogynist dinosaur. A relic of the Cold War." But they still need him to save the world, of course. This time the world is endangered by Bond's former partner Alec Trevelyan (Sean Bean), who has gone rogue and started an international crime syndicate known as Janus. With the help of Russian General Ourumov (Gottfried John) and the man-crushing Xenia Onatopp (Famke Janssen) he seeks control of two "GoldenEye" satellites, electromagnetic pulse weapons that could shut down all electronic devices it targets, causing chaos. Bond is aided by Russian computer programmer Natalya Simonova (Izabella Scorupco), the sole survivor from the first blast of the GoldenEye satellite. Their search for Trevelyan and the satellite takes them from St. Petersburg to Cuba, with some assistance from the CIA in the form of Jack Wade (a gruff and delightful Joe Don Baker). Pinewood Studios was at full capacity at the time of shooting, so according to James Chapman's Licence to Thrill, they "converted a disused Rolls-Royce factory at Leavesden Aerodome, near Watford, into a makeshift studio facility." The most memorable moment shot in the studio occurs in a chase through the streets of St. Petersburg after Bond borrows a tank. Campbell told The Guardian, "We were getting very tight on budget by the time we got to the tank chase through the streets of St Petersburg, so we built replica streets in the studios at Leavesden. We had three or four Soviet battle tanks, T-55s, the proverbial unstoppable force. You just let the bloody thing go and it knocks anything down." It was everything a James Bond sequence should be - preposterously thrilling, seamlessly crafted and pulled off with a gleam in Brosnan's eye. GoldenEye would go on to make over $350 million worldwide and ensure a future for James Bond. By R. Emmet Sweeney

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Voted best-marketed film of 1995 by the Film Information Council.

Released in United States Fall November 17, 1995

Released in United States on Video May 21, 1996

Additional photography took place for approximately two and one half weeks after the wrap of principal photography.

Completed shooting June 10, 1995.

Began shooting January 16, 1995.

The 17th sequel in the James Bond series released by United Artists Pictures (MGM/UA). "Never Say Never Again" (UK/1983), starring Sean Connery, was released by Warner Brothers.

Wide release in United Kingdom November 24, 1995.

Limited Released in London November 22, 1995.

Released in United States Fall November 17, 1995

Released in United States on Video May 21, 1996