Godzilla vs. Megalon


1h 14m 1973
Godzilla vs. Megalon

Brief Synopsis

Godzilla dukes it out with a giant cockroach that shoots dangerous laser beams. He gets help from some of his old monster friends, while his old nemesis "Gaigan", the robotic chainsaw monster, decides to make an appearance.

Film Details

Also Known As
Godzilla vs Megalon
MPAA Rating
Genre
Action
Adventure
Foreign
Sci-Fi
Release Date
1973
Distribution Company
Gaiam Vivendi Entertainment

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 14m
Sound
Mono
Color
Color (Fujicolor)
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
2.35 : 1

Synopsis

Godzilla dukes it out with a giant cockroach that shoots dangerous laser beams. He gets help from some of his old monster friends, while his old nemesis "Gaigan", the robotic chainsaw monster, decides to make an appearance.

Videos

Movie Clip

Godzilla Vs. Megalon (1973) - On Faraway Monster Island Opening the 13th feature in the Toho Films Ltd. franchise, made on a tighter schedule and budget, with narration referring to the actual American Cannikin nuclear test, the hero is aroused, and trouble for his cohabitants Rodan and Anguirus who fall into some kind of crack, in Godzilla Vs. Megalon, 1973.
Godzilla Vs. Megalon (1973) - Over Three Million Years Old Scientist Goro, with nephew Rokuro and buddy Hiroshi (Katsuhiko Sasaki, Hiroyuki Kawase, Yukata Hayashi) are puzzling over the burglars who escaped when they arrived at his extra-mod home, analyzing a button they grabbed, noting progress on the robot, and getting some Easter Island dates way wrong, in Godzilla Vs. Megalon, 1973.
Godzilla Vs. Megalon (1973) - I Will Unleash Megalon! We’re suddenly inside subterranean Seatopia (probably beneath Easter Island) where the boss guy (Robert Dunham) has gotten the green light from agents on earth to loose the (title) monster they’ve been keeping stashed, after nuclear tests messed up their kingdom, in Godzilla Vs. Megalon, 1973.
Godzilla Vs. Megalon (1973) - Godzilla's Come! The enemies from undersea have gotten Gigan (with the spines) to team up with Megalon to clobber the not too clever and just now up-sized good guy robot Jet Jaguar, created by Goro (Katsuhiko Sasaki, observing with friends Hiroyuki Kawase and Yukata Hayashi ), when the friendly champion arrives, to maybe save the day, in Godzilla Vs. Megalon, 1973.

Hosted Intro

Film Details

Also Known As
Godzilla vs Megalon
MPAA Rating
Genre
Action
Adventure
Foreign
Sci-Fi
Release Date
1973
Distribution Company
Gaiam Vivendi Entertainment

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 14m
Sound
Mono
Color
Color (Fujicolor)
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
2.35 : 1

Articles

Godzilla vs. Megalon


Godzilla vs. Megalon (1973) was the 13th film in the Japanese Godzilla franchise that debuted in 1954 and became a surprise worldwide hit, establishing the dinosaur-like Godzilla as an iconic "monster." As with the original film, this sequel has nuclear testing as the catalyst for the story. It was loosely based on the 1971 "Cannikin" United States test of a five-megaton underground nuclear test that outraged many and resulted in the formation of Greenpeace.

Under the original title of Gojira tai Megaro, Godzilla vs. Megalon, was written by Jun Fukuda (who also directed) and Shin'ichi Sekizawa, with special effects by Teruyoshi Nakano and was produced for Toho Studios in Japan. The newest character, a robot called Jet Jaguar, was the result of a 1972 children's contest by Toho Studios, with an elementary school student winning with his drawing of a robot named "Red Alone," which Toho renamed Jet Jaguar. Although the studio liked the character, they did not feel that it was strong enough to be the star of the film, and pre-production was shut down. Producer Tomoyuki Tanaka wanted to revitalize the project and hired Godzilla veteran screenwriter Shin'ichi Sekizawa to do a rewrite of the original story to create yet another Godzilla film, with the eventual shooting script by director Fukuda. The cast and crew had to work fast to keep the film on time and stay within the budget of approximately $760,000, so filming only lasted three weeks.

Godzilla vs. Megalon begins with a Cannikin-like underground nuclear test near the Aleutian Islands that is so powerful that the shockwaves reach Monster Island, where several monsters, including Godzilla, live. It also disturbs an unknown and undersea civilization called Seatopia, who have also been adversely affected by testing done by the nuclear powers. The latest test is one too many for the Seatopians when it damages Monster Island, where Godzilla watches his friends Rodan and Anguirus fall into a fissure in the Earth caused by the test. The Seatopiains wish to send their monsters, Megalon and Gigan, up to destroy everyone living on the surface in order to stop the nuclear testing. Three men, Goro Ibuki (Katsuhiko Sasaki), his brother Rokuro Ibuki (Hiroyuki Kawase) and Hiroshi Jinkawa (Yutaka Hayashi) are attacked by Seatopians at a dry lakebed while they are conducting tests on their new robot named Jet Jaguar, but manage to escape temporarily. Later, they are once again attacked by Seatopians, who want to steal Jet Jaguar so it can lead Megalon to the Earth's surface and convey orders from Seatopia so he can destroy the land nations. Megalon attacks Tokyo and the three scientists manage to recover Jet Jaguar and send him to find Godzilla on Monster Island and get him to help destroy Megalon. Also in the cast were Robert Dunham as the emperor of Seatopia, Shinji Takagi as Godzilla, Hideto Odachi as Megalon and Tsugutoshi Komada as Jet Jaguar.

The film was released in Japan in March 1973, but did not appear in the United States until April 1976. In order to entice the American market (and to piggyback on the success of the King Kong (1976) remake, Toho commissioned the American poster to feature Godzilla and Megalon fighting on top of New York's World Trade Center Twin Towers, even though the film never gets anywhere near New York City. Concessions had to be made to allow the film to have a G rating for the American market, including cuts of violent scenes and redubbing lines to remove light profanity.

When Godzilla vs. Megalon was released in the United States, it proved to be somewhat of a failure as it was the first Godzilla film to sell less than a million tickets. The cheap production and obvious comedy turned off die-hard Godzilla fans, who missed the edge of the other films. The New York Times film critic Vincent Canby, who had dismissed the earlier Godzilla films, called Godzilla vs. Megalon "[T]he canonization of Godzilla, the creature who came [...] to destroy Tokyo and has returned in sequels again and again to protect the land he once loathed. It's been a remarkable transformation of character--the dragon has become St. George. [...] [I]t's still one of the least offensive comic‐book movies I've seen recently. It's wildly preposterous, imaginative and funny (often intentionally). It demonstrates the rewards of friendship, between humans as well as monsters, and it is gentle."

SOURCES:
Another 'Godzilla? Movie. (1976, July 22). Retrieved from https://www.nytimes.com/1976/07/22/archives//another-godzilla-movie-monster-is-now-a-good-guy.html
Defending Godzilla in the 70s: Part 2 (2019, April 28). Retrieved from https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0070122/?ref_=tt_urv
Godzilla vs. Megalon (1973). (1973, March 17) ). Retrieved from https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0070122/?ref_=tt_urv

By Lorraine LoBianco
Godzilla Vs. Megalon

Godzilla vs. Megalon

Godzilla vs. Megalon (1973) was the 13th film in the Japanese Godzilla franchise that debuted in 1954 and became a surprise worldwide hit, establishing the dinosaur-like Godzilla as an iconic "monster." As with the original film, this sequel has nuclear testing as the catalyst for the story. It was loosely based on the 1971 "Cannikin" United States test of a five-megaton underground nuclear test that outraged many and resulted in the formation of Greenpeace. Under the original title of Gojira tai Megaro, Godzilla vs. Megalon, was written by Jun Fukuda (who also directed) and Shin'ichi Sekizawa, with special effects by Teruyoshi Nakano and was produced for Toho Studios in Japan. The newest character, a robot called Jet Jaguar, was the result of a 1972 children's contest by Toho Studios, with an elementary school student winning with his drawing of a robot named "Red Alone," which Toho renamed Jet Jaguar. Although the studio liked the character, they did not feel that it was strong enough to be the star of the film, and pre-production was shut down. Producer Tomoyuki Tanaka wanted to revitalize the project and hired Godzilla veteran screenwriter Shin'ichi Sekizawa to do a rewrite of the original story to create yet another Godzilla film, with the eventual shooting script by director Fukuda. The cast and crew had to work fast to keep the film on time and stay within the budget of approximately $760,000, so filming only lasted three weeks. Godzilla vs. Megalon begins with a Cannikin-like underground nuclear test near the Aleutian Islands that is so powerful that the shockwaves reach Monster Island, where several monsters, including Godzilla, live. It also disturbs an unknown and undersea civilization called Seatopia, who have also been adversely affected by testing done by the nuclear powers. The latest test is one too many for the Seatopians when it damages Monster Island, where Godzilla watches his friends Rodan and Anguirus fall into a fissure in the Earth caused by the test. The Seatopiains wish to send their monsters, Megalon and Gigan, up to destroy everyone living on the surface in order to stop the nuclear testing. Three men, Goro Ibuki (Katsuhiko Sasaki), his brother Rokuro Ibuki (Hiroyuki Kawase) and Hiroshi Jinkawa (Yutaka Hayashi) are attacked by Seatopians at a dry lakebed while they are conducting tests on their new robot named Jet Jaguar, but manage to escape temporarily. Later, they are once again attacked by Seatopians, who want to steal Jet Jaguar so it can lead Megalon to the Earth's surface and convey orders from Seatopia so he can destroy the land nations. Megalon attacks Tokyo and the three scientists manage to recover Jet Jaguar and send him to find Godzilla on Monster Island and get him to help destroy Megalon. Also in the cast were Robert Dunham as the emperor of Seatopia, Shinji Takagi as Godzilla, Hideto Odachi as Megalon and Tsugutoshi Komada as Jet Jaguar. The film was released in Japan in March 1973, but did not appear in the United States until April 1976. In order to entice the American market (and to piggyback on the success of the King Kong (1976) remake, Toho commissioned the American poster to feature Godzilla and Megalon fighting on top of New York's World Trade Center Twin Towers, even though the film never gets anywhere near New York City. Concessions had to be made to allow the film to have a G rating for the American market, including cuts of violent scenes and redubbing lines to remove light profanity. When Godzilla vs. Megalon was released in the United States, it proved to be somewhat of a failure as it was the first Godzilla film to sell less than a million tickets. The cheap production and obvious comedy turned off die-hard Godzilla fans, who missed the edge of the other films. The New York Times film critic Vincent Canby, who had dismissed the earlier Godzilla films, called Godzilla vs. Megalon "[T]he canonization of Godzilla, the creature who came [...] to destroy Tokyo and has returned in sequels again and again to protect the land he once loathed. It's been a remarkable transformation of character--the dragon has become St. George. [...] [I]t's still one of the least offensive comic‐book movies I've seen recently. It's wildly preposterous, imaginative and funny (often intentionally). It demonstrates the rewards of friendship, between humans as well as monsters, and it is gentle." SOURCES: Another 'Godzilla? Movie. (1976, July 22). Retrieved from https://www.nytimes.com/1976/07/22/archives//another-godzilla-movie-monster-is-now-a-good-guy.html Defending Godzilla in the 70s: Part 2 (2019, April 28). Retrieved from https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0070122/?ref_=tt_urv Godzilla vs. Megalon (1973). (1973, March 17) ). Retrieved from https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0070122/?ref_=tt_urv By Lorraine LoBianco

Quotes

Trivia

The super-robot Jet Jaguar was the first known fan submission in a Godzilla film. Toho held a contest for children to come up with a drawing of a new character, and the winner was "Red Arone", submitted by an elementary school student. Red Arone was a cross between Ultraman and the title robot of the popular anime series "Majinga Zetto" (1972), which was extremely popular at the time. The retooled and realized Red Arone was renamed "Jet Jaguar" by Toho's staff (The original "Red Arone" drawing can be seen on the wall next to the incomplete, headless Jet Jaguar in Goro Ibuki's laboratory early in the film).

This Godzilla film had the longest production schedule of all the films. The principal scenes directed by Jun Fukuda were shot in more than a couple of weeks, whereas the special effects/monster scenes by Teruyoshi Nakano were shot in six months (the average Godzilla film in both departments were shot in three to four months).

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Summer June 1976

Released in USA on video.

dubbed English

Released in United States Summer June 1976