The Gnome-Mobile


1h 30m 1967

Brief Synopsis

An eccentric millionaire and his niece and nephew are embroiled in the plights of some forest gnomes who are searching for the rest of their tribe. While helping them, the millionaire is suspected of being crazy because he's seeing gnomes! He's committed, and the niece and nephew and the gnomes have to find him and free him.

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Release Date
Jan 1967
Premiere Information
New York opening: 19 Jul 1967
Production Company
Walt Disney Productions
Distribution Company
Buena Vista Distribution Co., Inc.
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the novel The Gnomobile; a Gnice Gnew Gnarrative With Gnonsense, but Gnothing Gnaughty by Upton Beall Sinclair (New York, 1962).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 30m
Sound
Mono (RCA Sound System)
Color
Color (Technicolor)

Synopsis

Driving his vintage 1930 Rolls-Royce, D. J. Mulrooney, a California lumber tycoon, takes his visiting grandchildren, Rodney and Elizabeth Winthrop, for a picnic in a forest of redwoods. While Rodney is eating, Elizabeth wanders off into the woods and meets Jasper, a 2-foot-high gnome, and his 943-year-old grandfather, Knobby. Against the warnings of the birds and animals, Jasper tells Elizabeth of his plight: because he cannot find a girl gnome to marry, the species is in danger of becoming extinct. Touched by his sad tale, Elizabeth gets Mulrooney to place his Rolls at the disposal of Jasper and Knobby, and they all go on a quest for other gnomes. Before they can make much progress, however, Jasper and Knobby are kidnaped by Horatio Quaxton, the crafty proprietor of the "Academy of Fantastic Freaks." And when Mulrooney orders his vice-president, Ralph Yarby, to organize a search party for the missing gnomes, the millionaire is carried off to a sanitarium. But Knobby escapes into the woods as Rodney and Elizabeth help free their grandfather and then rescue Jasper from Quaxton's clutches. After eluding attendants from the sanitarium during a wild chase over the mountains, the Rolls pulls into a glade where Knobby has contacted the gnome-king, 1100-year-old Rufus, as well as a bevy of beautiful gnome-maidens. A mating contest is held to see which one of the maidens can catch Jasper and hold on to him for a count of seven. To Jasper's delight the winner is the shy Violet. And, as Rufus marries the young couple, Mulrooney generously donates 50,000 acres of his land to the gnomes.

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Release Date
Jan 1967
Premiere Information
New York opening: 19 Jul 1967
Production Company
Walt Disney Productions
Distribution Company
Buena Vista Distribution Co., Inc.
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the novel The Gnomobile; a Gnice Gnew Gnarrative With Gnonsense, but Gnothing Gnaughty by Upton Beall Sinclair (New York, 1962).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 30m
Sound
Mono (RCA Sound System)
Color
Color (Technicolor)

Articles

Sean McClory (1924-2003)


Sean McClory, an Irish-born actor who appeared in scores of American movies and made countless appearances on television shows, died on December 10th of heart failure at his home in Hollywood Hills. He was 79.

Born on March 8, 1924 in Dublin, Ireland, he became a leading man at the famous Abbey Theatre in the early '40s and relocated to the United States shortly after World War II. His first roles were small bits as a police officer in two RKO quickies: Dick Tracy's Dilemma and Dick Tracy Meets Gruesome (both 1947). He eventually graduated to more prestigious pictures like The Glass Menagerie (1950), Les Miserables (1952) and John Ford's The Quiet Man (1952).

After a few more supporting roles in quality pictures: Niagara (1953); the sci-fi chiller Them! (1954); and for John Ford again in The Long Gay Line (1955), McClory turned to television. He kept busy for several years with guest roles in a variety of popular shows: Bonanza, Wagon Train, Rawhide, Gunsmoke, The Outer Limits (1964) and countless others. By the mid-'60s, McClory became slightly more heavy-set, and began tossing off variations of jovial, "oirish" blarney for, yet again John Ford in Cheyenne Autumn (1964); and in a string of Disney pictures: Follow Me, Boys! (1966, his best role, a moving performance as the alcoholic father whose behavior alienates his son, played by a 15-year old Kurt Russell); The Happiest Millionaire (1967), and The Gnome-Mobile (1967), before he returned to television. His final role was in John Huston's acclaimed Irish opus The Dead (1987). He is survived by his wife, Peggy Webber McClory.

by Michael T. Toole
Sean Mcclory (1924-2003)

Sean McClory (1924-2003)

Sean McClory, an Irish-born actor who appeared in scores of American movies and made countless appearances on television shows, died on December 10th of heart failure at his home in Hollywood Hills. He was 79. Born on March 8, 1924 in Dublin, Ireland, he became a leading man at the famous Abbey Theatre in the early '40s and relocated to the United States shortly after World War II. His first roles were small bits as a police officer in two RKO quickies: Dick Tracy's Dilemma and Dick Tracy Meets Gruesome (both 1947). He eventually graduated to more prestigious pictures like The Glass Menagerie (1950), Les Miserables (1952) and John Ford's The Quiet Man (1952). After a few more supporting roles in quality pictures: Niagara (1953); the sci-fi chiller Them! (1954); and for John Ford again in The Long Gay Line (1955), McClory turned to television. He kept busy for several years with guest roles in a variety of popular shows: Bonanza, Wagon Train, Rawhide, Gunsmoke, The Outer Limits (1964) and countless others. By the mid-'60s, McClory became slightly more heavy-set, and began tossing off variations of jovial, "oirish" blarney for, yet again John Ford in Cheyenne Autumn (1964); and in a string of Disney pictures: Follow Me, Boys! (1966, his best role, a moving performance as the alcoholic father whose behavior alienates his son, played by a 15-year old Kurt Russell); The Happiest Millionaire (1967), and The Gnome-Mobile (1967), before he returned to television. His final role was in John Huston's acclaimed Irish opus The Dead (1987). He is survived by his wife, Peggy Webber McClory. by Michael T. Toole

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Notes

Copyright length: 85 min. Location scenes filmed in the Santa Cruz Mountains, California.