Glamour


1h 14m 1934

Brief Synopsis

Ambitious chorus girl Linda Fayne (Constance Cummings)achieves a friendship with successful composer Victor Banki (Paul Lukas), who writes a song for her and gets her in an Ibsen (Joseph Cawthorn) show where she is a hit. Fame, romance and marriage to Victor, and a baby follows. Linda is attracted to Lorenzo Valenti (Philip Reed as Phillip Reed), whom she discovered in a Bohemian cafe and persuades Ibsen to give him a job in her show. She and Valenti have an affair and Victor consents to a divorce. The locale shifts to London where Valenti's success and life style parallels Linda's rise to fame. Disillusioned, she returns to New York where tragedy awaits. The child dies and Victor has lost his ability, but Linda spurns Valenti's cable asking her to return to him, and she and Victor chart a new course in life.

Film Details

Also Known As
Edna Ferber's Glamour
Release Date
Apr 9, 1934
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Universal Pictures Corp.
Distribution Company
Universal Pictures Corp.
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the short story "Glamour" by Edna Ferber in Hearst's International-Cosmopolitan (Mar 1932).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 14m
Sound
Mono (Western Electric Noiseless Recording)
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
8 reels

Synopsis

Young and beautiful Linda Fayne is determined to become a stage star. By following him to his country home with non-stop chatter, Linda pesters composer Victor Banki until he takes her in and, at his wit's end, promises to write a song for her. When she overhears Victor's conversation with theater owner Carl Ibsen, she realizes he is uninterested in her and leaves. Victor is haunted by the thought of her, however, and after finding her again, falls in love with her and diverts all of his energy into making her a star. Unfortunately, Linda has no real talent, either as a dancer or singer. After Victor and she marry, Linda reads a movie star's account of how having a child improved her acting, and decides to have a child. In spite of her lack of talent, Linda becomes a major star after her baby is born and is hounded by reporters, dressmakers, photographers and aspiring actors. She has no time for her son Stevie, whose nurse Nana distrusts her and contrives to keep him away from her. One night at dinner, Victor and Linda discover a new talent, Lorenzo Valenti, and cast him in a leading role opposite Linda. Linda and Lorenzo fall in love, and after the musical ends, Linda leaves Victor to marry Lorenzo. Lorenzo becomes a star in London and Linda subjugates her career for him, becoming his secretary. She is blissfully happy until she discovers he is having an affair. Linda leaves Lorenzo and returns to America just as her little son dies of pneumonia. Stevie's death destroys Victor, who has been unable to compose music since Linda left him. Linda receives a telegram from Lorenzo asking her forgiveness and her return, but she realizes she and Victor belong together and they reunite.

Film Details

Also Known As
Edna Ferber's Glamour
Release Date
Apr 9, 1934
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Universal Pictures Corp.
Distribution Company
Universal Pictures Corp.
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the short story "Glamour" by Edna Ferber in Hearst's International-Cosmopolitan (Mar 1932).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 14m
Sound
Mono (Western Electric Noiseless Recording)
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
8 reels

Quotes

Trivia

Fifteen minutes were cut from the film after the Hollywood preview and before the New York release.

Notes

The onscreen title reads "Edna Ferber's Glamour." According to news items in Hollywood Reporter, Lois Weber was initially slated to write and direct the film, and Universal attempted to get Doris Kenyon for the lead, however, the production would have upset her honeymoon plans. Hollywood Reporter also noted that George O'Neill was to write revisions of the script, however, his contribution to the final film is undetermined. According to a Variety review, fifteen minutes of the film were cut between its Hollywood preview and New York release. A modern source notes that Constance Cummings was engaged to Carl Laemmle, Jr. at the time of this film.