Git Along Little Dogies


1h 2m 1937

Film Details

Release Date
Mar 22, 1937
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Republic Pictures Corp.
Distribution Company
Republic Pictures Corp.
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 2m
Film Length
6,020ft (8 reels)

Synopsis

Drilling for oil starts a heated fight between cowboy Gene Autry, who believes the territory's water supply will be ruined, and Doris Maxwell, whose father, a bank president, has embezzled $25,000 to support the project. Doris and Gene's feud heats up when she steals his horse "Champion" after he shoots out the tires on her car. Doris, who runs a radio station above Sing Low's cafe, attempts to discredit Gene by broadcasting him on a program sponsored by the oil company as he sings downstairs. Gene finds out about the trick the next day and sets out in a rage to find Doris. While George Wilkins, who is in charge of the oil well drilling, takes Doris to the drilling site, he tries to convince her that the well is dry and that he needs more money from her father to bring the well in. Wilkins is actually trying to swindle Maxwell by getting him to pay for all of the equipment while he stalls the drilling, after which he intends to take over the lease on the profitable land when the bank's lease runs out. Wilkins and Doris are taking the payroll to the site, when they are held up by two thieves, who are really Wilkins' henchmen. Gene inadvertently comes to the rescue and grudingly returns the money to Doris, who continues on to the site. Wilkins reprimands his men for getting caught and lets them go. Doris and Gene return to the bank, where they find that Maxwell has attempted suicide after receiving a letter notifying him that the bank examiner will arrive soon. Gene protects Maxwell from embezzlement charges by making it seem as if he was shot in a robbery. Soon after, Gene discovers that the railroad will go through the town if the oil comes in, and he tells Wilkins that he is publicly going to support the drilling. Wilkins does not want any public attention on his operation, so he orders his men to hold Gene captive until after the first of the month, when the lease will revert to him. Gene escapes, however, and alerts the townspeople to Wilkins' crooked dealings. Wilkins later spreads a rumor that Gene intentionally swindled his friends by making them buy worthless oil stock, and a mob gathers and goes after Gene. Wilkins infuriates the crowd further by stating that Gene is behind the bank robbery, and Gene is forced to flee before the mob lynches him. He is chased to the oil well, where he finds Sam Brown, an oil worker who was shot by Wilkins after he found out that the well only needs to be dynamited to come in. Gene gets a doctor for Sam, and then, with the aid of his pal, Frog Millhouse, dynamites the well despite interference from Wilkins and the crowd. The well comes in and soon the oil company, now the Maxwell-Autry company, is prospering. Gene hands out dividends to his friends on their stock, while Frog, who has been searching for an addition to his butterfly collection, finds a poor specimen.

Film Details

Release Date
Mar 22, 1937
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Republic Pictures Corp.
Distribution Company
Republic Pictures Corp.
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 2m
Film Length
6,020ft (8 reels)

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

According to a Hollywood Reporter news item, Tom Tyler turned down an unspecified part in this film after Republic refused to give him equal billing with Gene Autry. In the film, when "Gene" and "Frog" are attempting to sell oil well stock to their friends, they stage a musical revue, during which there is a sing-a-long. As the characters sing "Red River Valley," "She'll Be Comin' Round the Mountain," "The Long Ago," "Oh! Susanna" and "Good-Night Ladies," the lyrics and a bouncing ball appear on the screen so that the audience can join in. This was a convention frequently used in cartoons and short films of the era. Hollywood Reporter production charts list Frankie Marvin in the cast, but his participation in the completed film has not been confirmed. Modern sources list additional cast members as: G. Raymond Nye, George Morrell, Horace B. Carpenter, Rose Plummer, Earl Dwire, Jack Kirk, Al Taylor, Frank Ellis, Jack C. Smith, Murdock McQuarrie, Oscar Gahan, Monte Montague, Eddie Parker and Bob Burns.