George White's 1935 Scandals


1h 25m 1935

Film Details

Release Date
Mar 29, 1935
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Fox Film Corp.
Distribution Company
Fox Film Corp.
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 25m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
7,863 or 7,887ft (10 reels)

Synopsis

George White, just having finished a successful run of his musical show, "Scandals," travels by train to Florida for a vacation. On his way, he passes through Crossways, a small town in Georgia, where he is surprised to see his own name on the marquee of the town's theater. His curiosity piqued by this blatant attempt to capitalize on his success, George leaves the train and buys a ticket for the show. The show plays to a mostly empty house, but George is impressed by the talents of Honey Walters, a young singer. George offers Honey a job singing in his show in New York, and Honey's Aunt Jane, who failed in her own attempts to become a performer and who now has high hopes for her niece, encourages him to hire Eddie Taylor, Honey's childhood sweetheart and a composer, of whom Aunt Jane is also fond. George agrees, and back in New York, Eddie and Honey are a big success. However, at a club, Eddie meets the washed up actress and singer Miss Marilyn Collins, and Daniels, George's rival producer, flirts with Honey. George later learns that Eddie and Honey have been showing up at rehearsals and shows late and have been giving lackluster performances. George confronts Eddie about his conduct, and the young composer takes offense and quits. Next, he catches Honey arriving at the theater late and fires her. Honey asks Daniels for a job, and he offers her his love instead, which she refuses. Meanwhile, Eddie takes a low-paying job in a show in Scranton, Pennsylvania and arrives there to find Honey performing in the chorus line. Aunt Jane arrives at George's theater, hoping to see Eddie and Honey perform, as they have not written her in months. George will not tell Aunt Jane the truth, and he sets her up in a hotel room while he searches frantically for the missing pair. After he discovers that Eddie and Honey have been performing in Scranton, he finds them at the New York train station and puts them back into his show. Their performance a success, Eddie and Honey reunite with a contented Aunt Jane and then announce that they have married.

Cast

Alice Faye

Honey [Walters]

James Dunn

Eddie [Taylor]

Ned Sparks

Elmer [Stubbins]

Lyda Roberti

Manya

Cliff Edwards

Dude [Oliver]

Arline Judge

Midgie [Malone]

Eleanor Powell

Marilyn [Collins]

Emma Dunn

Aunt Jane

George White

Himself

The Scandal Beauties

Walter Johnson

Daniels

Thomas E. Jackson

Stage manager

Jed Prouty

Al Lee

Mae Gohlke

Sister act

Dee Gohlke

Sister act

Chico De Verdi

Orchestra leader

Mike Macey

Hungarian

Tony Abdanor

Turk

Rudolf Myzet

Bulgarian

Norman Ainsley

Englishman

Ernesto Zambrano

Spaniard

Martin Garralaga

Spaniard

Nicholas Kobliansky

Russian

Emma Dodson

Hawaiian girl

Jack Raymond

Jew

Betty Rome

Soloist

Adele Burian

Soloist

Josephine Campbell

Soloist

Charles Blair

Soloist

Wyn Davis

Soloist

Eddie Lee

Chinese

Ruth Marion

Mrs. Dude Oliver

Otto H. Fries

Singer

Scott Mattraw

Fat man

Si Jenks

Pop eye

Bobby Dunn

Cross-eyed man

Jack Duffy

Bearded man

Kenny Baker

Singer

Tom Ricketts

Old man

Charles Richman

Harriman

Ned Norton

Man with Daniels

Fredric Santley

Master of ceremonies

Lucille Nicholson

Dance team

Byron Poindexter

Dance team

Jack Mulhall

Ticket seller

Fuzzy Knight

Sam Fogel

Donald Kerr

Grady, dance instructor

Harry Dunkinson

Railroad dispatcher

Sam Mcdaniels

Black porter

Harrison Greene

Postman

Benny Rubin

Louie Pincus

Toshia Mori

Japanese girl

Leilami Deas

Hawaiian girl

Tamara Shayne

Russian girl

Lya Lys

French girl

La Gretta

Swedish girl

Enrico Ricardi

Foreman of jury

Blanca Vischer

Spanish girl

Paul Mcvey

Assistant stage manager

Iris Shunn

Miss Smith, secretary

Esther Brodelet

Lady-in-waiting

Marbeth Wright

Jean

Aloha Wray

Chorus girl

Edna Mae Jones

Boop's sister and dancer

Madelyn Earle

Boop's sister

Florine Dixon

One of Do's four gals

Marbeth Wright

One of Do's four gals

Kay Hughes

One of Do's four gals

Mildred Morris

One of Do's four gals

Roger Imhof

Officer Riley

Lois Eckhart

Madame DuBarry

Tom Thompson

Dancer

Jim Blair

Dancer

Jack De Shon

Dancer

Doris Baker

Dancer

Robin Ainsley

Dancer

Von Adair

Dancer

Evelyn Carpenter

Dancer

Virginia Cruze

Dancer

Virginia Carroll

Dancer

Jill Carroll

Dancer

Patricia Dobbs

Dancer

Eleanor Drury

Dancer

Margaret Harding

Dancer

Laurie Lynne

Dancer

Teddie Lura

Dancer

Dona La Barr

Dancer

Helen Macdonald

Dancer

Thelma Marland

Dancer

Helen Romaine

Dancer

Buddy Sterling

Dancer

Rosemary Smith

Dancer

Betty Jane Teagarden

Dancer

Eileen Thomas

Dancer

Lucille Walker

Dancer

Diane Dahl

Dancer

Loretta Andrews

Dancer

Marvelle Andre

Dancer

Bobbie Beal

Dancer

Sam Brown

Dancer

William Brande

Dancer

Donald Brown

Dancer

Bob Crosby

Dancer

Sally Dolling

Dancer

Patsy Daly

Dancer

Carol Lee

Dancer

Doris Davenport

Dancer

Frank Edmunds

Dancer

Susan Fleming

Dancer

Ercell Woods

Dancer

Clarise Woods

Dancer

Dan Wyler

Dancer

Vera Van

Dancer

Dorothy Sander

Dancer

Ed Stanbridge

Dancer

Rose Tyrell

Dancer

Beverly Royde

Dancer

Marion O'connell

Dancer

Wanda Perry

Dancer

Betty Mcmahon

Dancer

Inez Mortensen

Dancer

Allen Mathews

Dancer

James Notaro

Dancer

Maxine Nash

Dancer

George King

Dancer

Boyd King

Dancer

Patsy Lee

Dancer

Perk Lazelle

Dancer

Charles Lauder

Dancer

Edith Haskins

Dancer

Ruth Hart

Dancer

Sunny Ingram

Dancer

Alice Jans

Dancer

James Gonzalez

Dancer

Ben Hall

Dan Crimmins

Ralph Banks

Beth Hartman

Maidel Turner

Fred Wallace

Julie Cabanne

Film Details

Release Date
Mar 29, 1935
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Fox Film Corp.
Distribution Company
Fox Film Corp.
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 25m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
7,863 or 7,887ft (10 reels)

Quotes

Trivia

In the same year that this film was released, there was a "George White's Scandals of 1935" playing on Broadway. That show had nothing in common with this film except the title.

First major film role for 'Eleanor Powell' , after having appeared in bit parts in a couple of other films.

Notes

Although the screen credits for this film state "Entire Production Conceived, Produced and Directed by George White," news items and Hollywood Reporter production charts list Winfield R. Sheehan as the producer, James Tinling as the director and Jack Donohue as the dance director. According to correspondence in the Twentieth Century-Fox Records of the Legal Department at the UCLA Theater Arts Library, Damon Runyon allowed Fox to use anything from his "basic idea" for the film, a manuscript of some 5,000 words, at no charge and with no screen credit, as long as the parts that were not used could then be used by him. In a letter, Runyon noted that he understood "they are not using much of this 'basic idea' anyway." Correspondence in the legal files state that Sam Hellman and David Freedman wrote the original story for the film, although they were not given screen credit. Also, according to the legal files, Edmund Hartmann and Robert T. Kane wrote material that they hoped would be used in the film, but which was not used. The legal records indicate that Jack Yellen, Joseph Meyer and Herbert Magidson wrote some additional songs that were not used in the final film, and that Edward Heyman and Johnny Green also wrote a number of songs which were not used. One of these, "Joan of Arkansas," was used in Professional Soldier (see below). According to a Hollywood Reporter news item, three songs by Cliff Friend, Joseph Meyer and Jack Yellen, "I Like It with Music," "Sweet and Low Down" and one whose title was not given, were barred from the film by PCA director Joseph Breen. The news item states that White planned to use the songs in his next Broadway show. According to Variety, the song "The Hunkadola" was intended to be a burlesque on "The Continental" and other dances.
       Production charts list Stuart Erwin in the cast, but he was not in the final film. New York Times commented that the film "presents itself as a photographic imitation of a third-rate Broadway revue." According to the legal records and a 1938 Hollywood Reporter news item, a suit concerning the film was settled out of court for the alleged plagiarism of the cover design of the Theatre Magazine August 1929 issue. The cover design, a drawing by Andre Durenceau done in the style of Jean Dupas, had been enlarged to mural size for the Rainbow Room of New York's Rockefeller Center. The filmmakers had obtained permission to photograph the mural for use in constructing a set for a dance by Eleanor Powell, but they had neglected to consult the magazine. Powell made her motion picture debut in this film after appearing on Broadway for several years. Her next film was M-G-M's Broadway Melody of 1936, in which she was the female lead. She made ten more films for M-G-M until her retirement from the screen in 1943, following her marriage to actor Glenn Ford. During her screen career she was called "the female Fred Astaire" and frequently mentioned as the best tap dancer in the world. After retiring she was a guest star in the 1950 M-G-M film The Duchess of Idaho, and revived her night club act in the early 1960s.