George Washington Carver


1h 9m 1940

Film Details

Release Date
Apr 16, 1940
Premiere Information
New York premiere: 16 Apr 1940
Production Company
Bryant Productions
Distribution Company
St. George Motion Picture Supply Ltd.; State Rights
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 9m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
7 reels

Synopsis

This documentary on the eminent black scientist, George Washington Carver, opens with a brief history of black labor in the South. After examining some of the typical jobs of a black worker, including the tilling of soil, the cultivation of sugar and the gining of cotton, the film focuses on Carver, who, at age seventy-six, is teaching at the Tuskegee Institute in Alabama. When one of his young students approaches him with questions about what he will be able to do when he graduates, Dr. Carver relates his life story as an example: As an orphaned son of a slave woman, Carver is stolen from his owner by nightriders and ransomed for a racehorse. His interest in nature makes him determined to get an education, and through all the rebuffs and disappointments, he perseveres to become an agricultural specialist. Developing a scheme to raise peanuts on idle land not used for cotton crops, he creates an industry. His discovery of the many uses of the peanut plant helps to realize a source of income for the poor sharecroppers. Through his diligent research and unselfish devotion to his people, Dr. Carver serves as an example to all his students.

Film Details

Release Date
Apr 16, 1940
Premiere Information
New York premiere: 16 Apr 1940
Production Company
Bryant Productions
Distribution Company
St. George Motion Picture Supply Ltd.; State Rights
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 9m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
7 reels

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

Motion Picture Herald suggested that this feature would not only be popular with black audiences, but also with "interracial betterment groups" and would be appreciated for the choral singing of the Tuskegee choir. Contemporary sources indicate that students and other faculty of Tuskegee appear in the film, and that it had its world premiere at Tuskegee. In 1938, M-G-M produced a short film entitled The Story of Dr. Carver, directed by Fred Zinneman.